Categories
Uncategorized

Oklahoma restaurant owner experiments with cooking with cannabis – KOCO Oklahoma City

Jarros Friedel has his medical marijuana card and has been experimenting with recipes that go beyond the standard of gummies and brownies.One of the recipes the co-owner of Guyute’s in Oklahoma City has been working on is a chicken confit. He makes the oil at his house.”We grind up the cannabis. We put it in the oven at 220 for about an hour,” Friedel says in a video he sent to KOCO 5. “Once it’s decarbed, you set up a double boiler and heat it to about 140, put cannabis in oil in mason jar in a double boiler. Let it sit there. It becomes infused after about an hour, hour and a half. Strain oil.”And that wasn’t the only cannabis component to the chicken confit.”We made some verblanc sauce to put over the top of it with our infused cannabis butter,” Friedel said, “and the infused cannabis butter actually does have a smell to it.”KOCO 5’s Abigail Ogle: “I guess that just adds to the high, essentially?”Friedel: “Yes, absolutely. This is almost 200 milligrams per tablespoon, so it’s gonna put you out.”Friedel said the high amount of marijuana won’t really affect the taste or the smell of the chicken confit.Restaurant professionals aren’t the only ones getting creative in the cannabis kitchen. Lauri Dykstra started exploring marijuana recipes when she had stage 2 breast cancer.”Anything that you love to make, you can add a little bit of cannabis oil to it,” Dykstra said.People at a reputable dispensary will help customers buy what they need.”You just start out with a really low amount and see what you can tolerate,” Dykstra said.That aspect is key as experts said it can be harder to gauge how much marijuana you’re ingesting when you eat it compared to smoking it.”The critical thing is obviously getting the dosing correct, which is more difficult than it might seem,” Dr. Steven Ross said.How the cannabis is ingested also should be taken into consideration.Ogle: “Would you say that it’s more potent this way? To eat it rather than smoke it?”Friedel: “Absolutely. It’s very much more potent this way.”Ogle: “So what serving of this would be? One piece of chicken?”Friedel: “Yes, one piece of of chicken and some potatoes and asparagus and onions.”Ogle: “Would you be OK to drive after that?”Friedel: “Legally, I don’t believe so. It helps pain a lot. And nausea. And insomnia. Running a restaurant, being here until 4 to 5 in the morning, it really helps to ease your pain, helps you go to bed really easy.” It’s important to note that the restaurant owner KOCO 5 spoke to said they are not selling any dishes with marijuana, just experimenting with recipes in their kitchen.At this point, it would be illegal for a location to cook a cannabis dish and serve it to someone at a restaurant, even if the customer has their medical marijuana card.

Jarros Friedel has his medical marijuana card and has been experimenting with recipes that go beyond the standard of gummies and brownies.

Advertisement

One of the recipes the co-owner of Guyute’s in Oklahoma City has been working on is a chicken confit. He makes the oil at his house.

“We grind up the cannabis. We put it in the oven at 220 for about an hour,” Friedel says in a video he sent to KOCO 5. “Once it’s decarbed, you set up a double boiler and heat it to about 140, put cannabis in oil in mason jar in a double boiler. Let it sit there. It becomes infused after about an hour, hour and a half. Strain oil.”

And that wasn’t the only cannabis component to the chicken confit.

“We made some verblanc sauce to put over the top of it with our infused cannabis butter,” Friedel said, “and the infused cannabis butter actually does have a smell to it.”

KOCO 5’s Abigail Ogle: “I guess that just adds to the high, essentially?”

Friedel: “Yes, absolutely. This is almost 200 milligrams per tablespoon, so it’s gonna put you out.”

Friedel said the high amount of marijuana won’t really affect the taste or the smell of the chicken confit.

Restaurant professionals aren’t the only ones getting creative in the cannabis kitchen. Lauri Dykstra started exploring marijuana recipes when she had stage 2 breast cancer.

“Anything that you love to make, you can add a little bit of cannabis oil to it,” Dykstra said.

People at a reputable dispensary will help customers buy what they need.

“You just start out with a really low amount and see what you can tolerate,” Dykstra said.

That aspect is key as experts said it can be harder to gauge how much marijuana you’re ingesting when you eat it compared to smoking it.

“The critical thing is obviously getting the dosing correct, which is more difficult than it might seem,” Dr. Steven Ross said.

How the cannabis is ingested also should be taken into consideration.

Ogle: “Would you say that it’s more potent this way? To eat it rather than smoke it?”

Friedel: “Absolutely. It’s very much more potent this way.”

