Categories
Uncategorized

We found Amanda from Cooked with Cannabis on Instagram: Check out the Netflix chef here! – Reality Titbit – Celebrity TV News

With all the free time many of us now have to spend at home, Netflix is proving one of the key ways to stay entertained. As they are currently blasting out new content like there’s no tomorrow, there will be plenty of shows to keep you occupied for the coming months.

One of their latest additions is Cooked with Cannabis, a cookery contest overseen by ‘Milkshake’ hitmaker Kelis and a rather curious cannabis loving chef named Leather – yes, that is his real name.

A standout contestant from the first three episodes was undeniably Amanda Jackson.

So, who is Chef Amanda? Find out about the Cooked with Cannabis star here, including more on what she’s up to now.

Screenshot: Cooked with Cannabis S1 E1 – Netflix

Who is Amanda?

Amanda C. Jackson is a 32-year-old chef and food writer originally from Vienna, Georgia.

After graduating from culinary school at Johnson & Wales University in Charlotte, North Carolina – and working part-time as a Chef de Cuisine – it didn’t take Amanda long to find her feet in the industry. First Amanda held the Executive Chef position at The Wine Loft in Tallahasee, Florida; she then moved to Sweet Grass Dairy in Thomasville, Georgia.

 

But the restaurant lifestyle got to Amanda and she traded in working at these restaurants for work as a private chef in Atlanta.

In 2017, Amanda decided to switch things up again and made the move to Long Beach, California to start her own business.

Amanda currently runs her namesake company, Chef Amanda & Co. On their website, they claim to be “an intention driven culinary arts firm.” This means they specialise in creating culinary artistry for all types of clients, from cooking demos to dinner parties, restaurant menu development and cooking classes!

  • SEE ALSO: Meet the guest judges from every Cooked with Cannabis episode

Amanda on Cooked with Cannabis

Amanda Jackson is one of the three chefs featured in episode 1 of Cooked with Cannabis. She competed in the first episode alongside Nate and Cynthia. Although Amanda impressed with her dishes, it was Nate who took home the prize at the end of the episode.

Amanda’s loss to Nate shocked many viewers and plenty have taken to Twitter to share their outrage at episode 1’s outcome.

One viewer tweeted: “This man won $10,000 making a freakin BURGER for his entree?!? Meanwhile our good sis Amanda made some BOMB Lambchops and lost”

Follow Amanda on Instagram

To find out more about Amanda, you can follow her on Instagram. We found her under the handle @chefamanda.co.

On her Instagram, Amanda’s bio reads that she creates “Culinary-centered experiences that intentionally feed the mind, body, & soul.”

Although Amanda already had quite the following on Instagram, her follower count has rocketed to over 11,000. She’s clearly one of the most popular chefs from this season!

WATCH COOKED WITH CANNABIS ON NETFLIX NOW

? AND GET FREAKY WITH US ON INSTAGRAM AND FACEBOOK

Have something to tell us about this article?

Let us know

Categories
Uncategorized

‘Cooked With Cannabis’ Host — Plus, Where Have You Seen Them Before? – Distractify


Who hosts ‘Cooked with Cannabis’?

As Cooked with Cannabis teases, “long are the days of pot brownies and marijuana cooking.” Indeed, cannabis cuisine has now ascended to the next level worldwide, given the rising ubiquity of marijuana.

The new Netflix show promises to be “the most fun-filled, fascinating, and mouth-watering competition series that gives a whole new meaning to the word ‘baked.'”

Leading the culinary series as hosts and judges are “Milkshake” singer and chef Kelis, and Portland’s chef and weed expert Leather Storrs, who’s been likened to the “Anthony Bourdain of cannabis.” 

Each Cooked with Cannabis episode features three professional chefs creating a three-course meal “based around themes that range from world cuisine to futurist food to the kind of weed-heavy holiday menu that could make even your least favorite uncle seem tolerable.”

cooked-with-cannabis-host-2-1587159552699.png
Source: netflix

$10,000 goes to the winning chef, who is selected by Kelis and Leather, as well as an ever-changing group of dinner guests who join to sample each course.

Food & Wine writes that we can expect appearances by former talk show host Ricki Lake and actress Mary Lynn Rajskub, as well as rappers Too $hort and El-P.

Leather tells the outlet that Cooked With Cannabis is a show “where weed is a seasoning rather than the reason.” “It’s granular, educational, heartfelt, and smart. The contestants had personal and romantic relationships with the herb and they knew its intricacies: medically, chemically, spiritually and as an intoxicant. Further, there was a real sense of community and camaraderie.”

As for Kelis, the “Milkshake” singer might be best known for her music, but she’s actually also a graduate of the famous and prestigious Le Cordon Bleu. 

“Food is revolutionary because it is the one and only international language,” she said in an interview with Bon Appetit last year. 

“It’s the most human thing you can partake in,” the singer-chef continued. “We are the only species that cooks.”

Since her culinary school days, Kelis has written a cookbook called My Life on a Plate: Recipes From Around the World, hosted specials on the Cooking Channel, released a 2014 album called Food (notable song titles: “Friday Fish Fry” and “Jerk Ribs”), and hosts a YouTube channel, Bounty Tube, where she makes her favorite recipes.

“The countdown begins for Cooked With Cannabis on Netflix,” Kelis captioned a drool-worthy photo on Instagram. “Set a reminder on your Netflix account … Tag me when you’re watching, I can’t wait for you all to see it!”

Cooked with Cannabis premieres on Netflix on 4/20, because of course.

