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‘Cooked With Cannabis’ Host — Plus, Where Have You Seen Them Before? – Distractify


Who hosts ‘Cooked with Cannabis’?

As Cooked with Cannabis teases, “long are the days of pot brownies and marijuana cooking.” Indeed, cannabis cuisine has now ascended to the next level worldwide, given the rising ubiquity of marijuana.

The new Netflix show promises to be “the most fun-filled, fascinating, and mouth-watering competition series that gives a whole new meaning to the word ‘baked.'”

Leading the culinary series as hosts and judges are “Milkshake” singer and chef Kelis, and Portland’s chef and weed expert Leather Storrs, who’s been likened to the “Anthony Bourdain of cannabis.” 

Each Cooked with Cannabis episode features three professional chefs creating a three-course meal “based around themes that range from world cuisine to futurist food to the kind of weed-heavy holiday menu that could make even your least favorite uncle seem tolerable.”

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Source: netflix

$10,000 goes to the winning chef, who is selected by Kelis and Leather, as well as an ever-changing group of dinner guests who join to sample each course.

Food & Wine writes that we can expect appearances by former talk show host Ricki Lake and actress Mary Lynn Rajskub, as well as rappers Too $hort and El-P.

Leather tells the outlet that Cooked With Cannabis is a show “where weed is a seasoning rather than the reason.” “It’s granular, educational, heartfelt, and smart. The contestants had personal and romantic relationships with the herb and they knew its intricacies: medically, chemically, spiritually and as an intoxicant. Further, there was a real sense of community and camaraderie.”

As for Kelis, the “Milkshake” singer might be best known for her music, but she’s actually also a graduate of the famous and prestigious Le Cordon Bleu. 

“Food is revolutionary because it is the one and only international language,” she said in an interview with Bon Appetit last year. 

“It’s the most human thing you can partake in,” the singer-chef continued. “We are the only species that cooks.”

Since her culinary school days, Kelis has written a cookbook called My Life on a Plate: Recipes From Around the World, hosted specials on the Cooking Channel, released a 2014 album called Food (notable song titles: “Friday Fish Fry” and “Jerk Ribs”), and hosts a YouTube channel, Bounty Tube, where she makes her favorite recipes.

“The countdown begins for Cooked With Cannabis on Netflix,” Kelis captioned a drool-worthy photo on Instagram. “Set a reminder on your Netflix account … Tag me when you’re watching, I can’t wait for you all to see it!”

Cooked with Cannabis premieres on Netflix on 4/20, because of course.

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One of Legal Pot’s Early Bakers Reflects on the Growth of Edibles – Westword

Buying an edible doesn’t carry the same mystique that it did ten years ago, but much of that mystique involved nights curled in faded balls after biting off more “special” brownies than we could chew. Every edible eater has a rookie story, and Sweet Grass Kitchen founder Julie Berliner is no different. And she’s come a long way from having to sit in a corner at a friend’s wedding because the first weed cookie she tried tasted too good.
Berliner operates one of the state’s longest-running marijuana bakeries, which she recently sold to dispensary chain LivWell Enlightened Health, but she plans to continue leading the Sweet Grass brand. We recently caught up with Berliner to hear more stories and wisdom gained from over a decade in legal cannabis.

Westword: Compare the experience of eating an edible ten or fifteen years ago to now, with all of the science and testing available.

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Julie Berliner: The first edible I ever purchased was at a medical dispensary on the Hill in Boulder. It was open from noon to 4:20 p.m., and of course it got shut down eventually over regulations. I bought a rice krispies treat, no label, covered in Saran Wrap. It was probably made in some dude’s dirty-ass kitchen — but I was excited! I was blown away by the idea that we could purchase something made with the intention of legal consumption, regardless of how far away it was from testing or being “safe.” That product was probably made the same day, or maybe the day before. That’s how it was when I started: I sold my cookies to dispensaries warm, the day I baked them. Compare that to now, when all products must go under testing to ensure they’re free of pesticides, are all homogeneous, and all the other things we now know about cannabis. 

Fresh-baked just doesn’t exist in cannabis right now, but I hope it does again one day. I’d love to be able to buy something warm in a bakery, and I say that knowing testing is a good thing for cannabis. But who wouldn’t love the choice of buying something packaged at a grocery store or something fresh behind the glass?

Even with the evolution that legal edibles have undergone, why do people still look at brownies as the quintessential edible?

The pot brownie is the staple, because it was the easiest thing to make at home before legalization. You can make your own cannabutter, and brownies are simple to make. That’s why they’re so symbolic. Since then, we’ve obviously come a long way, and there’s no limit to the products you’ll find in commercial settings. But I think brownies will always be the staple, because they were there during those grassroots movements. And they’re a nostalgic comfort food. They’re certainly not the only thing you can get anymore, though.

Do you think rookie freakouts that people can experience after eating too much of an edible during their first time still happen as often as they did five years ago?

