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Cooked With Cannabis on Netflix: Everything you need to know – Guilty Eats

An all-new cooking show, with a twist, is headed to Netflix! Here’s everything you need to know about Cooked with Cannabis.

At this point, Netflix has mastered every genre. From crime dramas to reality shows, the streaming giant has it all, and arguably features some of the best in each genre! Now, it’s taking over the kitchen even further with Cooked with Cannabis, a cooking competition series that debuts on April 20, because obviously!

Kelis Rogers, a singer-turned-chef, and Portland-based chef Leather Storrs, are set to host the upcoming show that focuses on cannabis-infused foods. To many, this is a brand new concept. There’s more to cooking with marijuana than brownies and cookies! Cooked with Cannabis is about to open the world up to three-course meals. How does one even cook this, and, most importantly, are these dishes even good? We’re about to find out.

From the official description from Netflix, “Here lies the most fun-filled, fascinating and mouth-watering cooking competition series that gives a whole new meaning to the word “baked.”

MORE: The best Easter treats: Welch’s Fruit Snacks, Hershey’s, Cheryl’s Cookies and more!

How many episodes and how does it work: Cooked with Cannabis will consist of six episodes (each running about 40 minutes) and see three chefs work against the clock, competing to create a three-course meal based on different themes assigned to them by our judges. The main ingredient is, of course, weed.

The judges and guest stars: Hosts Storrs and Rogers will sample each course to determine a winner. Dinner guests will also be present to sample the food and chime in with their thoughts. There will be one winner per episode, so three new chefs will be competing in each episode. Expect to see several guests you may recognize, such as Mary Lynn Rajskub, Too $hort, El-P, and others.

Next: Olive Garden deals: Don’t miss BOGO offer, a to-go exclusive!

Cooked with Cannabis streams on Netflix April 20. Will you be watching? 

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Housebound By COVID-19? Consider Home Cooking – With Cannabis. A New Digital ‘Easy-Bake Oven’ Can Help – Forbes


If you’re housebound by COVID-19 – as so many of us are – you’re probably doing more home cooking, for healthier fare and better use of limited resources. And in this, you’re not alone: The home-cooking trend is huge, reflected in the quarantine-friendly recipes popping up on Buzzfeed and the New York Times.

The New York Post reported that one Chinese cooking platform alone attracted 580 million views after the epidemic shut down that country in late December.

Here in the United States, however, you may be craving something a bit more on the wild side than Chinese rice noodles – and if that something is cannabis treats and topicals, a new device is making that process easier and cheaper.

It’s called the Nova FX, a newly released, thermally heated counter-top device from the Boston-based Ardent Company. Attorney and company founder and president Shanel Lindsay calls the cylindrical stainless steel device an “easy-bake oven” because it can activate your cannabis through the essential process of decarboxylation.

There’s more: The same device can also bake the edibles desired – whether that means THC-infused cookies, muffins, pizza and applesauce, or CBD-infused edibles for pain relief. Topical gels can also be made in the Nova FX, as well as infused oils.

Further, the Nova FX lets the cannabis chef customize the product to his or her specifications: from ingredients preferred, to the amount of sugar (or no sugar) added, to the use of lecithin for easier absorption. More precise dosing of THC or CBD is also possible.

Both CBD and THC foods can be prepared using the appliance, depending on the cannabis flower chosen.

The problem during the current coronavirus strictures, of course, is that THC flower strains are suddenly hard to come by due to the mandatory shuttering of nonessential businesses in multiple states.

This means that, even where it was previously legal, recreational cannabis may no longer be sold at dispensaries (though most may still sell CBD medicinal items).

The new rules put a strain on cannabis buyers. “People are hunkering down in order to stretch their materials, which is really important,” Lindsay says. “Without our product, people are using a lot of cannabis to make [food and topicals]. The Nova FX allows them to use much, much less cannabis.”

Then there’s the difficulty of how to make edibles. “You can go anywhere on the internet and see very, very complicated instructions on how to make cannabis products,” Lindsay says. “And at the end of the day… you’re going to use a lot more cannabis than you need to, and end up coming up with a sub-par product, because decarboxylation is not simple to do. It can use a lot of material and burn off the THC or CBD that you’re trying to activate.”

“Decarboxylation” is that previously mentioned prerequisite for making edibles because it allows the cannabis’s THC or CBD to work. What’s involved is a drying/heating process that activates the original cannabinoid compounds THCA and CBDA, turning them into THC and CBD.