Categories
Uncategorized

One of Legal Pot’s Early Bakers Reflects on the Growth of Edibles – Westword

Buying an edible doesn’t carry the same mystique that it did ten years ago, but much of that mystique involved nights curled in faded balls after biting off more “special” brownies than we could chew. Every edible eater has a rookie story, and Sweet Grass Kitchen founder Julie Berliner is no different. And she’s come a long way from having to sit in a corner at a friend’s wedding because the first weed cookie she tried tasted too good.
Berliner operates one of the state’s longest-running marijuana bakeries, which she recently sold to dispensary chain LivWell Enlightened Health, but she plans to continue leading the Sweet Grass brand. We recently caught up with Berliner to hear more stories and wisdom gained from over a decade in legal cannabis.

Westword: Compare the experience of eating an edible ten or fifteen years ago to now, with all of the science and testing available.

Marijuana Deals Near You

Julie Berliner: The first edible I ever purchased was at a medical dispensary on the Hill in Boulder. It was open from noon to 4:20 p.m., and of course it got shut down eventually over regulations. I bought a rice krispies treat, no label, covered in Saran Wrap. It was probably made in some dude’s dirty-ass kitchen — but I was excited! I was blown away by the idea that we could purchase something made with the intention of legal consumption, regardless of how far away it was from testing or being “safe.” That product was probably made the same day, or maybe the day before. That’s how it was when I started: I sold my cookies to dispensaries warm, the day I baked them. Compare that to now, when all products must go under testing to ensure they’re free of pesticides, are all homogeneous, and all the other things we now know about cannabis. 

Fresh-baked just doesn’t exist in cannabis right now, but I hope it does again one day. I’d love to be able to buy something warm in a bakery, and I say that knowing testing is a good thing for cannabis. But who wouldn’t love the choice of buying something packaged at a grocery store or something fresh behind the glass?

Even with the evolution that legal edibles have undergone, why do people still look at brownies as the quintessential edible?

The pot brownie is the staple, because it was the easiest thing to make at home before legalization. You can make your own cannabutter, and brownies are simple to make. That’s why they’re so symbolic. Since then, we’ve obviously come a long way, and there’s no limit to the products you’ll find in commercial settings. But I think brownies will always be the staple, because they were there during those grassroots movements. And they’re a nostalgic comfort food. They’re certainly not the only thing you can get anymore, though.

Do you think rookie freakouts that people can experience after eating too much of an edible during their first time still happen as often as they did five years ago?

My rookie story was at a wedding, and someone gave me a cookie. It probably had over 200 milligrams in it, and I ate a quarter of it. I ended up in the corner for the rest of the night, not being able to function.

I do think it still happens often, but not to the same extent. I think 10 milligrams is a lot for novice consumers. It’s a lot for me, and I’ve been eating edibles consistently for a long time. I’m a 2.5-milligram person, and I think most recreational consumers are in the same boat. Medical users are a different conversation.

It’s not like the Maureen Dowd story [in the New York Times] from 2014, but I’m sure it still happens, no doubt. There’s a social education around it now that I don’t think existed back then. And you had a lot of loud people who didn’t want to see cannabis succeed at the beginning, and edibles were the first to get the shitty spotlight. Now, maybe it’s vaping or pesticides.

Sweet Grass Kitchen founder Julie Berliner

Sweet Grass Kitchen founder Julie Berliner

Courtesy of Sweet Grass Kitchen

There’s so many different infusion techniques out there when it comes to cooking with cannabis, but what is the best way to do it, in your opinion?

Cannabutter is my favorite. It’s naturally high in fat and has a quick onset. But now, with all the advances and acceptance surrounding cannabis, there’s a ton of science behind other infusion methods. Before legalization, you couldn’t go to labs for this. Things are definitely changing.

Let’s say Julie Berliner from fifteen years ago wanted to start Sweet Grass today. Do you think she could? How different would that look?

The simple answer is no. There’s no state that is starting out how Colorado did, where you could just start cooking out of your kitchen and grow your business organically like I did. That just doesn’t exist in legal cannabis now. We were the guinea pigs, and we stumbled a lot, but it allowed this kind of opportunity. That stumbling showed other states what to do right from the start. It’s much more collaborative from a regulation standpoint. I don’t think it’ll ever be the same as it was back then, and I say that with a lot of nostalgia and pride — maybe more pride, because I’m proud of how far many of us have come.

The direction the industry has moved requires a lot more money than Sweet Grass could handle. There was not a world where I could take the business in a higher direction by myself, and that’s why I partnered with LivWell. That’s just how it is: You need money and operational experience.

What about Colorado cannabis has changed the most since 2012?

In 2009, during those early days, it wasn’t as respected and legitimate as it is now. It’s not just tie-dyes and bongs anymore. Interviews like this weren’t happening, and it was still very underground. It was really cool to be part of this as it happened, but the stigma was so ingrained, and my comfort talking about cannabis in public was very different. We were working toward normalization, and that’s what the movement has done. It’s an amazing product for people in a lot of different ways, and it’s doing wonders for our economy, especially right now.

Categories
Uncategorized

Meet the Cooked with Cannabis guest judges from each episode: Netflix’s 2020 cast! – Reality Titbit – Celebrity TV News

A brand new culinary competition dropped to Netflix on Monday, April 20th with a unique spin. Trained chefs with a speciality in cooking with cannabis come together to impress a panel of judges.

Each episode sees three chefs cook an impressive cannabis-infused three course meal, but only one can go through from each heat.

Not only do the chefs need to impress presenters and cooking experts Kelis and Leather Storrs, they need to impress a panel of celebrity judges in each episode.