My rookie story was at a wedding, and someone gave me a cookie. It probably had over 200 milligrams in it, and I ate a quarter of it. I ended up in the corner for the rest of the night, not being able to function.

I do think it still happens often, but not to the same extent. I think 10 milligrams is a lot for novice consumers. It’s a lot for me, and I’ve been eating edibles consistently for a long time. I’m a 2.5-milligram person, and I think most recreational consumers are in the same boat. Medical users are a different conversation.

It’s not like the Maureen Dowd story [in the New York Times] from 2014, but I’m sure it still happens, no doubt. There’s a social education around it now that I don’t think existed back then. And you had a lot of loud people who didn’t want to see cannabis succeed at the beginning, and edibles were the first to get the shitty spotlight. Now, maybe it’s vaping or pesticides.

Sweet Grass Kitchen founder Julie Berliner

Sweet Grass Kitchen founder Julie Berliner

Courtesy of Sweet Grass Kitchen

There’s so many different infusion techniques out there when it comes to cooking with cannabis, but what is the best way to do it, in your opinion?

Cannabutter is my favorite. It’s naturally high in fat and has a quick onset. But now, with all the advances and acceptance surrounding cannabis, there’s a ton of science behind other infusion methods. Before legalization, you couldn’t go to labs for this. Things are definitely changing.

Let’s say Julie Berliner from fifteen years ago wanted to start Sweet Grass today. Do you think she could? How different would that look?

The simple answer is no. There’s no state that is starting out how Colorado did, where you could just start cooking out of your kitchen and grow your business organically like I did. That just doesn’t exist in legal cannabis now. We were the guinea pigs, and we stumbled a lot, but it allowed this kind of opportunity. That stumbling showed other states what to do right from the start. It’s much more collaborative from a regulation standpoint. I don’t think it’ll ever be the same as it was back then, and I say that with a lot of nostalgia and pride — maybe more pride, because I’m proud of how far many of us have come.

The direction the industry has moved requires a lot more money than Sweet Grass could handle. There was not a world where I could take the business in a higher direction by myself, and that’s why I partnered with LivWell. That’s just how it is: You need money and operational experience.

What about Colorado cannabis has changed the most since 2012?

In 2009, during those early days, it wasn’t as respected and legitimate as it is now. It’s not just tie-dyes and bongs anymore. Interviews like this weren’t happening, and it was still very underground. It was really cool to be part of this as it happened, but the stigma was so ingrained, and my comfort talking about cannabis in public was very different. We were working toward normalization, and that’s what the movement has done. It’s an amazing product for people in a lot of different ways, and it’s doing wonders for our economy, especially right now.

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Chatting with Kelis About Her Buzzy New Netflix Show, ‘Cooked with Cannabis’ – Thrillist

Thrillist: What do you think makes for a winning cannabis dish?
Kelis: First and foremost, you want to make sure you have a good dish. You certainly want it to be inventive and you want it to taste good because it is a competition, but also as it relates to cannabis. It can come down to the strain of the flower that can compliment the flavor/ingredients of the dish.

What are the most common mistakes when it comes to cooking with cannabis?
Kelis:You really need to know what you’re doing to be able to balance the THC and CBD. You need an understanding of the process to heat the cannabis flower which activates the THC to give it the effects. If you do it wrong, you won’t be able to unlock the psychoactive properties and you will ruin the bud.

Cannabis seems like a tricky ingredient to work with because the flavor and smell can be so overpowering. What are the tricks and techniques that chefs need to come prepared with to excel on Cooked with Cannabis?
Kelis: Again, I think it comes down to the balance of the THC to CBD. So the level at which you hear the cannabis flower, the strain of the bud is important because you can select one that really compliments your dish. We had an amazing halibut ceviche on the show that was made with a “dream queen,” marijuana strain and had a hint of tropical in the bud which went really well with the dish.

In your experience, what is the best dish/vehicle to use it?
Kelis: I think sauces work really well. On the show we had someone make an amazing piri piri sauce, but I’ve had some amazing infused olive oils and butters that complimented everything really well.

How have both cannabis and food shaped your career?
Kelis: Well, I don’t know if I would say cannabis has shaped my career, per se. While I have cooked with cannabis before, I am NOT a cannabis chef, but as a chef and a believer in the cannabis plant, I was definitely interested in all that the plant has to offer as an ingredient. Food has definitely shaped my career. It has always been in my life. My mother was also a chef and really influenced me from an early age. Through music, I was able to travel and eat at so many amazing places that later informed my first cookbook, My Life On A Plate. Those travels also informed my desire to go to culinary school at Le Cordon Bleu, to start my sauce line Bounty & Full, and inspired my last album, FOOD.

What has it been like as a chef versus a musician?
Kelis: Going to culinary school and becoming a professional chef was one of the best decisions I ever made. It allowed me to formally train on something that I loved for so long. Coming from the music world, it certainly required me to prove myself a bit to other chefs, but it’s been great. I’ve launched my own sauce line, I’ve had food trucks at music festivals, I’ve done cooking demos, and hopefully one day, I’ll be able to open up my own restaurant!