Ogle: “So what serving of this would be? One piece of chicken?”

Friedel: “Yes, one piece of of chicken and some potatoes and asparagus and onions.”

Ogle: “Would you be OK to drive after that?”

Friedel: “Legally, I don’t believe so. It helps pain a lot. And nausea. And insomnia. Running a restaurant, being here until 4 to 5 in the morning, it really helps to ease your pain, helps you go to bed really easy.”

It’s important to note that the restaurant owner KOCO 5 spoke to said they are not selling any dishes with marijuana, just experimenting with recipes in their kitchen.

At this point, it would be illegal for a location to cook a cannabis dish and serve it to someone at a restaurant, even if the customer has their medical marijuana card.

Categories
Uncategorized

4 Cannabis Peanut Butter Recipes (That Will Make You Even More Popular with Friends) – Greencamp

Who can ever turn down one big spoon of peanut butter? We can’t, that’s for sure – especially if we add a little bit of cannabis inside.

That’s why we prepared four different recipes for you. We want you to try them out and then enjoy all the compliments you will receive once you serve them to your friends.

But before we start, there are two things to keep in mind. First, it’s very important to calculate the proper dosage of cannabis in your butter. Rule of thumb: never put a lot at the beginning. Start low and add more later.

While cannabis dosage differs from person to person, we have guidelines on weed measurements you can use to test out and follow as you measure out your weed and cook your peanut butter to your preferred potency. It can also simply help you define what measurement units mean in actual amounts of weed.

Second, an essential part of the process to cover is cannabis decarboxylation. In each of these recipes, you’ll have to use cannabis that is decarboxylated. This process activates the cannabinoids found in cannabis, making them easy for the body to absorb.

The Process of Decarboxylation

Don’t worry, the decarboxylation process may sound like a hard thing to do, but in reality, it’s a piece of cake.

Utensils you will need:

  • Baking Tray
  • Baking Sheet
  • Tinfoil

Start with preheating your oven (approximately 100ºC). Use a baking tray and add a baking sheet on it. After that, place your cannabis on the sheet and tent it with tinfoil. You want to spread the cannabis out as much as you can, but don’t try to cram in too much on the tray.

Place it in the oven and wait for 50 minutes. The length of time is a guideline only. It really depends on the oven. When your cannabis becomes dry and brown with a crumbly consistency, you know it’s done.

Now that you have decarboxylated your cannabis and have it all ready and prepared for your peanut butter, let’s jump straight into the recipes.

Quick and Easy Peanut Butter

Let’s warm you up with the easiest recipe. You won’t be making your own peanut butter from scratch for this one.  Instead, you’ll be using store-bought peanut butter.

Preparation time: 15 minutes

Serving: 1 Person

Level: Beginner

Take one small bowl and add two tablespoons of peanut butter. Add inside one tablespoon of olive oil and mix it until you get a smooth texture. After that, add in your cannabis and mix it well. When you’re done, put it in the freezer for a couple of hours.

Keep in mind that this peanut butter will have crumbles. If you are not a big fan of that crumbly texture, you can easily make cannabis-infused olive oil and use it in the recipe to get a smooth butter-like texture. There are a lot of variations you can try and get it closer to your preferences.

Homemade Cannabis Peanut Butter

This recipe requires a little bit more effort since we’re going to make our own peanut butter instead of using peanut butter from the store.

Preparation time: 25 minutes

Serving: More than 5

Level: Beginner

Since we’ll be making peanut butter from scratch ourselves, let’s take a look at the list of ingredients. This way you’ll know what to prepare.

  • 5 Cups of peanuts (unsalted)
  • 1 Teaspoon of salt
  • 2 Tablespoons of honey
  • ¼  Cup of peanut oil
  • Cannabis

Put the peanuts, salt, and honey in a blender and grind everything for a couple of minutes. When there are no crumbles, add the peanut oil and blend it for another two minutes.

Add your cannabis and keep blending until you achieve the desired texture. If you prefer your peanut butter a little crumbly, don’t blend it too much, and if you like smooth peanut butter, blend it for a couple more minutes.

Put everything in a bowl with a cover and place it in the freezer. Each time you want to serve your peanut butter, give it a little stir with a spoon.

Haitian Cannabis Peanut Butter

If you’re tired of regular peanut butter and you want to spice things up a little bit, this is the recipe for you.

Preparation time: 20 minutes

Servings: 4

Level: Beginner

What ingredients will you need?