That heating/drying process occurs to some degree with smoking or vaping cannabis because of the high heat involved – but cannabis for edibles must be heated some other way.

The Nova FX can “de-carb” – as Lindsay calls it — up to 4 ounces at a time, much more than its predecessor model, the Nova, which can handle just 1 ounce.

To achieve this essential de-carbing, the Nova FX has a thermal heating core wrapping around the whole device – unlike what’s found in an oven or crockpot. More even heating is therefore possible. “There are also two sensors that allow us to have an algorithm at the bottom, a micro-controller that creates laboratory-grade heating for this device,” Lindsay explains.

“This allows the baker to evenly, gently heat the cannabis, not vaporize it, she says – and, she claims, this capability saves a good deal of weed – and, therefore, money. What the cannabis cook can do next with the much larger Nova FX is bake up a whole batch of cookies or other desired edible treat right there in the device, the same way he or she might cook up a load of pasta (which, by the way, is also possible in the Nova FX).

This is why Lindsay labels her item a “crossover device,” which, she says, is augmented by testing results that show the efficacy of the product.

“We definitely are in a league of our own,” she declares.

In fact, the do-it-yourself edibles/topicals market has other players besides Ardent: They include LEVO II, an appliance that decarboxylates and prepares herbs (like cannabis) for infusions; the MagicalButter MB2e, a countertop botanical extractor which infuses herbs into butter, oil, alcohol and lotions; and the Hi herbal infuser.

Still, the Nova, which retails online and in health food stores for $350, is different for its baking capability and for the company’s impressive financial profile: It’s a woman-led startup that has chalked up $7 million in sales and been profitable since 2017.

Of course, what truly counts beyond profits is what this “easy-bake oven” offers during today’s stressful pandemic: opportunities for pain relief and relaxation for a whole lot of Americans who otherwise might never have fancied themselves to be home chefs.

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How to Make Cannabutter for Edibles – Leafly

How to Make Cannabutter for Edibles | Leafly


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Bailey Rahn and Anna Wilcox contributed to this article.


Cannabis-infused butter (cannabutter) is one of the simplest and most common ways to make infused cannabis edibles. However, making infused butter can be a little bit tricky. In order to activate its psychoactive potential, the flower must be heated slowly at a low temperature. This recipe will first guide you through this process–called decarboxylation–before walking you through a step-by-step guide to infusing butter.

Note: Homemade edibles are very difficult to accurately dose. This guide will give you some tips for more precise dosing, but all DIY cannabis cooks should be aware that there’s no way to guarantee the potency or homogeneity of their batch.

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How to make cannabis-infused butter (or ‘cannabutter’)

Butter is a delicious and versatile carrier for THC and other cannabinoids, although it isn’t the only one. You can also use coconut oil, olive oil, or any other fatty oil for your infusions. Just keep in mind, butter burns easily, so keep a close eye on your cannabutter as it cooks.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup of butter
  • 1 cup (7-10 grams) of ground cannabis, decarboxylated

The essential (and often missed) first step: Decarboxylating the cannabis

decarbing Decarboxylation

Jesse Milns/Leafly

Before making your cannabutter, you’ll need to decarboxylate, or “decarb”, the cannabis flower you’re working with. Skipping this step will result in a weak or inactive finished product. Here’s why: Cannabis buds produce a non-intoxicating acidic cannabinoid called THCA. When we smoke or vaporize cannabis, the heat converts THCA into THC, the molecule that delivers euphoric effects. If preparing CBD edibles, this same process should be applied.

Some recipes may instruct you to decarb cannabis in the hot butter directly, but the less time you spend soaking the buds, the better your infused butter is going to taste. For this reason, we recommend decarbing in the oven first.