So, who are the guest judges on Cooked with Cannabis? Find out about them here!

Screenshot: Cooked with Cannabis S1 E2 – Netflix

Who are the Cooked with Cannabis judges?

Singer-turned-chef Kelis fronts the show with weed connoisseur and culinary maestro Leather Storrs.

Kelis is probably best known for her 2004 Grammy Award-winning hit ‘Milkshake’ but has since gone on to develop her skills as a trained chefs. Any mistake won’t pass Kelis by, given her culinary training at the prestigious Le Cordon Bleu.

Leather is originally from Portland, Oregon and made his name working in L.A. kitchens throughout the late ’90s. When cannabis was legalised in Portland in 2014, Leather combined both his passions and embarked on a cannabis culinary adventure.

Screenshot: Cooked with Cannabis S1 E1 – Netflix

Episode 1 guest judges

The first line-up for Cooked with Cannabis season 1 is comprised of singer Elle King, and comedians Mary Lynn Rajskub, Ricki Lake, Jo Koy.

Elle King, also known as the daughter of comedy legend Rob Schneider, is behind mega hits such as 2014’s ‘Ex’s and Oh’s’.

You might recognise Mary Lynn from comedy classics like Dude, Where’s My Car? or even in TV drama 24, as she played Chloe O’Brian in the thriller.

Ricki Lake’s breakout role was as Tracy Turnblad in the 1988 production of Hairspray. However, she went on to be known for her own chat show which ran from 1993 to 2004.

Finally, Jo Koy is a stand-up comedian, who is likely to be known as one of the panellists featured on Chelsea Lately.

Who are the episode 2 guest judges?

Episode 2 sees even more comedic characters descend upon the Cooked with Cannabis studios as HaHa Davis, Sabrina Jalees, Bria Vinaite, Flula Borg appear as the guest judges.

HaHa Davis is a comedian best known for his work online, on platforms such as Instagram and Vine. Currently, HaHa has over 6.4 million followers on Instagram!

Canadian comedian Sabrina Jalees has largely worked behind-the-scenes – she was a writer for Canada’s Got Talent and a columnist for Toronto Star’s ID section – but now is in the limelight with her stand-up routine.

Lithuanian-American actress Bria rose to prominence following her breakout role in The Florida Project, for which she received numerous award nominations.

Completing the line-up is Flula Borg, a German actor, DJ and YouTuber.

  • NETFLIX PARTY: Play along with our Too Hot to Handle drinking game at home!

Meet the rest of season 1’s judging team

  • Michael Voltaggio
  • EL-P and Emily Panick
  • Too $hort
  • Nate Robinson
  • Megan Gailey
  • Clayton English
  • John Salley

Screenshot: Cooked with Cannabis S1 E5 – Netflix

  • Amanda Seales
  • Alaska Thunderf***
  • James Jones
  • Michael Rapaport
  • Jeff Dye
  • Mike E. Winfield
  • Brooks Wheelan
  • Jade Catta-Preta

WATCH COOKED WITH CANNABIS ON NETFLIX NOW

? AND GET FREAKY WITH US ON INSTAGRAM AND FACEBOOK

Have something to tell us about this article?

Let us know
Categories
Uncategorized

Chatting with Kelis About Her Buzzy New Netflix Show, ‘Cooked with Cannabis’ – Thrillist

Thrillist: What do you think makes for a winning cannabis dish?
Kelis: First and foremost, you want to make sure you have a good dish. You certainly want it to be inventive and you want it to taste good because it is a competition, but also as it relates to cannabis. It can come down to the strain of the flower that can compliment the flavor/ingredients of the dish.

What are the most common mistakes when it comes to cooking with cannabis?
Kelis:You really need to know what you’re doing to be able to balance the THC and CBD. You need an understanding of the process to heat the cannabis flower which activates the THC to give it the effects. If you do it wrong, you won’t be able to unlock the psychoactive properties and you will ruin the bud.

Cannabis seems like a tricky ingredient to work with because the flavor and smell can be so overpowering. What are the tricks and techniques that chefs need to come prepared with to excel on Cooked with Cannabis?
Kelis: Again, I think it comes down to the balance of the THC to CBD. So the level at which you hear the cannabis flower, the strain of the bud is important because you can select one that really compliments your dish. We had an amazing halibut ceviche on the show that was made with a “dream queen,” marijuana strain and had a hint of tropical in the bud which went really well with the dish.

In your experience, what is the best dish/vehicle to use it?
Kelis: I think sauces work really well. On the show we had someone make an amazing piri piri sauce, but I’ve had some amazing infused olive oils and butters that complimented everything really well.

How have both cannabis and food shaped your career?
Kelis: Well, I don’t know if I would say cannabis has shaped my career, per se. While I have cooked with cannabis before, I am NOT a cannabis chef, but as a chef and a believer in the cannabis plant, I was definitely interested in all that the plant has to offer as an ingredient. Food has definitely shaped my career. It has always been in my life. My mother was also a chef and really influenced me from an early age. Through music, I was able to travel and eat at so many amazing places that later informed my first cookbook, My Life On A Plate. Those travels also informed my desire to go to culinary school at Le Cordon Bleu, to start my sauce line Bounty & Full, and inspired my last album, FOOD.

What has it been like as a chef versus a musician?
Kelis: Going to culinary school and becoming a professional chef was one of the best decisions I ever made. It allowed me to formally train on something that I loved for so long. Coming from the music world, it certainly required me to prove myself a bit to other chefs, but it’s been great. I’ve launched my own sauce line, I’ve had food trucks at music festivals, I’ve done cooking demos, and hopefully one day, I’ll be able to open up my own restaurant!