  • 2 Cups unsalted raw peanuts
  • 2 Tablespoons peanut oil
  • 1 Teaspoon of red pepper
  • 2 Tablespoons of brown sugar or honey
  • 1/4 Teaspoon of salt

When you look at all the above ingredients, it doesn’t seem like the stuff you would expect in peanut butter, right? Well, all those ingredients combined make heaven in a jar!

If you want to make original Haitian peanut butter, you need to roast the raw peanuts for a couple of minutes.

Put the peanut oil into a pan and add the two cups of raw peanuts. After two or three minutes of stirring, transfer the mixture into a blender. Use the spatula to scoop the leftover oil from the pan and add that into the blender, as well.

Add in the other ingredients – the red pepper, salt, and brown sugar or honey. If you want to follow the original recipe, add sugar, but if you prefer honey, then use that, instead. The taste will remain the same. Blend everything for a minute or two and add your cannabis. Keep blending until you get a creamy texture.

When you’re done, put everything into a jar and leave it in the freezer.

Enjoy!

Thai Cannabis Peanut Butter

Lastly, we’ll leave you with another different, yet tasty recipe. The process of making this Thai-inspired peanut butter is similar to all the other recipes we’ve covered. The only difference is the spices.

You’ll need things like soy sauce and red curry, but once you’re done you’ll have a rhapsody for your palate.

Preparation time: 20 minutes

Servings: 3

Level: Beginner

There are nine things you’ll need to make this Thai cannabis peanut butter.

  • 1 1/2 Cups of coconut milk
  • 1 Cup creamy peanut butter
  • 1/4 cup Thai red curry paste
  • 2 Tablespoons of apple cider vinegar
  • 2 Tablespoons of soy sauce
  • 2 Tablespoons of brown sugar or honey
  • 1 Tablespoon of fresh lime juice
  • 2 Tablespoons of peanuts
  • Cannabis

Start by adding everything but the cannabis and the peanuts into the blender. Again, you can choose whether you want to add brown sugar or honey, just don’t add both. Mix them until you get a creamy texture and then add in your cannabis and peanuts. Blend for one minute (or less) and you’re done.

This peanut butter should ideally be crumbly, but if you don’t like that use cannabis olive oil instead, and don’t add in any of the peanuts. Again, it’s all about your preferences. Place it in the freezer and wait a little bit before serving.

Cannabis-Infused Olive Oil

As you’ve already noticed, we mentioned a couple of times that you can use cannabis-infused olive oil. Cannabis olive oil is easy to make, and you only need a few things and a little bit of time.

If you aren’t a fan of crumbly peanut butter, and you wish to use infused oil instead, you can make it by combining olive oil and decarboxylated cannabis and cooking it for a couple of hours. You don’t have to stir constantly, so it doesn’t require a lot of effort.

When you’re done, wait until it cools down and then strain it. That’s it – your cannabis olive oil is ready to be used in other great peanut butter recipes.

Why should you make cannabis peanut butter? Well, first of all, it’s a great treat and you can enjoy it anytime you crave something sweet. But not only that, it’s also a great base for a lot of different things. If you have a jar of it in a freezer, you can easily make cookies, crunch bars, smoothies and more, all without any effort.

Categories
Uncategorized

The One Mistake Most New Cannabis Cooks Make – The Fresh Toast

So you’re new to cannabis — welcome! You’ve likely already started enjoying and experimenting (always in moderation). The edibles at your local shop look so yummy, don’t they? But $15 for a brownie?! You’ve been baking your entire life. How tough can it be to make your own?

The answer: It’s not. But it’s likely not the same kind of baking you’re used to. To cook with marijuana properly (meaning effectively, as in, the marijuana doesn’t take over the flavor of the dish completely and it’s the correct dosage), you need to take the step even the most enthusiast “baker” down the street is probably forgetting — decarboxylation.

Please. Come back. Sit down. This isn’t going to be a lecture on organic chemistry. I mean, if you want that, go here. But decarboxylation is something you haven’t likely done before, right? It’s still a novel idea in modern American cooking when home chefs prepare their own ingredients.

What It Does

(Briefly) chemically speaking, decarboxylation removes carbon atoms from a carbon chain. For our purposes, it will convert THCA to THC. THC, one of the two most discussed compounds in cannabis, is the main cause of the euphoria associated with it. It already exists in raw marijuana you buy since as it dries it converts THCA to THC. Decarboxylation jump-starts the process.

RELATED: This Is What You Need To Do To Marijuana Before You Can Make Edibles

How Marijuana's THCV Can Positively Impact Your Life
Photo by Bacsica/Getty Images

How to Do It

You will need ground marijuana (finer is better), a baking sheet/pan and, if you have it, baking parchment. Preheat the oven to 225 degrees Fahrenheit. Cover the pan with a sheet of the parchment. Evenly lay the herb out on the paper. Bake at 225 for 45 minutes.