Basic cannabutter recipe

decarb chef oven recipe

Jesse Milns/Leafly

  1. Decarb the cannabis. Preheat your oven to 245ºF. Place cannabis buds on a non-stick, oven-safe tray. Cover the tray with parchment paper to prevent sticking. Insert the tray into the oven and set a timer for 30-40 minutes. Older, drier cannabis may require less time. (Tip: you can also set your oven to 300ºF and heat for 10 to 18 minutes, although low-and-slow is the recommended approach when decarbing to better preserve the cannabinoids.) Every 10 minutes, gently mix the buds with a light shake of the tray to expose the surface area of the buds equally.
  2. Grind. Grind the decarboxylated cannabis coarsely with a hand grinder.
  3. Melt the butter. Add 1 cup of water and 1 cup of butter into a stock pot or saucepan. Simmer on low and let the butter melt. Adding water helps to regulate the temperature and prevents the butter from scorching.
  4. Add the cannabis. As the butter begins to melt, add in your coarsely ground cannabis product.
  5. Simmer. Maintain low heat (ideally above 160ºF but never exceeding 200ºF) and let the mixture simmer for 2 to 3 hours, stirring occasionally. The mixture should never come to a full boil.
  6. Strain the cannabutter. Set a funnel on top of a jar and line it with cheesecloth. Once the butter has cooled off, pour it over the cheesecloth funnel and allow it to strain freely. (Tip: Squeezing the cheesecloth may push more bad-tasting plant material through).
  7. Refrigerate the jar of butter. If excess water forms at the bottom of the jar, you can remove the solid butter with a knife and drain the water out. (The butter will need to refrigerate for about an hour before removing the water.)
  8. Dose carefully. Refer to dosing information below before adding your butter to any snacks, dishes, or desserts.

Directions for slow cooker

  1. Grind your cannabis coarsely with a hand grinder. (Tip: A coffee grinder will finely pulverize the flower and prevent effective straining of bad-tasting plant material.)
  2. Set your slow cooker to low, or somewhere around 160ºF. (Tip: Avoid exceeding 200ºF to prevent burning or wasting cannabinoids. You can also add a little water to help prevent scorching.)
  3. Add the butter and ground cannabis. Stir occasionally.
  4. After about 3 hours, turn off the crockpot and wait for the butter to cool.
  5. Strain as above. 

Tips for dosing cannabutter

Your butter’s potency depends on many factors, from how long and hot it was cooked to the potency of your starting material. Even the type of cannabis used (indica vs. sativa strains) can be a factor. To test the potency of your finished product, try spreading ¼ or ½ teaspoon on a snack and see how that dose affects you after an hour. Decrease or increase dose as desired. You can then use this personalized “standard” dose as a baseline for your recipes. For more information on why potency is so difficult to measure in homemade cannabis edibles, check out part four of this series.

Get started at a cannabis shop nearby

Hat-tip to Chef Torrin (aka The Dank Chef) for contributing tips, measurements, and expertise to this recipe.

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Leafly is the world’s largest cannabis information resource, empowering people in legal cannabis markets to learn about the right products for their lifestyle and wellness needs. Our team of cannabis professionals collectively share years of experience in all corners of the market, from growing and retail, to science and medicine, to data and technology.

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Kelis hosts Netflix’s ‘Cooking with Cannabis’ competition – New York Daily News

“In this country, there are so many things that have been used systematically to oppress groups of people, so this could be all fun and games, but you look at it and go, you know what, this is important. People’s lives have been affected in a really positive and negative way, and how do we take some control back?”

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How to make cannabis cooking oil – Leafly

How to make cannabis cooking oil | Leafly


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Infusion is often the most challenging part of cooking with cannabis and the reason why many people turn to their vaporizer in defeat. I’m here to tell you that you can do this! Not only is it doable, but it’s worth it.

If you haven’t yet discovered the wonder that is cannabis-infused eating, I’m excited for you because you’re in for an adventure. The experience from start to finish is significantly different from common inhalation methods. The effects are typically longer, stronger, and slower to set in.

For this reason, always start with a low dose and see how an edible affects you—especially if you’re cooking your own as it is impossible to calculate their potency.

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Cannabis-infused oil is probably the most versatile medium and a great place to start, since it can be used for baking desserts, sautéing veggies, frying up your morning eggs, or putting in your salad dressing. In addition, as is the case with cooking anything at home, you have complete control over its preparation. Does peanut oil hold a special place in your heart? Make cannabis-infused peanut oil!

Recipe for cannabis cooking oil

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup of ground cannabis flower (or less for milder potency)
  • 1 cup of cooking oil of your choice

Note: When making canna oil, you want to use a 1:1 ratio of cannabis to oil. 

Choosing the right cooking oil base for your canna oil

Picking the right oil for infusion comes down to your flavor preferences and the dishes you plan on cooking. Oils will have different consistencies at room temperature, so be sure to put thought into how you will be storing and using your oil.