How has growing up in New York in a diverse family sculpted your palate?
Kelis: Oh, it’s shaped so much. The food that I love and cook tends to be full of bold flavors. I like heat, international flavors, and bright colors. A lot of that came from my Afro-Latina background for sure and also from being able to walk down the street in NYC and have some amazing Jamaican food, Vietmanese, etc.

As a native New Yorker, what is the most iconic dish and/or restaurant in the city?
Kelis: Oh man… that’s so hard. Maybe pizza? Or, maybe an amazing bodega breakfast sandwich on a bagel.

We have to ask: did anyone on the show attempt to make a cannabis-infused milkshake?
Kelis: Ha! No… maybe next season!

Thanks for speaking with us, Kelis.

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Netflix’s ‘Cooked With Cannabis’ Will Be Next Level With Kelis and These Guest Judges – Distractify

Kelis and Leather will be accompanied by a different famous dinner guest in each episode, according to Food and Wine, and they will have the opportunity to sample each dish, and provide their opinions and commentary to help decide the episode’s winner. The winner will receive a cash prize of $10,000. 

The guest list is comprised of cannabis-friendly celebrities who have a palate for good food and tolerance for marijuana. Apparently, this season’s guest list is comprised of former talk show host and American actress, Ricki Lake, Hollywood actress and comedian, Mary Lynn Rajskub, Atypical’s Michael Rappaport, former basketball player John Salley, and rappers Too $hort and El-P. While we were definitely expecting Snoop to make an appearance, he may decide to come on next season… who knows?

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Netflix’s ‘Cooked With Cannabis’: Portland chef Leather Storrs helps judge weed-fueled cuisine in new show – OregonLive

Portland chefs turn up fairly regularly on TV cooking shows, whether they’re competing on “Top Chef” or showing off tasty treats on Guy Fieri’s “Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives.” But as judges in cooking shows devoted to using weed? That makes Leather Storrs, who made his name locally as the chef at Noble Rot restaurant, a bit unusual.

The new Netflix series, “Cooked With Cannabis” isn’t the first TV show to feature week-inspired cuisine. In fact, it’s the latest in a sort of mini-trend. To its credit, “Cooked With Cannabis” goes light on the stoner-with-the-munchies humor, and instead focuses on the ways that trained chefs — who also have an interest in weed — use THC infusions or CBD powders to add flavor and dimension to their dishes.

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Storrs, who has in recent years been pursuing a passion for cooking with cannabis, co-hosts “Cooked With Cannabis” with Kelis, who describes herself as a “singer, trained chef and cannabis queen.” In each episode, three chefs are challenged to prepare a three-course meal that incorporates and spotlights weed-fueled ingredients. The winner of the episode takes home $10,000 in prize money.

In addition to Kelis (who music fans will remember for her hit, “Milkshake”), and Storrs, “Cooked With Cannabis” each episode also includes guests who dig into the food and get progressively more high as the meal goes on.

In the first episode, for example, Ricki Lake shows off her apparent enthusiasm by recalling, her “last edible overdose experience,” where, as she says, “I had to be carried out of a restaurant.”

“Ricki, why?”, Mary Lynn Rakskub, the actress and comedian who’s also a guest, responds with mild alarm. “Why are you saying that?”

Storrs pays particular attention to how many milligrams of THC — which will make you high, as opposed to CBD — are included in the chef’s creations, and notes how careful the chefs are about giving diners a buzz.

The six episodes, all about a half-hour, each include a theme, such as grilling, “Global Eats,” wedding party fare, holiday dishes, and so on. The chefs use their imaginations to incorporate, for example, THC-infused olive oil, cannabis leaves, CBD-infused honey, or a weed-infused butter that, as Storrs says, “has that real funky, skunky character.”

Depending on your perspective, that may make you think, “Hey, that sounds great,” or “Never in a million years would I eat that.”

Though there’s good-natured goofing around from the celebrity guests (some more famous than others) and the big-voiced Storrs — who at one point brings out a fire extinguisher as the room fills up with smoke — “Cooked With Cannabis” doesn’t treat what the chefs are doing as a joke. So, if you’re wondering what to watch before the next episode of “Top Chef” comes on, you could do worse than getting a taste of “Cooked With Cannabis.”

Six episodes of “Cooked With Cannabis” are available to stream on Netflix.

— Kristi Turnquist

kturnquist@oregonian.com 503-221-8227 @Kristiturnquist

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If it’s legal where you live, the ultimate homemade pot brownie is all about the cannabutter – The Washington Post

Overview

Several years ago, a friend offered to bake “the Cadillac of pot brownies” for my mother as she coped with the effects of chemotherapy. It was an act of compassion, made possible by medical-grade marijuana procured from my friend’s then-boyfriend, a doctor, and made extraordinary by the addition of Irish butter, Valrhona chocolate and the baking skills of my friend, a trained pastry chef.