How has growing up in New York in a diverse family sculpted your palate?
Kelis: Oh, it’s shaped so much. The food that I love and cook tends to be full of bold flavors. I like heat, international flavors, and bright colors. A lot of that came from my Afro-Latina background for sure and also from being able to walk down the street in NYC and have some amazing Jamaican food, Vietmanese, etc.

As a native New Yorker, what is the most iconic dish and/or restaurant in the city?
Kelis: Oh man… that’s so hard. Maybe pizza? Or, maybe an amazing bodega breakfast sandwich on a bagel.

We have to ask: did anyone on the show attempt to make a cannabis-infused milkshake?
Kelis: Ha! No… maybe next season!

Thanks for speaking with us, Kelis.

Categories
Uncategorized

Netflix’s ‘Cooked With Cannabis’ Will Be Next Level With Kelis and These Guest Judges – Distractify

Kelis and Leather will be accompanied by a different famous dinner guest in each episode, according to Food and Wine, and they will have the opportunity to sample each dish, and provide their opinions and commentary to help decide the episode’s winner. The winner will receive a cash prize of $10,000. 

The guest list is comprised of cannabis-friendly celebrities who have a palate for good food and tolerance for marijuana. Apparently, this season’s guest list is comprised of former talk show host and American actress, Ricki Lake, Hollywood actress and comedian, Mary Lynn Rajskub, Atypical’s Michael Rappaport, former basketball player John Salley, and rappers Too $hort and El-P. While we were definitely expecting Snoop to make an appearance, he may decide to come on next season… who knows?

Categories
Uncategorized

Netflix’s ‘Cooked With Cannabis’: Portland chef Leather Storrs helps judge weed-fueled cuisine in new show – OregonLive

Portland chefs turn up fairly regularly on TV cooking shows, whether they’re competing on “Top Chef” or showing off tasty treats on Guy Fieri’s “Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives.” But as judges in cooking shows devoted to using weed? That makes Leather Storrs, who made his name locally as the chef at Noble Rot restaurant, a bit unusual.

The new Netflix series, “Cooked With Cannabis” isn’t the first TV show to feature week-inspired cuisine. In fact, it’s the latest in a sort of mini-trend. To its credit, “Cooked With Cannabis” goes light on the stoner-with-the-munchies humor, and instead focuses on the ways that trained chefs — who also have an interest in weed — use THC infusions or CBD powders to add flavor and dimension to their dishes.

[embedded content]

Storrs, who has in recent years been pursuing a passion for cooking with cannabis, co-hosts “Cooked With Cannabis” with Kelis, who describes herself as a “singer, trained chef and cannabis queen.” In each episode, three chefs are challenged to prepare a three-course meal that incorporates and spotlights weed-fueled ingredients. The winner of the episode takes home $10,000 in prize money.

In addition to Kelis (who music fans will remember for her hit, “Milkshake”), and Storrs, “Cooked With Cannabis” each episode also includes guests who dig into the food and get progressively more high as the meal goes on.

In the first episode, for example, Ricki Lake shows off her apparent enthusiasm by recalling, her “last edible overdose experience,” where, as she says, “I had to be carried out of a restaurant.”

“Ricki, why?”, Mary Lynn Rakskub, the actress and comedian who’s also a guest, responds with mild alarm. “Why are you saying that?”

Storrs pays particular attention to how many milligrams of THC — which will make you high, as opposed to CBD — are included in the chef’s creations, and notes how careful the chefs are about giving diners a buzz.

The six episodes, all about a half-hour, each include a theme, such as grilling, “Global Eats,” wedding party fare, holiday dishes, and so on. The chefs use their imaginations to incorporate, for example, THC-infused olive oil, cannabis leaves, CBD-infused honey, or a weed-infused butter that, as Storrs says, “has that real funky, skunky character.”

Depending on your perspective, that may make you think, “Hey, that sounds great,” or “Never in a million years would I eat that.”

Though there’s good-natured goofing around from the celebrity guests (some more famous than others) and the big-voiced Storrs — who at one point brings out a fire extinguisher as the room fills up with smoke — “Cooked With Cannabis” doesn’t treat what the chefs are doing as a joke. So, if you’re wondering what to watch before the next episode of “Top Chef” comes on, you could do worse than getting a taste of “Cooked With Cannabis.”

Six episodes of “Cooked With Cannabis” are available to stream on Netflix.

— Kristi Turnquist

kturnquist@oregonian.com 503-221-8227 @Kristiturnquist

Subscribe to Oregonian/OregonLive newsletters and podcasts for the latest news and top stories.

Categories
Uncategorized

If it’s legal where you live, the ultimate homemade pot brownie is all about the cannabutter – The Washington Post

Overview

Several years ago, a friend offered to bake “the Cadillac of pot brownies” for my mother as she coped with the effects of chemotherapy. It was an act of compassion, made possible by medical-grade marijuana procured from my friend’s then-boyfriend, a doctor, and made extraordinary by the addition of Irish butter, Valrhona chocolate and the baking skills of my friend, a trained pastry chef.

Today, so much has changed, as cannabis has been legalized, to varying degrees, in a steadily growing number of states and Washington. In many places, you no longer need a friend with medical connections and pro-level skills to acquire excellent edibles: Plenty of high-end bakeries and dispensaries can meet the demand, not to mention delivery services for those isolating at home.