Many oils work well with baking too! So you might want to choose an oil that will have a flavor and consistency that works for multiple recipes. For example, if you are looking for an oil that can be used in a stir fry as well as a pie crust, coconut oil is a great option. It adds great flavor to veggies and remains solid enough at room temperature to hold up as a pie crust.

If you are looking for an oil with a mild flavor, vegetable and canola oil are going to be great options. They are also very versatile and work with most recipes calling for oil.

If you want something a little more robust in flavor, you can infuse olive or avocado oil. Both stand up well to the cannabis flavor and can be stored in your pantry. One of the most surprisingly delicious deserts I ever had was an olive oil ice cream. So feel free to get creative!

Materials needed:

  • Strainer or cheesecloth
  • Grinder (a simple hand grinder works best; appliances like blenders and coffee grinder pulverize the cannabis, resulting in edibles with bad tasting plant material)
  • Double-boiler, slow cooker, or saucepan, etc.

Directions:

  1. Grind the cannabis. You can include the entire plant, just the flower, a little bit of both—this is all a matter of preference. Just keep in mind that anything small enough to fit through the strainer will end up in your finished product, so again, do not grind your cannabis into a fine powder.
  2. Combine oil and cannabis in your double-boiler, slow cooker, or saucepan, and heat on low or warm for a few hours. This allows for decarboxylation (activation of THC) without scorching (which destroys the active ingredients). In all cases, a small amount of water can be added to the mixture to help avoid burning, and the temperature of the oil should never exceed 245°F. Cooking can be done a variety of ways:
    • Crock pot method: Heat oil and cannabis in a slow cooker on low for 4-6 hours, stirring occasionally.
    • Double-boiler method: Heat oil and cannabis in a double-boiler on low for at least 6 hours (8 is better), stirring occasionally.
    • Saucepan method: Heat oil and cannabis in a simple saucepan on low for at least 3 hours, stirring frequently (a saucepan is most susceptible to scorching).
  3. Strain and store the oil. Do not squeeze the cheesecloth; this will simply add more chlorophyll to your oil. All remaining plant material can be discarded or used in other dishes if desired. The oil’s shelf life is at least two months, and can be extended with refrigeration.

Note: Be cautious when using the oil to prepare dishes that require heating. Do not microwave and choose low heat whenever possible.

Tips for reducing odor when making cannabis oil

The trick for reducing odor is using the right tool for decarboxylation. The steam produced during cooking might not give off a pungent odor at first, but it gets stronger with time. It takes hours for the oil to finish, so you can imagine that the odor can build, and, if you are in the same room the whole time, you may not notice the gradual increase in dankness.

Using kitchen devices with rubber seals on their lids will allow you to lock in the majority of the odor during the cook. Finding a crock pot or pressure cooker with this feature is easy. The seal allows you to be strategic in where and when you open the lid.

Whether you take it outside or put it under your kitchen vent, not allowing the odor to fill your space is paramount when it comes to discretion. But accidents happen! If you find yourself in a situation where your space is too pungent, check out our article on how to get rid of the cannabis odor.

How to cook with your weed oil

Now that you have successfully infused your oil of choice, be sure to try a little before you make an entire meal. You want to make sure the dosage is right so the meal is delicious as well as enjoyable afterward.

You also want to be sure not to scorch the oil while cooking (just like when you are making the oil). It would be a shame for all that hard work to go to waste and to be left with a cannabis-tasting creation without any of the effects.

Now get cooking! I suggest finding a few of your favorite recipes and see if an infused-cannabis oil could work. Experimenting with different recipes is half the fun, and here are a few of our favorite recipes to get you going:

Next up: Learn how to make infused coconut oil!

This post was originally published on September 19, 2013. It was most recently updated on March 20, 2020.

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Kayla Williams

Kayla is a writer with an emphasis in holistic health, bioengineering, and nutrition/dietetics.

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Kelis to Co-Host Cannabis Cooking Competition on Netflix – The Cannabis Exchange

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Now We’re Cooking! Kelis Hosting ‘Cooked With Cannabis’ Netflix Competition – stupidDOPE.com

Kelis has had the opportunity to live her first dream as a Grammy nominated, internationally celebrated entertainer and her second dream as chef has also come to pass. Now she is going to have her own unconventional cooking show on Netflix that surrounds marijuana recipes.