Today, so much has changed, as cannabis has been legalized, to varying degrees, in a steadily growing number of states and Washington. In many places, you no longer need a friend with medical connections and pro-level skills to acquire excellent edibles: Plenty of high-end bakeries and dispensaries can meet the demand, not to mention delivery services for those isolating at home.

“Traditionally, people haven’t cared about how edibles taste,” says Diana Isaiou, proprietor of American Baked, a Seattle-based edibles bakery, and author of “High Tea,” a forthcoming book about sweet cannabis-infused edibles, including a particularly gooey brownie. (The original publication date, April 20, was delayed until September due to the coronavirus outbreak in China, where many books are printed.) “People’s attitudes are slowly changing.”

Increasingly, the worlds of gourmand and ganja have been colliding. Before the pandemic, diners could attend private high-end “cannabis dinners” or, in West Hollywood, restaurants allowing on-site cannabis consumption.

Luckily, they can learn to DIY via cookbooks such as “Bong Appetit” or the TV show of the same name, online tutorials from the likes of JeffThe420Chef or the Instagram stories of Monica Lo, a.k.a. Sous Weed. Of course, the functional ingredient matters — but consumers want edibles to be appetizing, too.

Humans have been eating cannabis for centuries, with the first recorded instance in China nearly 1,000 years ago, Robyn Griggs Lawrence wrote in her book “Pot in Pans: A History of Eating Cannabis.” While many cultures emphasized the nutritional and medicinal aspects of the plant, in Persia, where alcohol was prohibited, it was valued for its psychoactive effects. One way it was consumed, Lawrence notes, was rolled into majoun format: a Persian confection made using dates, nuts, cardamom and other spices.

That sweet crossed over into Western consciousness when American expatriate Alice B. Toklas took on the task of writing a cookbook. Battling hepatitis and in need of money at 74, Toklas reached out to her far-flung friends to contribute recipes. As a joke, Brion Gysin, a Canadian artist, poet and novelist living in Tangier, Morocco, sent a recipe for “Hashish Fudge.” The recipe bears a resemblance to the majoun (not fudge or brownies), calling for “a handful of stoned dates, dried figs, shelled almonds and peanuts,” plus sugar and butter, rolled into balls.

“Toklas either never bothered to read Gysin’s recipe in her haste, or didn’t know what cannabis, which Gysin spelled canibus, was,” Lawrence says. The “fudge” made it into the British edition of the book when it was published in 1954, though editors in New York kept it out of the U.S. edition. The scandalous recipe appears in the second edition released in the 1960s, probably based on the recipe’s popularity overseas.

The recipe morphed into brownie form thanks to “I Love You, Alice B. Toklas,” a 1968 Peter Sellers movie, Lawrence says. In the film’s pivotal scene, Nancy, a beautiful hippie with a butterfly tattoo, dumps her cannabis stash into the bowl of an electric mixer along with milk, eggs and a box of fudge brownie mix. The “groovy brownies” became part of the plot, and the pot brownie was born.

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That may be entertaining on screen, but it’s a terrible way to make a delicious pot brownie, Isaiou says. If you want the latter, she adds, you need to know one word: cannabutter. And you should live in a place where making it is legal.

In brief, cannabutter is butter that’s infused with cannabis that’s been toasted to activate the THC (a process called decarboxylation, or “decarbing” for short). Some cooks simmer butter and water mixed with cannabis on the stove top, while others prefer to sous vide; Isaiou favors a rice cooker for this step. The infused butter is cooled and strained; Isaiou goes an extra step and clarifies hers to a gheelike consistency. A second option is to mix cannabis extract into butter or another fat. (Note: In some states cannabutter is available for purchase, but for those who have time on their hands, it’s not a difficult project.)

Of course, pot brownies don’t have to be complicated, says Jessica Nelson, who runs the Fresh Fork Chef Services in Baltimore, which hosts cannabis dinners for patients with medicinal marijuana clearance.

Nelson favors a spiked variation on celebrity chef Alton Brown’s Cocoa Brownies, to which she adds espresso, a sprinkle of flaky sea salt and, of course, cannabutter. Yet, she also notes that among home bakers of edibles, Ghirardelli’s Double Chocolate Brownie Mix is a favored starting point.

Either way, “you should definitely start with a good recipe,” she says.

She credits medicinal marijuana activist Mary Jane Rathbun for emphasizing that same point: that pot brownies should taste good.

Although Rathbun, or “Brownie Mary,” never revealed her top-secret recipe, she was famed for baking dozens of pot brownies daily in her San Francisco kitchen and gifting them to those suffering from cancer and AIDS. She fought for the legalization of medical marijuana until her death in 1999.

In 1996, she co-authored a cookbook with fellow activist Dennis Peron: “Brownie Mary’s Marijuana Cookbook and Dennis Peron’s Recipe for Social Change.” Conspicuously missing: her brownie recipe.