“Traditionally, people haven’t cared about how edibles taste,” says Diana Isaiou, proprietor of American Baked, a Seattle-based edibles bakery, and author of “High Tea,” a forthcoming book about sweet cannabis-infused edibles, including a particularly gooey brownie. (The original publication date, April 20, was delayed until September due to the coronavirus outbreak in China, where many books are printed.) “People’s attitudes are slowly changing.”

Increasingly, the worlds of gourmand and ganja have been colliding. Before the pandemic, diners could attend private high-end “cannabis dinners” or, in West Hollywood, restaurants allowing on-site cannabis consumption.

Luckily, they can learn to DIY via cookbooks such as “Bong Appetit” or the TV show of the same name, online tutorials from the likes of JeffThe420Chef or the Instagram stories of Monica Lo, a.k.a. Sous Weed. Of course, the functional ingredient matters — but consumers want edibles to be appetizing, too.

Humans have been eating cannabis for centuries, with the first recorded instance in China nearly 1,000 years ago, Robyn Griggs Lawrence wrote in her book “Pot in Pans: A History of Eating Cannabis.” While many cultures emphasized the nutritional and medicinal aspects of the plant, in Persia, where alcohol was prohibited, it was valued for its psychoactive effects. One way it was consumed, Lawrence notes, was rolled into majoun format: a Persian confection made using dates, nuts, cardamom and other spices.

That sweet crossed over into Western consciousness when American expatriate Alice B. Toklas took on the task of writing a cookbook. Battling hepatitis and in need of money at 74, Toklas reached out to her far-flung friends to contribute recipes. As a joke, Brion Gysin, a Canadian artist, poet and novelist living in Tangier, Morocco, sent a recipe for “Hashish Fudge.” The recipe bears a resemblance to the majoun (not fudge or brownies), calling for “a handful of stoned dates, dried figs, shelled almonds and peanuts,” plus sugar and butter, rolled into balls.

“Toklas either never bothered to read Gysin’s recipe in her haste, or didn’t know what cannabis, which Gysin spelled canibus, was,” Lawrence says. The “fudge” made it into the British edition of the book when it was published in 1954, though editors in New York kept it out of the U.S. edition. The scandalous recipe appears in the second edition released in the 1960s, probably based on the recipe’s popularity overseas.

The recipe morphed into brownie form thanks to “I Love You, Alice B. Toklas,” a 1968 Peter Sellers movie, Lawrence says. In the film’s pivotal scene, Nancy, a beautiful hippie with a butterfly tattoo, dumps her cannabis stash into the bowl of an electric mixer along with milk, eggs and a box of fudge brownie mix. The “groovy brownies” became part of the plot, and the pot brownie was born.

[embedded content]

That may be entertaining on screen, but it’s a terrible way to make a delicious pot brownie, Isaiou says. If you want the latter, she adds, you need to know one word: cannabutter. And you should live in a place where making it is legal.

In brief, cannabutter is butter that’s infused with cannabis that’s been toasted to activate the THC (a process called decarboxylation, or “decarbing” for short). Some cooks simmer butter and water mixed with cannabis on the stove top, while others prefer to sous vide; Isaiou favors a rice cooker for this step. The infused butter is cooled and strained; Isaiou goes an extra step and clarifies hers to a gheelike consistency. A second option is to mix cannabis extract into butter or another fat. (Note: In some states cannabutter is available for purchase, but for those who have time on their hands, it’s not a difficult project.)

Of course, pot brownies don’t have to be complicated, says Jessica Nelson, who runs the Fresh Fork Chef Services in Baltimore, which hosts cannabis dinners for patients with medicinal marijuana clearance.

Nelson favors a spiked variation on celebrity chef Alton Brown’s Cocoa Brownies, to which she adds espresso, a sprinkle of flaky sea salt and, of course, cannabutter. Yet, she also notes that among home bakers of edibles, Ghirardelli’s Double Chocolate Brownie Mix is a favored starting point.

Either way, “you should definitely start with a good recipe,” she says.

She credits medicinal marijuana activist Mary Jane Rathbun for emphasizing that same point: that pot brownies should taste good.

Although Rathbun, or “Brownie Mary,” never revealed her top-secret recipe, she was famed for baking dozens of pot brownies daily in her San Francisco kitchen and gifting them to those suffering from cancer and AIDS. She fought for the legalization of medical marijuana until her death in 1999.

In 1996, she co-authored a cookbook with fellow activist Dennis Peron: “Brownie Mary’s Marijuana Cookbook and Dennis Peron’s Recipe for Social Change.” Conspicuously missing: her brownie recipe.

While the recipe she described as “magically delicious” may be lost to history, critics at least are certain that her version was an actual brownie, not a majoun. In Lawrence’s book, she points to a 1992 incident in Sonoma County, where Rathbun was arrested by the Drug Enforcement Administration and local law officials while making brownies at a friend’s house and charged with felony possession. The officers reported confiscating 20 pounds of high-grade cannabis, along with 50 pounds of flour and sugar, 22 dozen eggs and 35 pounds of margarine.

Any ardent baker will identify with her outrage; Rathbun was insulted that the police suggested she used margarine in her precious brownies. “The narcs may not know any better,” she fumed, as reported in her obituary in The Guardian, “but that was the finest quality butter.”

Newman is contributing spirits editor at Wine Enthusiast and author of several books, including “Cocktails With a Twist.”

NOTE: The Washington Post does not condone illicit drug use, so this recipe should be made only by those who live where it is legal do so. This recipe uses 1/4 cup cannabutter, which should have 263 milligrams THC. This means each 2-inch brownie square has about 11 milligrams THC.