RELATED: I Used A Decarboxylator To Make Weed Beer And It Was Amazing

As with barbecue, there are hundreds of Vital Secret Rules on how to improve. Two things to consider when modifying this recipe: Higher heat may burn the marijuana and make it less effective and taste worse. Low and slow may be the way to go, but it will release more odor and 75 minutes at 200 degrees might be too much of a time commitment — though that gets great results.

Other advice: Ventilate the area properly and use a timer. Especially if you’ve already been indulging.

What Now?

Your cannabis is now ready to be added to butter or made into tinctures or flavored oils. My personal favorite is cannabis-infused oil brushed on grilled salmon toward the end of cooking. When using cannabis butter in recipes use the same amount of butter as called for in the recipe.

Butter and oils are better than dumping marijuana into the batter. THC is oil (and alcohol) soluble. So when you infuse, you get more of the effect, less of the strong plant flavor.

butter
Photo by ponce_photography via Pixabay

A Word About Dosage

The main issue regarding cooking with cannabis is that it is illegal under federal law so there is no standard “dose.” And most states where it is legal label THC content, but that substance has varying effects on people. Unlike alcohol where most adults know what one drink will do to them. Or two. Tell the salesperson at the shop you will be baking and note the strain its THC percentage you will be using in your recipe. When cooking, start with a little. Use Jeff the 420 Chef’s calculator to gauge how much THC you will be adding to servings. Write this down. After eating make some notes and some suggestions less/more for next time.

RELATED: 5 Ways To Figure Out THC Dosage With Cannabutter

Keep in mind smoking marijuana can have an effect in five minutes and is gone in two hours or less. The body processes edible cannabis differently and it can take an hour or more to have an effect, which can last up to four hours. The potential danger is a newbie can eat, not feel anything in 30 minutes, then eat more. Then become Maureen Dowd. Start low and go slow until you know what works for you.

Categories
Uncategorized

New Laws Clear the Way for High-end Cannabis Dining in Metro… – Hour Detroit Magazine

.fb-comments,.fb-comments span,.fb-comments span iframe[style]{min-width:100%!important;width:100%!important}

dining cannabis
Cannabis dining comes to metro Detroit

Just over a year ago, Michigan joined the 11 U.S. states that have legalized recreational marijuana. As lawmakers put the finishing touches on state licensing and regulations, various culinarians are fine-tuning recipes that will allow them to contribute to the projected multibillion-dollar industry through food. 

Using microdosing, a method that incorporates low doses of the psychotropic drug into meals, chefs are masterfully adding cannabis-infused oils and spices into sweet and savory dishes alike to offer guests a slight buzz. Across the country, cannabis is baked into pizza crust and sprinkled into breakfast staples like lox and bagels. And locally, chefs are entering the cannabis arena with unique catering businesses. 

Serving as educational experiences, immersive dinners that incorporate cannabis in each course help to demystify cannabis cuisine. Chefs, including Michigan native Enid Parham, use their tablescapes to introduce clients to the plant, which was not long ago deemed taboo. “I always perceived cannabis to be a bad thing because I grew up in the Nancy Reagan era of DARE,” says Parham, also known as Chef Sunflower. Parham has ventured into the cannabis world with LuckyPistil Catering. “Being a dialysis patient, my dad smoked cannabis to cope with his pain. I remember flushing an ounce down the toilet thinking I was helping him quit drugs — boy, how wrong I was.” Today, Parham says her hope is that clients will leave her dining events (which feature dishes like squid ink pasta with infused sun-dried tomato mushroom sherry sauce) “inspired to explore the world of cannabis with an open mind.”    

Recent marijuana laws make it easier for chefs to have honest conversations about the ingredient with guests in these intimate settings. Chi Walker and Jenna Michlin, co-founders and head chefs at Femmes de la Fleur, go so far as to say legalization has lifted the taboo associated with marijuana. “A few years ago, it wasn’t commonplace to talk about marijuana usage so openly. Now, it’s everywhere,” Michlin says. “I think the overall acceptance has expedited the demand in the market.” Walker adds, “With legalization, we’ve been able to destigmatize usage and create spaces for people to be open about their personal and experimental usage.” 