While the recipe she described as “magically delicious” may be lost to history, critics at least are certain that her version was an actual brownie, not a majoun. In Lawrence’s book, she points to a 1992 incident in Sonoma County, where Rathbun was arrested by the Drug Enforcement Administration and local law officials while making brownies at a friend’s house and charged with felony possession. The officers reported confiscating 20 pounds of high-grade cannabis, along with 50 pounds of flour and sugar, 22 dozen eggs and 35 pounds of margarine.

Any ardent baker will identify with her outrage; Rathbun was insulted that the police suggested she used margarine in her precious brownies. “The narcs may not know any better,” she fumed, as reported in her obituary in The Guardian, “but that was the finest quality butter.”

Newman is contributing spirits editor at Wine Enthusiast and author of several books, including “Cocktails With a Twist.”

NOTE: The Washington Post does not condone illicit drug use, so this recipe should be made only by those who live where it is legal do so. This recipe uses 1/4 cup cannabutter, which should have 263 milligrams THC. This means each 2-inch brownie square has about 11 milligrams THC.

Storage Notes: The brownies taste even better the next day and keep well if tightly wrapped. They can be refrigerated for up to 1 week or frozen, tightly wrapped, for up to 3 months. The cannabutter can be refrigerated for up to 1 month or frozen for up to 1 year.


Ingredients

For the cannabutter:

10 grams cannabis

4 cups (960 milliliters) water

2 1/2 sticks (10 ounces/284 grams) unsalted European-style butter

For the brownies:

1 stick (4 ounces/113 grams) unsalted butter

1/4 cup (57 grams) cannabutter

12 ounces (340 grams) bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped

1 cup (213 grams) packed light brown sugar

3/4 cup (150 grams) granulated sugar

1 teaspoon fine sea salt

4 large eggs

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

3/4 cup (90 grams) all-purpose flour


Steps

Step 1

Make the cannabutter: Position the rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 250 degrees. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Using your hands or kitchen shears, break the cannabis into small pieces or grind it coarsely in a food processor. Place the cannabis on the baking sheet. Place the baking sheet in the oven and toast the cannabis for 30 minutes, until very dry.

Step 2

In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine the cannabis with the water and butter. Bring to a boil, then decrease the heat so the mixture is at a very low simmer and cook for 3 hours, infusing the butter. Check and replenish the water as it evaporates — it is important to keep an 1 inch or so of water on the bottom of the pan as it cooks. Remove from the heat and let cool for about 30 minutes.

Step 3

Strain the mixture through cheesecloth or a fine-mesh sieve placed over a large bowl, pressing on the solids to extract all the butter and liquid from the cannabis (discard the spent cannabis). Refrigerate the liquid for at least 45 minutes, until the butter has solidified. Then, lift the solid layer of butter from the murky water and discard the water. Using paper towels, pat the butter until dry. Use immediately, or cover and refrigerate, or freeze until needed. Label that the container contains cannabis.

Step 4

Make the brownies: Position a baking rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 350 degrees. Lightly butter or spray a 9-by-13-inch baking pan.

Step 5

In a medium heavy-bottomed saucepan over low heat, melt the butter and cannabutter. Add the chocolate and stir until it has just about melted. Add the brown sugar, granulated sugar and salt, and stir until thoroughly combined. Remove from the heat, set aside and let cool slightly. The chocolate should melt from the residual heat.

Step 6

In a large bowl, whisk the eggs until foamy, then whisk in the vanilla.

Step 7

Whisk the warm chocolate mixture into the eggs. (If the chocolate is too hot, it will scramble your eggs; you should be able to touch the chocolate with your fingertip and not be uncomfortable.)

Step 8

Whisk the flour gently into the egg mixture just until combined, and no clumps of flour remain (do not overmix). The batter will be thick.

Step 9

Pour the batter into prepared pan. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until the top just starts to crack and is glossy. Remove from the oven and cool completely on a wire rack before cutting. Be sure to mark that these have cannabis in them.

Adapted from “High Tea: Cannabis Cakes, Tarts and Bakes” by Diana Isaiou (Smith Street Books, September 2020)

Tested by Rebekah Yonan; email questions to voraciously@washpost.com.

Scale and get a printer-friendly version of the recipe here.

Did you make this recipe? Take a photo and tag us on Instagram with #eatvoraciously.

Nutrition

Calories: 218; Total Fat: 13 g; Saturated Fat: 8 g; Cholesterol: 46 mg; Sodium: 110 mg; Carbohydrates: 23 g; Dietary Fiber: 2 g; Sugars: 17 g; Protein: 2 g.

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‘Cooked with Cannabis’ proves molecular gastronomy is not the only way to the future of food – MEAWW

What seemed like the ‘next generation’ in eating, cooking, and creating foods is already here and that future is now as we know it! If you thought that lab-made ingredients and incorporating molecular gastronomy will be the only things dominating the future of foods, then you might want to reconsider your thoughts and catch up on this all-new culinary show titled ‘Cooked with Cannabis’.