Storage Notes: The brownies taste even better the next day and keep well if tightly wrapped. They can be refrigerated for up to 1 week or frozen, tightly wrapped, for up to 3 months. The cannabutter can be refrigerated for up to 1 month or frozen for up to 1 year.


Ingredients

For the cannabutter:

10 grams cannabis

4 cups (960 milliliters) water

2 1/2 sticks (10 ounces/284 grams) unsalted European-style butter

For the brownies:

1 stick (4 ounces/113 grams) unsalted butter

1/4 cup (57 grams) cannabutter

12 ounces (340 grams) bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped

1 cup (213 grams) packed light brown sugar

3/4 cup (150 grams) granulated sugar

1 teaspoon fine sea salt

4 large eggs

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

3/4 cup (90 grams) all-purpose flour


Steps

Step 1

Make the cannabutter: Position the rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 250 degrees. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Using your hands or kitchen shears, break the cannabis into small pieces or grind it coarsely in a food processor. Place the cannabis on the baking sheet. Place the baking sheet in the oven and toast the cannabis for 30 minutes, until very dry.

Step 2

In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine the cannabis with the water and butter. Bring to a boil, then decrease the heat so the mixture is at a very low simmer and cook for 3 hours, infusing the butter. Check and replenish the water as it evaporates — it is important to keep an 1 inch or so of water on the bottom of the pan as it cooks. Remove from the heat and let cool for about 30 minutes.

Step 3

Strain the mixture through cheesecloth or a fine-mesh sieve placed over a large bowl, pressing on the solids to extract all the butter and liquid from the cannabis (discard the spent cannabis). Refrigerate the liquid for at least 45 minutes, until the butter has solidified. Then, lift the solid layer of butter from the murky water and discard the water. Using paper towels, pat the butter until dry. Use immediately, or cover and refrigerate, or freeze until needed. Label that the container contains cannabis.

Step 4

Make the brownies: Position a baking rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 350 degrees. Lightly butter or spray a 9-by-13-inch baking pan.

Step 5

In a medium heavy-bottomed saucepan over low heat, melt the butter and cannabutter. Add the chocolate and stir until it has just about melted. Add the brown sugar, granulated sugar and salt, and stir until thoroughly combined. Remove from the heat, set aside and let cool slightly. The chocolate should melt from the residual heat.

Step 6

In a large bowl, whisk the eggs until foamy, then whisk in the vanilla.

Step 7

Whisk the warm chocolate mixture into the eggs. (If the chocolate is too hot, it will scramble your eggs; you should be able to touch the chocolate with your fingertip and not be uncomfortable.)

Step 8

Whisk the flour gently into the egg mixture just until combined, and no clumps of flour remain (do not overmix). The batter will be thick.

Step 9

Pour the batter into prepared pan. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until the top just starts to crack and is glossy. Remove from the oven and cool completely on a wire rack before cutting. Be sure to mark that these have cannabis in them.

Adapted from “High Tea: Cannabis Cakes, Tarts and Bakes” by Diana Isaiou (Smith Street Books, September 2020)

Tested by Rebekah Yonan; email questions to voraciously@washpost.com.

Scale and get a printer-friendly version of the recipe here.

Did you make this recipe? Take a photo and tag us on Instagram with #eatvoraciously.

Nutrition

Calories: 218; Total Fat: 13 g; Saturated Fat: 8 g; Cholesterol: 46 mg; Sodium: 110 mg; Carbohydrates: 23 g; Dietary Fiber: 2 g; Sugars: 17 g; Protein: 2 g.

Categories
Uncategorized

Your Xbox Series X Is Not a Vape, Says Microsoft – Highsnobiety

With the general public’s stance on marijuana decidedly different than it was a decade ago thanks to changes throughout the US, allowing both medical and recreational usages in various states, a happy byproduct is that we have better information than ever when it comes to making weed edibles — a delivery system that continues to reinvent the way that people get high.

While weed edibles these days run the gamut from Thanksgiving recipes to cupcakes, there is no denying that baking cookies or brownies remains an all-time classic. However, knowing how to make edibles requires a certain amount of knowledge, both of cooking and marijuana, to craft the perfect batch.

After all, people are looking for something that both tastes good and is potent. Unfortunately, you can’t get that by simply slapping some pre-bought mix on a cookie sheet, adding crumbled weed, and lobbing it in the oven. Never fear, though. We’ve got you covered when it comes to how to make weed edibles and the perfect edibles recipe.

The actual items you need

So you’ve got some weed and want to start making edibles. That’s a good start. In fact, many might be more at ease handling the marijuana aspect of this gambit than the cooking. But rather than think of your weed edible’s potency as the number one goal, instead think of getting some quality chocolate, such as Guittard or Scharffen Berger.

From there, you’ll want to also pick up six large eggs, two sticks of unsalted butter, vanilla extract, sugar, all-purpose flour, baking powder, and kosher salt. From a utilitarian perspective, you’ll also need a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper, a weed grinder, food processor, wooden spoon, cheesecloth, and two large pots.

Still with me? Good. Then let’s learn how to make edibles so that these weed cookies can eventually turn into weed cake in the future.

Pick your strain

Like with junk food, picking the right strain for making edibles depends on the mood you’re in and the social situation you’re planning for. A simple question to ask is, “Daytime cookie or nighttime cookie?” Although weed impacts everyone differently, sativas give users energy and indicas are better for relaxation and sleep.