Her gig at Netflix is the culmination of a third dream for her. She is an admitted Netflix junky, and when she accepted the job, she got a Netflix manicure that she posted through Instagram.

Official named Cooked with Cannabis, the show will drop on April 20th (4/20), with a focus that goes beyond weed. Kelis wants to use the show to further the discussion about cooking with marijuana, the impact of food in today’s society, learning, and growing together culturally.

Cooked with Cannabis will encompass 6 episodes where she co-host with well known weed chef Leather Storrs. The competition based show allows chefs to cook a three course cannabis charged meals to win a $10,000 prize.

Dinner guests like Too $hort, Ricky Lake, and El-P of Run The Jewels will also appear. Keep an eye on Netflix for the premiere of Cooked with Cannabis on April 20th, and see Kelis’ announcement about the show below through her IG post.

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The best cannabis strains for cooking according to Canadian chefs – Leafly

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There’s no shortage of cannabis recipes and cookbooks. The internet is full of ideas that’ll inspire you to dust off that mixer, roll up your sleeves and get your hands dirty making some weed-infused eats.

And whether you’re still trying to master the basics like weed butter and canna cooking oil, or have moved on to more complicated recipes that call for ingredients like homemade canna flour, there are step-by-step tutorials for every level of at-home chef.

You may notice, however, that rarely do these recipes recommend which strains to use. So, to better understand the best types of bud to use for weed-infused food, we asked Canada’s favourite cannabis chefs (all of them winners in Leafly’s Readers’ Choice Awards) to share their favourite strains to bring into the kitchen.

There are two schools of thought:

Chefs who prefer a specific strain

Chef Travis Petersen, founder of the Nomad Cook, a company that prepares cannabis-infused meals for private dinner parties and corporate events, as well as cooking classes and recipes, always considers the terpenes of the bud he uses.

“Both Sundial Lemon Riot and Top Leaf Strawberry Cream have beautiful terpene profiles for cooking,” says Chef Travis, who appeared on MasterChef Canada in 2016.

Strains that have fruity and berry-like terpenes—they are a bit easier to work with as the flavour and aroma are already pleasing and come through nicely when extracting.

Chef Cody Lindsay

John Michael MacNeil, the corporate chef at Zenabis and Namaste, also considers terpenes and how they affect the dish he’s making.

“I like fresh limonene terpenes to complement fresh-cut citrus, especially in appetizer dishes,” says Chef John. “For baking, Pink Kush is great. Its slight bitterness complements dark chocolate and cocoa. Jack Herer is fresh and also bitter, which is great for savoury applications.”

Chef Cody Lindsay of The Wellness Soldier, a platform that empowers veterans and all Canadians to learn to cook with cannabis, says he prefers working with gassy/kushy strains like OG Kush, Diesel and Purple Kush.

“Those terps come through really well when pairing with savoury applications like our gorgonzola cream sauce or chimichurri,” he says.

But everybody is different, and just like taking a hit from a Jean Guy joint might make you feel creative and happy, that same inhale could send someone else into an uncomfortable state of panic.

Chef Danny Raposo, the man behind Stoner Chef Canada, says he isn’t a fan of cooking with so-called sativas in general. (Read more on why Leafly has moved away from classifying strains as sativa or indica, focusing on terpenes and cannabinoids instead.)

“My favourite two strains to cook with are Pink Kush and Purple Kush,” says Chef Danny. “I usually only cook with indicas because that’s what works best for me and my clients.”

Missing an ingredient? Find cannabis near you.

Chefs who’ll cook with any strain

While most chefs have their favourite strains, everyone we spoke with agreed that any strain of cannabis can technically work for cooking, so as long as it’s fresh, quality flower.

“I’m quite flexible in the strains I use,” says Charlotte Langley, a cannabis chef and also the COO at Scout Canning, a Canadian seafood canning company with a focus on sustainability. “For personal consumption, I lean more heavily on the CBD strains for relaxation and stress management, but depending on the client I’m working with, the strains change based on their needs.”

Terpene engagement, she says, comes later in her process, depending on the intended outcome of the dish.

Consider this when choosing strains for cooking

Some strains with off-putting aromas…are a little difficult to work with their flavour profile, but can still be used in different applications.

Chef Cody Lindsay

Some cannabis strains are nearly fool-proof for cooking.