Netflix’s latest food reality show is all about using marijuana in cooking. Using its different extracts, strains, oils, and more, professional chefs and cannabis experts create delectable, innovative dishes and take the hosts and judges on a high that could be easily called a combination of good food and a lot of weed. But hold onto your excitement about the potent herb for a minute

This show is essentially about cooking great food and exploring unique ways of using cannabis. It is also about the fun of the entire experience.

Above and beyond that, the show is also about answering the most burning question — What does the future of food look like? This is a topic that foodies, culinary experts, chefs, and enthusiasts have been asking, answering, and debating on, for a while and somehow, ‘Cooked with Cannabis’ gives you the answer, provided you see beyond the plate.

Let us start by fulfilling your curiosity and say “yes” to cannabis being a sought-after ingredient. Hemp has been in usage for a long time but only in the wake of legalization of this plant that we have started to explore various utilities. The same goes for the raw flower and leaf. THC and CBD oils are infused in cooking oils, butter, spreads, marinades, blends, cocktails, while the leaves can be used to smoke meat, soups, and a lot more.

Across the six episodes, professional cannabis chefs along with cannabis-based food expert and host Leather Storrs walk through some of the most flavorful and extraordinary dishes using the herb. And in the process, we learn that this could be where the future of food lies. Using an age-old, ancient herb and rediscovering its utility to not just induce intoxication but to add and enhance flavor and aromas, and elevate the taste of a dish.

In fact, in the episode ‘Futurist Food’, we explored recipes with mealworms, of course a touch of molecular gastronomy, and deconstructing traditional favorites.
But what remains as the key takeaway is that how this promising ingredient can alter the experience of a recipe when used in different forms and different dosages.

The future of food will not only be shrunken portions, lab-grown meat, and resorting to high protein worms as a protein source, but also infusing ingredients that were beyond our imagination.

Today, it might be marijuana, in another decade or so, with more research, we could start to see the culinary usage of other ancient plants which are tabooed today, like opium or coca plants for instance. The future, as ironical as it may seem, is going back to nature, but with a fresh perspective and ‘Cooked with Cannabis’ shows us the very first step.

‘Cooked with Cannabis’ is now streaming all six episodes on Netflix.

If you have an entertainment scoop or a story for us, please reach out to us on (323) 421-7515

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Mother’s Day Gift Guide 2020: The Finest Cannabis Cookware & Accessories – Forbes

Now, more so than ever, is a time to celebrate the joys of domesticity. After all, it’s no coincidence that making a good meal can warm the soul just like cannabis can. The two go hand in hand. 

Cooking can also bring back memories of the person who likely taught you all those recipes: your mom! Do those good smells take you back to kinder times? Do you know of (or happen to be) a badass mom who enjoys cannabis and cooking? Then this cannabis cookware themed Mother’s Day gift guide is for you. Check it out for some epic gift ideas for mom, then start spreading some joy. 

Levo II

The Levo II is arguably one of the nicest things you can get a canna-mom. First off it’s a beautiful machine in and of itself. It’s designed to look a little bit like a modern espresso maker and adds a pinch of color to otherwise stagnant counter space. 

Secondly the thing is, plain and simple, a godsend of an infusion machine. The Levo II is streamlined to handle just about any function you’d need for edibles. That means it can decarboxylate as well as infuse oils. You can also infuse oils with any herb including cannabis, giving creative types endless opportunities to create their own signature creations. It also has a very useful digital screen with temperature settings or can be alternatively controlled via the Levo app.

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And if you happen to give it to a mom who makes and shares their edibles with you…well that’s just swell. 

Nova FX by Ardent Cannabis

Before the Levo II I would make tinctures by hand. This meant decarboxylating flower in the oven then double boiling it in a mason jar over the stove for hours. You can see how this was a laborious process that took up much of my attention. 

When I got my first Nova decarboxylator I was elated to see how much it sped up the process. Now with the release of the Nova FX I find myself dreaming of the new model, the Nova FX. It’s 4 times larger than the original and allows you to decarboxylate, extract, infuse, melt, and bake all in one appliance. You also don’t need any minimum amount of plant material to work with it, meaning you could literally travel with it and create edibles on the go. 

You can even get additional fantastic add ons like a cake sampler kit or a “Magic Shell” sleeve here.

Tcheck 2 Flower and Concentrate Tester

Have you ever made a batch of edibles and found out they were far more potent than expected? Or perhaps you accidentally wound up with a bunk batch of edibles. Regardless of how you got there, cannabis chefs ultimately have no way to test their final products. Until…

I discovered the Tcheck 2 Flower and Concentrate Tester. This fantastic device is a portable spectrometer that allows you to easily test for THC, THCa, or CBD potency in your infusions. Manufacturers state you can measure to determine the strength of your infusion in less than 45 seconds which is, quite frankly, nothing shy of insane. 

You can also get an expansion kit that allows you to test for total overall cannabinoids (defined as “aggregate of all cannabinoids including:  THCa, THC, CBDa, CBD, CBG, CBN.”) 