Want your cookies to make you want to get up and conquer the world? We suggest Sour Diesel, White Widow, Casey Jones, Golden Goat, or Lemon Skunk. But if you prefer something for you, your Netflix account, and a planned rendezvous with your bed, opt for strains like Bubba Kush, Granddaddy Purple, or White Fire Alien OG.

Decarboxylation

There’s a reason why marijuana is most commonly smoked rather than eaten. Without heating it up or burning it, raw weed is actually non-psychoactive, chock full of THCA, and actually considered a “superfood” by some, who note 400 different chemical compounds inside the plant, including vitamins, essential oils, and acids.

Thus, to begin the weed edible process, a chef must prepare the weed so the elements that make a person feel high are present in the pastry. As High Times noted, “If you want to get high, you’ll need to cook it, and you’ll need to do it right so you don’t waste it.”

The boiling temperature for THC is 314ºF, and heating your cannabis too much for too long will result in lowered potency. The process itself, however, is rather straightforward:

1. Preheat your oven to 240ºF. If you have an oven thermometer to gauge the oven’s true temperature, even better.

2. Break the leaf down into more manageable pieces and place on a cookie sheet as if toasting spices. Don’t overload the marijuana so pieces are on top of each other.

3. Put the sheet in the oven and monitor for 30-40 minutes (depending on oven strength and the strain of weed). You’re looking for a golden brown color as opposed to the more vibrant green of an untoasted leaf.

4. Take out of the oven and let the toasted marijuana cool. Then put the weed in a food processor and pulse it for a second so it is ground coarsely.

Infusion

With a major step out of the way, it’s time to make “cannabutter,” infusing your active marijuana into a food perfect for baking: butter. While there are numerous methods for achieving this, some of which take up to eight hours, here is a wafer-simmered version that is both simple and heralded by The Cannabist as the best cannabutter in the US.

In a medium-sized saucepan, bring a quart of water to the boil on the stove. Once boiling, add your sticks of butter and allow them to melt completely. After that, add your marijuana and reduce the heat to simmer. The real key here is that the weed should always be floating about 1.5 to 2 inches from the bottom of the pan. The butter should cook at a low heat for three hours until the mixture starts to get thick at the top.

From there, you’re nearly finished. Take the mixture and place it in a bowl lined with cheesecloth. Then squeeze out the remaining liquid butter. After allowing the liquid butter to cool for an hour, put it in the fridge until it takes on the consistency and texture of a spread.

We swear we’re almost to the part where you can actually eat your weed edible.

How much weed do you need for edibles?

Although marijuana strains differ in potency, it’s safe to assume that the average version is about 10 percent THC.

Let’s suppose you have a quarter-ounce of marijuana, which is 7 grams. According to The Cannabist, “Every 1 gram of cannabis bud has 1,000mg of dry weight. If a strain has about 10 percent THC, 10 percent of 1,000mg would be 100mg. So for cooking or baking at home, it’s safe to assume that a gram of cannabis contains at least 100mg of THC.”

For further context, in the 420-friendly state of Colorado, it has been mandated that the serving size for weed edibles is 10mg of THC. In the scenario detailed above, a chef has 700mg. A classic cookie recipe yields 60 cookies. Thus, each cookie would have just over 11 grams. First-time users learning how to make weed edibles should cut theirs into quarters, and allow an hour between each dose.

SOS

If you screw up the math and eat way too much of your freshly cooked weed edible — don’t worry, it happens to everyone — there’s no need to panic. But there are a few things you might want to have on hand to bring you down a bit.

According to the British Journal of Pharmacology, people can try to curb their high by consuming pistachios or pine nuts, which contain pinene, a chemical that helps with mental clarity. Additionally, eating the citrus acid found in lemons, oranges, and grapefruits can help, thanks to the terpenes contained inside.

And there you have it. The best tricks we have to offer for making edibles. Okay, okay — one more for the road…

Bonus

Perhaps you’re someone who prefers salty snacks over savory ones. Well, you’re in luck. Popcorn has become a go-to choice for edibles in recent years and is simple to make if you’ve already created your cannabutter using the above method.

But before you go shoving your weed in your microwave, it’s important to note that you’ll be making popcorn the old-fashioned way using unpopped kernels heated in a saucepan. Simply combine two or three cups of kernels with two tablespoons of coconut oil and two tablespoons of cannabutter, add salt and pepper for taste, et voila, you’ve got “potcorn.”

And there’s even more good news. Popcorn has more antioxidants than some fruits and vegetables. So now you know how to make an edible, you can use it to get healthy. Kind of.

If you want a deeper dive into the topic of weed, watch the video below.

 

Categories
Uncategorized

Fashion Editors: Meet 10 of the World’s Best | Highsnobiety – Highsnobiety

With the general public’s stance on marijuana decidedly different than it was a decade ago thanks to changes throughout the US, allowing both medical and recreational usages in various states, a happy byproduct is that we have better information than ever when it comes to making weed edibles — a delivery system that continues to reinvent the way that people get high.

While weed edibles these days run the gamut from Thanksgiving recipes to cupcakes, there is no denying that baking cookies or brownies remains an all-time classic. However, knowing how to make edibles requires a certain amount of knowledge, both of cooking and marijuana, to craft the perfect batch.

After all, people are looking for something that both tastes good and is potent. Unfortunately, you can’t get that by simply slapping some pre-bought mix on a cookie sheet, adding crumbled weed, and lobbing it in the oven. Never fear, though. We’ve got you covered when it comes to how to make weed edibles and the perfect edibles recipe.