Increased public awareness has likely contributed to the broad range of locals lining up for cannabis dining experiences like Femmes de la Fleur’s — that and highly intriguing menu items, such as locally foraged roasted chanterelle mushroom soup and Rock and Rye Short Ribs served with polenta. “Our clientele is a true hodgepodge of folks,” Walker says. “It’s your everyday white-collar suburbanite attorney, your grandparents, the young cute couple on the block, those seeking more holistic approaches to pain management. People of all walks of life.”

Gigi Diaz, executive chef of Detroit-based catering company Cannabis Concepts, is mindful of cooking for this diverse clientele, including those with dietary restrictions. “I do vegan and vegetarian food as well,” she says touting her pan-fried cauliflower steak encrusted in infused potato flakes and drenched in a mushroom cream gravy. “It’s a really delicious meal.” For Diaz, the 2017 winner of the internationally acclaimed High Times cannabis chef competition, cooking with cannabis is scientific. Those potato flakes, for example — Diaz takes russet potatoes, dices them, soaks them in a housemade cannabis tincture, dehydrates them, and then pulverizes them to make tiny potato flakes. “There’s an artisan concept to it, and that’s what we pride ourselves on.”

Categories
Uncategorized

What can’t you infuse in Washington? – The Spokesman-Review

While infused edibles aren’t a huge part of the state’s legal recreational cannabis market – they make up about 9 percent of marijuana sold – it sometimes seems like you can buy almost anything infused with pot. From champagne to potato chips, sweet treats to coffee, soft drinks to ramen, there’s a huge variety of sweet, savory, smooth or crunchy treats infused with flower available. But there are a few edibles you can’t purchase in Washington, and a few reasons why. Brian Smith, communications director, and Kathi Hoffman, cannabis laws and rules coordinator, for the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board, recently provided guidelines for what is OK to sell and what is not. “The following criteria will be used when determining approval of marijuana infused edibles,” they wrote in an email. A marijuana processor may infuse food or drinks with marijuana provided that: (a) The product or products do not require cooking or baking by the consumer; (b) Coatings (frostings, sprinkles, etc.) applied to the product or products are compliant with the requirements of WAC chapter 314-55; and (c) The product and package design is not similar to commercially available products marketed for consumption by persons under twenty-one years of age, as defined by WAC 314.55.105 (1)(c). For the last item above, the referenced WAC specifically lists gummy candies, lollipops, cotton candy, or brightly colored products as prohibited. It goes on to include fruit or vegetable juices (not including shelf-stable concentrates); fruit or vegetable butters; pumpkin or custard pies, or any pies that contain egg; dairy products of any kind such as butter, cheese, ice cream, or milk; and dried or cured meats as also being prohibited for sale. Marijuana-infused vinegars or oils for cooking also have restrictions. They aren’t allowed to be infused with any other product, like herbs or garlic, so you will have to add those separately to whatever you are cooking. “Infused vinegars or oils can pose food safety risks,” wrote Smith. “The primary concern is the extremely dangerous and sometimes deadly microorganism, Clostridium botulinum (C. bot), which can cause botulism.” There are also guidelines regarding edible packaging. Any product in a package that may be “too appealing” to children won’t be allowed on store shelves. Calls to poison centers about kids accidently ingesting edibles have increased in states where recreational marijuana is legal. Smith says multiple factors may have contributed to that growth in calls. “The presence of the Poison Center “Not for Kids” logo on edible products with the phone number was designed to generate phone calls,” he said. “Also, because it’s now legal for adult use, more people likely feel comfortable reporting it.” In 2018, the WSLCB announced banning the sale of many hard candies, chewy candies, tarts and chocolates, later modifying the restrictions. Edibles can’t be sprayed with colors, molded into shapes other than balls or bars, or have frosting or sprinkles. For those who don’t want to get high, but are seeking the potential benefits of CBD (cannabidiol), take note that CBD edibles can only be sold at cannabis retailers. CBD derived from hemp – which does not have the psychoactive effects of THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) found in marijuana – is often used in lotions and supplements for relaxation and pain relief, and is sold just about everywhere. But the state Department of Agriculture does not allow CBD as an ingredient in traditional foods, and recently cracked down on sales at non-cannabis retailers. “Advertising and claims about CBD and its potential benefits are everywhere these days,” wrote Smith. “The truth is that very little still is known about CBD. It may have been a misconception of the public that CBD was allowed in food products. Cannabinoid extracts like CBD are not allowed as a food ingredient under federal and state law. Marijuana processors licensed by the state can produce CBD-infused edibles for sale in state licensed marijuana retail stores only.”

Tracy Damon is a Spokane-based freelancer who has been writing professionally for 20 years. She has been covering i502 issues since recreational cannabis became legal in Washington.