“Strains that have fruity and berry-like terpenes—they are a bit easier to work with as the flavour and aroma are already pleasing and come through nicely when extracting,” says Chef Cody Lindsay. Think strains like Strawberry Cream, Blueberry, and Mango Haze.

And while certain strains don’t have the most appealing aromas or names, that shouldn’t deter you from experimenting either.

“Some strains with off-putting aromas such as Cat Piss, Cheese, and Sour Diesel are a little difficult to work with their flavour profile, but can still be used in different applications, like in our taco with pico de gallo and guacamole recipe,” says Chef Cody. (Note, at the time of writing, Cheese was available on the legal Canadian market. Sour Diesel and Cat Piss were not.)

Regardless of which strain you pick to cook your next meal, when it comes time to eat, always make sure to start low and go slow.

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Lisa Felepchuk is a seasoned lifestyle editor, writer and digital nomad based in beautiful Vancouver, British Columbia.

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Oklahoma restaurant owner experiments with cooking with cannabis – KOCO Oklahoma City

Jarros Friedel has his medical marijuana card and has been experimenting with recipes that go beyond the standard of gummies and brownies.One of the recipes the co-owner of Guyute’s in Oklahoma City has been working on is a chicken confit. He makes the oil at his house.”We grind up the cannabis. We put it in the oven at 220 for about an hour,” Friedel says in a video he sent to KOCO 5. “Once it’s decarbed, you set up a double boiler and heat it to about 140, put cannabis in oil in mason jar in a double boiler. Let it sit there. It becomes infused after about an hour, hour and a half. Strain oil.”And that wasn’t the only cannabis component to the chicken confit.”We made some verblanc sauce to put over the top of it with our infused cannabis butter,” Friedel said, “and the infused cannabis butter actually does have a smell to it.”KOCO 5’s Abigail Ogle: “I guess that just adds to the high, essentially?”Friedel: “Yes, absolutely. This is almost 200 milligrams per tablespoon, so it’s gonna put you out.”Friedel said the high amount of marijuana won’t really affect the taste or the smell of the chicken confit.Restaurant professionals aren’t the only ones getting creative in the cannabis kitchen. Lauri Dykstra started exploring marijuana recipes when she had stage 2 breast cancer.”Anything that you love to make, you can add a little bit of cannabis oil to it,” Dykstra said.People at a reputable dispensary will help customers buy what they need.”You just start out with a really low amount and see what you can tolerate,” Dykstra said.That aspect is key as experts said it can be harder to gauge how much marijuana you’re ingesting when you eat it compared to smoking it.”The critical thing is obviously getting the dosing correct, which is more difficult than it might seem,” Dr. Steven Ross said.How the cannabis is ingested also should be taken into consideration.Ogle: “Would you say that it’s more potent this way? To eat it rather than smoke it?”Friedel: “Absolutely. It’s very much more potent this way.”Ogle: “So what serving of this would be? One piece of chicken?”Friedel: “Yes, one piece of of chicken and some potatoes and asparagus and onions.”Ogle: “Would you be OK to drive after that?”Friedel: “Legally, I don’t believe so. It helps pain a lot. And nausea. And insomnia. Running a restaurant, being here until 4 to 5 in the morning, it really helps to ease your pain, helps you go to bed really easy.” It’s important to note that the restaurant owner KOCO 5 spoke to said they are not selling any dishes with marijuana, just experimenting with recipes in their kitchen.At this point, it would be illegal for a location to cook a cannabis dish and serve it to someone at a restaurant, even if the customer has their medical marijuana card.

Jarros Friedel has his medical marijuana card and has been experimenting with recipes that go beyond the standard of gummies and brownies.

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One of the recipes the co-owner of Guyute’s in Oklahoma City has been working on is a chicken confit. He makes the oil at his house.

“We grind up the cannabis. We put it in the oven at 220 for about an hour,” Friedel says in a video he sent to KOCO 5. “Once it’s decarbed, you set up a double boiler and heat it to about 140, put cannabis in oil in mason jar in a double boiler. Let it sit there. It becomes infused after about an hour, hour and a half. Strain oil.”

And that wasn’t the only cannabis component to the chicken confit.

“We made some verblanc sauce to put over the top of it with our infused cannabis butter,” Friedel said, “and the infused cannabis butter actually does have a smell to it.”