The actual items you need

So you’ve got some weed and want to start making edibles. That’s a good start. In fact, many might be more at ease handling the marijuana aspect of this gambit than the cooking. But rather than think of your weed edible’s potency as the number one goal, instead think of getting some quality chocolate, such as Guittard or Scharffen Berger.

From there, you’ll want to also pick up six large eggs, two sticks of unsalted butter, vanilla extract, sugar, all-purpose flour, baking powder, and kosher salt. From a utilitarian perspective, you’ll also need a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper, a weed grinder, food processor, wooden spoon, cheesecloth, and two large pots.

Still with me? Good. Then let’s learn how to make edibles so that these weed cookies can eventually turn into weed cake in the future.

Pick your strain

Like with junk food, picking the right strain for making edibles depends on the mood you’re in and the social situation you’re planning for. A simple question to ask is, “Daytime cookie or nighttime cookie?” Although weed impacts everyone differently, sativas give users energy and indicas are better for relaxation and sleep.

Want your cookies to make you want to get up and conquer the world? We suggest Sour Diesel, White Widow, Casey Jones, Golden Goat, or Lemon Skunk. But if you prefer something for you, your Netflix account, and a planned rendezvous with your bed, opt for strains like Bubba Kush, Granddaddy Purple, or White Fire Alien OG.

Decarboxylation

There’s a reason why marijuana is most commonly smoked rather than eaten. Without heating it up or burning it, raw weed is actually non-psychoactive, chock full of THCA, and actually considered a “superfood” by some, who note 400 different chemical compounds inside the plant, including vitamins, essential oils, and acids.

Thus, to begin the weed edible process, a chef must prepare the weed so the elements that make a person feel high are present in the pastry. As High Times noted, “If you want to get high, you’ll need to cook it, and you’ll need to do it right so you don’t waste it.”

The boiling temperature for THC is 314ºF, and heating your cannabis too much for too long will result in lowered potency. The process itself, however, is rather straightforward:

1. Preheat your oven to 240ºF. If you have an oven thermometer to gauge the oven’s true temperature, even better.

2. Break the leaf down into more manageable pieces and place on a cookie sheet as if toasting spices. Don’t overload the marijuana so pieces are on top of each other.

3. Put the sheet in the oven and monitor for 30-40 minutes (depending on oven strength and the strain of weed). You’re looking for a golden brown color as opposed to the more vibrant green of an untoasted leaf.

4. Take out of the oven and let the toasted marijuana cool. Then put the weed in a food processor and pulse it for a second so it is ground coarsely.

Infusion

With a major step out of the way, it’s time to make “cannabutter,” infusing your active marijuana into a food perfect for baking: butter. While there are numerous methods for achieving this, some of which take up to eight hours, here is a wafer-simmered version that is both simple and heralded by The Cannabist as the best cannabutter in the US.

In a medium-sized saucepan, bring a quart of water to the boil on the stove. Once boiling, add your sticks of butter and allow them to melt completely. After that, add your marijuana and reduce the heat to simmer. The real key here is that the weed should always be floating about 1.5 to 2 inches from the bottom of the pan. The butter should cook at a low heat for three hours until the mixture starts to get thick at the top.

From there, you’re nearly finished. Take the mixture and place it in a bowl lined with cheesecloth. Then squeeze out the remaining liquid butter. After allowing the liquid butter to cool for an hour, put it in the fridge until it takes on the consistency and texture of a spread.

We swear we’re almost to the part where you can actually eat your weed edible.

How much weed do you need for edibles?

Although marijuana strains differ in potency, it’s safe to assume that the average version is about 10 percent THC.

Let’s suppose you have a quarter-ounce of marijuana, which is 7 grams. According to The Cannabist, “Every 1 gram of cannabis bud has 1,000mg of dry weight. If a strain has about 10 percent THC, 10 percent of 1,000mg would be 100mg. So for cooking or baking at home, it’s safe to assume that a gram of cannabis contains at least 100mg of THC.”

For further context, in the 420-friendly state of Colorado, it has been mandated that the serving size for weed edibles is 10mg of THC. In the scenario detailed above, a chef has 700mg. A classic cookie recipe yields 60 cookies. Thus, each cookie would have just over 11 grams. First-time users learning how to make weed edibles should cut theirs into quarters, and allow an hour between each dose.

SOS

If you screw up the math and eat way too much of your freshly cooked weed edible — don’t worry, it happens to everyone — there’s no need to panic. But there are a few things you might want to have on hand to bring you down a bit.

According to the British Journal of Pharmacology, people can try to curb their high by consuming pistachios or pine nuts, which contain pinene, a chemical that helps with mental clarity. Additionally, eating the citrus acid found in lemons, oranges, and grapefruits can help, thanks to the terpenes contained inside.

And there you have it. The best tricks we have to offer for making edibles. Okay, okay — one more for the road…

Bonus

Perhaps you’re someone who prefers salty snacks over savory ones. Well, you’re in luck. Popcorn has become a go-to choice for edibles in recent years and is simple to make if you’ve already created your cannabutter using the above method.

But before you go shoving your weed in your microwave, it’s important to note that you’ll be making popcorn the old-fashioned way using unpopped kernels heated in a saucepan. Simply combine two or three cups of kernels with two tablespoons of coconut oil and two tablespoons of cannabutter, add salt and pepper for taste, et voila, you’ve got “potcorn.”

And there’s even more good news. Popcorn has more antioxidants than some fruits and vegetables. So now you know how to make an edible, you can use it to get healthy. Kind of.

If you want a deeper dive into the topic of weed, watch the video below.