Baked” Apron by Horny Stoner

Horny Stoner is the most fabulous site devoted to, you guessed it, funny and sexy cannabis gear, accessories and merch. I love this baked apron because it’s simple but classy. It features a humble little cannabis leaf so it isn’t too over the top, has two front pockets and an adjustable neck loop and long ties. The embroidered effect is very visually pleasing (especially after a joint or two), and is likely to become a staple item in the canna-mom kitchen. 

Humboldt’s Finest Hemp Infused Vodka

Edibles can take a long time to make. What’s one to do while waiting? You could always try the time tested method of sipping the time away. Indulge in a little tipple for the chef and their guests with the terpene-rich Humboldt’s Finest Hemp Infused Vodka. In terms of quality this herbacious drink also took home the title of Double Gold Medal Winner in the 2017 San Francisco World Spirits Competition. 

Don’t make edibles? That’s cool, too. Use it to create canna-cocktails, or sip on it just cause it’s a Wednesday. You do you, queen.

Magical Butter 2

If you’re the type of canna-mom who delights in making edibles for a crowd for parties then you’ll probably fall head over heels for the Magical Butter 2. Much like the Levo II this beauty is a one stop shop for edibles lovers, allowing the user to grind, heat, stir and steep your extracts with little effort. It doesn’t decarboxylate (alas), though the immersion blender and self-cleaning features are likely to make up for that. You can also make huge quantities of infused oils with the MB2—up to a whopping 5 cups. Aaaand you can also nab super awesome cannabutter trays from the Magical Butter folks, too.

Cannabis Embossing Rolling Pin

Okay, seriously. As if just loading Etsy these days isn’t dangerous enough. They had to go and up the game by selling this freaking adorable cannabis embossed rolling pin, too?!

No, but really: if you are/know of a canna-mom who loves to bake, this cute rolling pin is sure to cause squeals of delight. Cannabis leaves are laser engraved into the pin, resulting in a cascade of patterning leaves that rolls out onto your dough. The pins are also nice and large themselves, coming in at nearly 16 inches with handles. And finally the whole ensemble is covered with protective wood conditioner made from organic food-grade oil. The set also comes with three of the merchant’s favorite cookie recipes. 

Sweet Mary Jane: 75 Delicious Cannabis-Infused High-End Desserts by Karin Lazarus

You can’t really go around making infused recipes willy-nilly (unless you’re a far, far braver woman than I, in which case…rock on). Nope, you’re likely going to want to have some recipes on hand to guide you through. And we’re lucky enough to live in a time where infused cookbooks are, in fact, a thing.

One great pick for the mom with a sweet tooth would be Karin Lazarus’ Sweet Mary Jane: 75 Delicious Cannabis-Infused High-End Desserts (there’s even a chapter in there just for dosing). Lazarus is the founder of the beloved Colorado based bakery, Sweet Mary Jane. She’s been dubbed “the queen of munchies” and even won the Rooster Cup, a taste test for Colorado’s best pot edibles, back in 2013. Need I say more? 

Not into sweets? You could also opt for Bong Appétit: Mastering the Art of Cooking with Weed [A Cookbook] if you’re seeking a more savory approach.

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Five Cannabis Meal Ideas for Your 4/20 at Home – Phoenix New Times

If you’re spending April 20 at home — and it looks like we all are — you can still treat yourself to something special on this special day. A number of easy recipes have been gifted to home cooks and cannabis users from big names like Bon Appetit and Vice’s Bong Appetit, which call for healthy amounts of weed. And, it’s assumed you already have a favorite weed butter recipe.

You don’t have to be a doctor green thumb or a gourmet to create some of these recommended dishes incorporating cannabis. You just need an open mind … and maybe a working oven.

Breakfast

Weed Glazed Doughnuts

If you want your eyes to glaze over over your homemade glaze, try this recipe from The Cannabis School. These weed glazed doughnuts allow home cooks to infuse both the glaze and the doughnut itself. You need cannabis-infused milk and butter, as well as a stand mixer and doughnut cutter. Make up to 18 doughnuts, and maybe take the rest of the day off.

Lunch

Green Macaroni and Cheese Recipe

Of course, something on this list has to be green. Try this green macaroni and cheese recipe from Vice’s Bong Appétit: Mastering the Art of Cooking With Weed. The green comes from the baby spinach, parsley, basil, and two tablespoons of infused butter. All the vegetables and cheese get mixed with a pound of elbow macaroni, spread in a 13-inch baking dish, and stuck in the oven till golden brown.

Snack

Marijuana Popcorn

No one said you needed to devote your three squares entirely to the 4/20 gods. Maybe you’re simply looking for a treat — which is where we recommend marijuana popcorn. The smell alone is a comfort, like walking into a movie theater or old bar, and the comfort afterward is well … you’ll soon see. MarijuanaBreak is here with an easy recipe. Start with a saucepan over medium-high heat. Throw in your choice of oil, popcorn kernels, salt, a tablespoon of butter, and a tablespoon of weed butter. Move the pan over the burner till mostly popped, then drizzle an additional tablespoon of melted weed butter — and maybe more salt for taste.