KOCO 5’s Abigail Ogle: “I guess that just adds to the high, essentially?”

Friedel: “Yes, absolutely. This is almost 200 milligrams per tablespoon, so it’s gonna put you out.”

Friedel said the high amount of marijuana won’t really affect the taste or the smell of the chicken confit.

Restaurant professionals aren’t the only ones getting creative in the cannabis kitchen. Lauri Dykstra started exploring marijuana recipes when she had stage 2 breast cancer.

“Anything that you love to make, you can add a little bit of cannabis oil to it,” Dykstra said.

People at a reputable dispensary will help customers buy what they need.

“You just start out with a really low amount and see what you can tolerate,” Dykstra said.

That aspect is key as experts said it can be harder to gauge how much marijuana you’re ingesting when you eat it compared to smoking it.

“The critical thing is obviously getting the dosing correct, which is more difficult than it might seem,” Dr. Steven Ross said.

How the cannabis is ingested also should be taken into consideration.

Ogle: “Would you say that it’s more potent this way? To eat it rather than smoke it?”

Friedel: “Absolutely. It’s very much more potent this way.”

Ogle: “So what serving of this would be? One piece of chicken?”

Friedel: “Yes, one piece of of chicken and some potatoes and asparagus and onions.”

Ogle: “Would you be OK to drive after that?”

Friedel: “Legally, I don’t believe so. It helps pain a lot. And nausea. And insomnia. Running a restaurant, being here until 4 to 5 in the morning, it really helps to ease your pain, helps you go to bed really easy.”

It’s important to note that the restaurant owner KOCO 5 spoke to said they are not selling any dishes with marijuana, just experimenting with recipes in their kitchen.

At this point, it would be illegal for a location to cook a cannabis dish and serve it to someone at a restaurant, even if the customer has their medical marijuana card.

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4 Cannabis Peanut Butter Recipes (That Will Make You Even More Popular with Friends) – Greencamp

Who can ever turn down one big spoon of peanut butter? We can’t, that’s for sure – especially if we add a little bit of cannabis inside.

That’s why we prepared four different recipes for you. We want you to try them out and then enjoy all the compliments you will receive once you serve them to your friends.

But before we start, there are two things to keep in mind. First, it’s very important to calculate the proper dosage of cannabis in your butter. Rule of thumb: never put a lot at the beginning. Start low and add more later.

While cannabis dosage differs from person to person, we have guidelines on weed measurements you can use to test out and follow as you measure out your weed and cook your peanut butter to your preferred potency. It can also simply help you define what measurement units mean in actual amounts of weed.

Second, an essential part of the process to cover is cannabis decarboxylation. In each of these recipes, you’ll have to use cannabis that is decarboxylated. This process activates the cannabinoids found in cannabis, making them easy for the body to absorb.

The Process of Decarboxylation

Don’t worry, the decarboxylation process may sound like a hard thing to do, but in reality, it’s a piece of cake.

Utensils you will need:

  • Baking Tray
  • Baking Sheet
  • Tinfoil

Start with preheating your oven (approximately 100ºC). Use a baking tray and add a baking sheet on it. After that, place your cannabis on the sheet and tent it with tinfoil. You want to spread the cannabis out as much as you can, but don’t try to cram in too much on the tray.

Place it in the oven and wait for 50 minutes. The length of time is a guideline only. It really depends on the oven. When your cannabis becomes dry and brown with a crumbly consistency, you know it’s done.

Now that you have decarboxylated your cannabis and have it all ready and prepared for your peanut butter, let’s jump straight into the recipes.

Quick and Easy Peanut Butter

Let’s warm you up with the easiest recipe. You won’t be making your own peanut butter from scratch for this one.  Instead, you’ll be using store-bought peanut butter.

Preparation time: 15 minutes

Serving: 1 Person

Level: Beginner

Take one small bowl and add two tablespoons of peanut butter. Add inside one tablespoon of olive oil and mix it until you get a smooth texture. After that, add in your cannabis and mix it well. When you’re done, put it in the freezer for a couple of hours.

Keep in mind that this peanut butter will have crumbles. If you are not a big fan of that crumbly texture, you can easily make cannabis-infused olive oil and use it in the recipe to get a smooth butter-like texture. There are a lot of variations you can try and get it closer to your preferences.

Homemade Cannabis Peanut Butter

This recipe requires a little bit more effort since we’re going to make our own peanut butter instead of using peanut butter from the store.

