Categories
Uncategorized

The Best Cannabis Cookbooks – Forbes – Forbes – Forbes

This story was written in collaboration with Forbes Finds. Forbes Finds covers products and experiences we think you’ll love. Featured products are independently selected and linked to for your convenience. If you buy something using a link on this page, Forbes may receive a small share of that sale.

With the legalization of adult-use marijuana sweeping the country, a cannabis culinary movement has come along with it. The plant is more accessible than ever before for the cannacurious to experiment with at home and thanks to the emergence of expert enthusiast cannachefs, pot is appearing on plates everywhere from the James Beard House to private pop-ups catered by a Top Chef contestant

Edibles are the most versatile, discreet and delicious method of consumption, but long before infused food was accepted by the upper echelon of the culinary industry, cannabis cookbooks served as the sole source of inspiration for making meals with marijuana. 

One of the first known cannabis-themed cookbooks was published in 1967, with few titles to follow suit until 2012 when the editors of High Times magazine released one of its own. Today, there is no shortage of resources for high-minded chefs of every skill level and interest.

From a collection of Marley family recipes to a spinoff of the Viceland television series, “Bong Appétit,” here are the seven best cookbooks for ganja-friendly gourmands.

MORE FOR YOU

For the baking buff:

Edibles by Stephanie Hua

Written by the women behind popular gourmet edibles line, Mellows, and the event curation company, Cannaisseur Series, this collection of bite-sized, low-dose recipes will take bakers at any level to new heights. From Spiced Superfood Truffles to Strawberry Jam Pavlovas, 30 unique recipes come complete with instructions for creating master base ingredients like cannabutters, oils, honey and maple syrup, as well as details on dosage and the science of cannabis. 

Read Now

For fine dining:

Cannabis Cuisine by Andrea Drummer

A graduate of Le Cordon Bleu, contestant on Netflix’s “Cooking on High,” and co-owner of Elevation VIP Co-op, a company that caters private, cannabis dinner parties in Los Angeles, chef Andrea Drummer prefers the title of “world class marijuana chef.” Her debut cookbook examines the art of cannabis as an ingredient and shares the belief that, like a fine wine, it is intended to be paired according to its unique flavor profile. From the comforts of southern kitchens to the upscale stoves of Michelin star restaurants, recipes are crafted to elevate the plant to fine dining status. 

Read Now

For the true connoisseur:

Bong Appétit by the Editors of Munchies

An eponymous spinoff of the James Beard Award-nominated Viceland television series, Bong Appétit arms marijuana lovers with the skills necessary to make next-level munchies for every meal. This bible for budding cannabis chefs breaks down the science of infusing and features 65 elevated recipes ranging from weed-infused basted chicken to chimichurri to brownie sundaes. Tidbits on politics, dosage and strain pairings plus expert tips from the show’s stars are peppered throughout the text, too. 

Read Now

A guide for beginners and experts alike:

The Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook by Robin Griggs Lawrence

A crop of the best, and earliest—The Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook was published in 2015— cannabis chefs in the country come together in this roundup of classic recipes from natural living expert and author Robyn Griggs Lawrence. Covering every meal from brunch to late-night cocktails and snacks in 100 tested recipes, the plant is approached as just another fine ingredient meant to be studied and savored. Step-by-step instructions on making oils and butters, dosing recommendations and a strain profile guide are also included.

Read Now

For the veg head:

The Vegan Stoner Cookbook by Sarah Conrique and Graham I. Haynes

Born out of Sarah Conrique and Graham I. Haynes’ popular blog, The Vegan Stoner, this highly illustrated (they’re also a graphic design team) cookbook is an irreverent take on veganism and covers a collection of meatless yet filling meals. While none of the 100 recipes actually contain cannabis, they all require few ingredients, minimal time and effort, and according to this duo are “so simple, even a stoner could prepare them.”