Five Cannabis Meal Ideas for Your 4/20 at HomeEXPAND

Raphael Nogueira/Unsplash

Dinner

Cannabis Garlic and Rosemary Pork Chops

Whether hosting a marijuana-themed dinner party or just cooking for one, a hearty yet cannabis-infused meal can be easy to do. You don’t have to be chef Andrea Drummer of Original Cannabis Café, but you probably can make this entree from Eat Your Cannabis. You’ll need four pork chops, herbs and spices like salt, pepper, garlic, some weed butter, and cannaoil — cannabis and olive oil. You essentially season the chops, mix and brush on the rest, and put everything into the over.

Five Cannabis Meal Ideas for Your 4/20 at HomeEXPAND

Yulia Khlebnikova/Unsplash

Dessert

Ice Cream with CBD Caramel Sauce

Got some ice cream, CBD oil, and a few other ingredients lying around? Try making this CBD caramel sauce from Bon Appetit. The recipe calls for sugar, heavy cream, butter, vanilla extract, kosher salt, and full-spectrum CBD oil — which you are to stir into the caramel “until mixture is emulsified.” The caramel is also good for up to two weeks.

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Gooey Pot Brownies – Washington Post

Dark chocolate, a sprinkle of sea salt and cannabis-infused butter (cannabutter) come together for the ultimate take on the iconic edible.

NOTE: The Washington Post does not endorse illicit drug use, so this should be made only if you live where it is legal to do so.

According to cookbook author Diana Isaiou, based on cannabis with 15 percent THC, 1/4 cup of this cannabutter should have 263 milligrams THC total, which means each 2-inch brownie square has about 11 milligrams THC.

Storage Notes: The brownies taste even better the next day, and keep well if tightly wrapped. They can be refrigerated for up to 1 week, or frozen, tightly wrapped, for up to 3 months. The cannabutter can be refrigerated for up to 1 month or frozen for up to 1 year.


Servings:

24

Tested size: 24 servings; makes about 24 two-inch brownies

Ingredients
  • For the brownies
  • 1 stick (4 ounces/113 grams) unsalted butter

  • 1/4 cup (57 grams) cannabutter

  • 12 ounces (340 grams) bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped

  • 1 cup (213 grams) packed light brown sugar

  • 3/4 cup (150 grams) granulated sugar

  • 1 teaspoon fine sea salt

  • 4 large eggs

  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

  • 3/4 cup (90 grams) all-purpose flour


Directions

Make the cannabutter: Position the rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 250 degrees. Line a large, rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Using your hands or kitchen shears, break the cannabis into small pieces or grind it coarsely in a food processor. Place the cannabis on the baking sheet. Place the baking sheet in the oven and toast the cannabis for 30 minutes, until very dry.

In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine the cannabis with the water and butter. Bring to a boil, then decrease the heat so the mixture is at a very low simmer and cook for 3 hours, infusing the butter. Check and replenish the water as it evaporates — it is important to keep an 1 inch or so of water on the bottom of the pan as it cooks. Remove from the heat and let cool for about 30 minutes.

Strain the mixture through cheesecloth or a fine-mesh sieve placed over a large bowl, pressing on the solids to extract all the butter and liquid from the cannabis (discard the spent cannabis). Refrigerate the liquid for at least 45 minutes, until the butter has solidified. Then, lift the solid layer of butter from the murky water and discard the water. Using paper towels, pat the butter until dry. Use immediately, or cover and refrigerate or freeze until needed. Label that the container contains cannabis.

Make the brownies: Position a baking rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 350 degrees. Lightly butter or spray a 9-by-13-inch baking pan.

In a medium heavy-bottomed saucepan over low heat, melt the butter and cannabutter. Add the chocolate and stir until it has just about melted. Add the brown sugar, granulated sugar and salt, and stir until thoroughly combined. Remove from the heat, set aside and let cool slightly. The chocolate should melt from the residual heat.

In a large bowl, whisk the eggs until foamy, then whisk in the vanilla.

Whisk the warm chocolate mixture into the eggs. (If the chocolate is too hot, it will scramble your eggs; you should be able to touch the chocolate with your fingertip and not be uncomfortable.)

Whisk the flour gently into the egg mixture just until combined, and no clumps of flour remain (do not overmix). The batter will be thick.

Pour the batter into prepared pan. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until the top just starts to crack and is glossy. Remove from the oven and cool completely on a wire rack before cutting. Be sure to mark that these have cannabis in them.


Recipe Source

Adapted from “High Tea: Cannabis Cakes, Tarts and Bakes” by Diana Isaiou (Smith Street Books, September 2020)

Tested by Rebekah Yonan.

Email questions to the Food Section.

Email questions to the Food Section at food@washpost.com.