Preparation time: 25 minutes

Serving: More than 5

Level: Beginner

Since we’ll be making peanut butter from scratch ourselves, let’s take a look at the list of ingredients. This way you’ll know what to prepare.

  • 5 Cups of peanuts (unsalted)
  • 1 Teaspoon of salt
  • 2 Tablespoons of honey
  • ¼  Cup of peanut oil
  • Cannabis

Put the peanuts, salt, and honey in a blender and grind everything for a couple of minutes. When there are no crumbles, add the peanut oil and blend it for another two minutes.

Add your cannabis and keep blending until you achieve the desired texture. If you prefer your peanut butter a little crumbly, don’t blend it too much, and if you like smooth peanut butter, blend it for a couple more minutes.

Put everything in a bowl with a cover and place it in the freezer. Each time you want to serve your peanut butter, give it a little stir with a spoon.

Haitian Cannabis Peanut Butter

If you’re tired of regular peanut butter and you want to spice things up a little bit, this is the recipe for you.

Preparation time: 20 minutes

Servings: 4

Level: Beginner

What ingredients will you need?

  • 2 Cups unsalted raw peanuts
  • 2 Tablespoons peanut oil
  • 1 Teaspoon of red pepper
  • 2 Tablespoons of brown sugar or honey
  • 1/4 Teaspoon of salt

When you look at all the above ingredients, it doesn’t seem like the stuff you would expect in peanut butter, right? Well, all those ingredients combined make heaven in a jar!

If you want to make original Haitian peanut butter, you need to roast the raw peanuts for a couple of minutes.

Put the peanut oil into a pan and add the two cups of raw peanuts. After two or three minutes of stirring, transfer the mixture into a blender. Use the spatula to scoop the leftover oil from the pan and add that into the blender, as well.

Add in the other ingredients – the red pepper, salt, and brown sugar or honey. If you want to follow the original recipe, add sugar, but if you prefer honey, then use that, instead. The taste will remain the same. Blend everything for a minute or two and add your cannabis. Keep blending until you get a creamy texture.

When you’re done, put everything into a jar and leave it in the freezer.

Enjoy!

Thai Cannabis Peanut Butter

Lastly, we’ll leave you with another different, yet tasty recipe. The process of making this Thai-inspired peanut butter is similar to all the other recipes we’ve covered. The only difference is the spices.

You’ll need things like soy sauce and red curry, but once you’re done you’ll have a rhapsody for your palate.

Preparation time: 20 minutes

Servings: 3

Level: Beginner

There are nine things you’ll need to make this Thai cannabis peanut butter.

  • 1 1/2 Cups of coconut milk
  • 1 Cup creamy peanut butter
  • 1/4 cup Thai red curry paste
  • 2 Tablespoons of apple cider vinegar
  • 2 Tablespoons of soy sauce
  • 2 Tablespoons of brown sugar or honey
  • 1 Tablespoon of fresh lime juice
  • 2 Tablespoons of peanuts
  • Cannabis

Start by adding everything but the cannabis and the peanuts into the blender. Again, you can choose whether you want to add brown sugar or honey, just don’t add both. Mix them until you get a creamy texture and then add in your cannabis and peanuts. Blend for one minute (or less) and you’re done.

This peanut butter should ideally be crumbly, but if you don’t like that use cannabis olive oil instead, and don’t add in any of the peanuts. Again, it’s all about your preferences. Place it in the freezer and wait a little bit before serving.

Cannabis-Infused Olive Oil

As you’ve already noticed, we mentioned a couple of times that you can use cannabis-infused olive oil. Cannabis olive oil is easy to make, and you only need a few things and a little bit of time.

If you aren’t a fan of crumbly peanut butter, and you wish to use infused oil instead, you can make it by combining olive oil and decarboxylated cannabis and cooking it for a couple of hours. You don’t have to stir constantly, so it doesn’t require a lot of effort.

When you’re done, wait until it cools down and then strain it. That’s it – your cannabis olive oil is ready to be used in other great peanut butter recipes.

Why should you make cannabis peanut butter? Well, first of all, it’s a great treat and you can enjoy it anytime you crave something sweet. But not only that, it’s also a great base for a lot of different things. If you have a jar of it in a freezer, you can easily make cookies, crunch bars, smoothies and more, all without any effort.