Read Now

For island vibes:

Cooking with Herb by Cedella Marley

Take your tastebuds on a trip to Jamaica from your own kitchen in this collection of 75 family recipes helmed by Cedella Marley. Providing a personal peek into growing up with a legendary musician as a dad, she shares the foundation for a green, clean and healthy lifestyle that Bob Marley instilled in this brood. Along with the basics for making your own infused oils, the book is brimming with Caribbean flavors along with tips for incorporating the herb into an overall wellness routine. 

Read Now

For celebrity-approved creations:

The 420 Gourmet by Jeff The 420 Chef

As the go-to guru among Los Angeles celebrity circles for his festive, private feasts, Jeff the 420 Chef is known for inventing the process which neutralizes the herbaceous taste and smell of cannabis in edibles. The result? Decadent, potent dishes without the weed-like flavor. In The 420 Gourmet, he combines his fun-loving approach to cooking with specific guidelines for safe dosing with a comprehensive calculator, strain summaries, and recipes for brunch, small plates, salads and dinners with gluten-free, vegetarian, vegan and kosher options.

Read Now

Categories
Uncategorized

The Best Cannabis Cookbooks – Forbes – Forbes

This story was written in collaboration with Forbes Finds. Forbes Finds covers products and experiences we think you’ll love. Featured products are independently selected and linked to for your convenience. If you buy something using a link on this page, Forbes may receive a small share of that sale.

With the legalization of adult-use marijuana sweeping the country, a cannabis culinary movement has come along with it. The plant is more accessible than ever before for the cannacurious to experiment with at home and thanks to the emergence of expert enthusiast cannachefs, pot is appearing on plates everywhere from the James Beard House to private pop-ups catered by a Top Chef contestant

Edibles are the most versatile, discreet and delicious method of consumption, but long before infused food was accepted by the upper echelon of the culinary industry, cannabis cookbooks served as the sole source of inspiration for making meals with marijuana. 

One of the first known cannabis-themed cookbooks was published in 1967, with few titles to follow suit until 2012 when the editors of High Times magazine released one of its own. Today, there is no shortage of resources for high-minded chefs of every skill level and interest.

From a collection of Marley family recipes to a spinoff of the Viceland television series, “Bong Appétit,” here are the seven best cookbooks for ganja-friendly gourmands.

MORE FOR YOU

For the baking buff:

Edibles by Stephanie Hua

Written by the women behind popular gourmet edibles line, Mellows, and the event curation company, Cannaisseur Series, this collection of bite-sized, low-dose recipes will take bakers at any level to new heights. From Spiced Superfood Truffles to Strawberry Jam Pavlovas, 30 unique recipes come complete with instructions for creating master base ingredients like cannabutters, oils, honey and maple syrup, as well as details on dosage and the science of cannabis. 

Read Now

For fine dining:

Cannabis Cuisine by Andrea Drummer

A graduate of Le Cordon Bleu, contestant on Netflix’s “Cooking on High,” and co-owner of Elevation VIP Co-op, a company that caters private, cannabis dinner parties in Los Angeles, chef Andrea Drummer prefers the title of “world class marijuana chef.” Her debut cookbook examines the art of cannabis as an ingredient and shares the belief that, like a fine wine, it is intended to be paired according to its unique flavor profile. From the comforts of southern kitchens to the upscale stoves of Michelin star restaurants, recipes are crafted to elevate the plant to fine dining status. 

Read Now

For the true connoisseur:

Bong Appétit by the Editors of Munchies

An eponymous spinoff of the James Beard Award-nominated Viceland television series, Bong Appétit arms marijuana lovers with the skills necessary to make next-level munchies for every meal. This bible for budding cannabis chefs breaks down the science of infusing and features 65 elevated recipes ranging from weed-infused basted chicken to chimichurri to brownie sundaes. Tidbits on politics, dosage and strain pairings plus expert tips from the show’s stars are peppered throughout the text, too. 

Read Now

A guide for beginners and experts alike:

The Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook by Robin Griggs Lawrence

A crop of the best, and earliest—The Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook was published in 2015— cannabis chefs in the country come together in this roundup of classic recipes from natural living expert and author Robyn Griggs Lawrence. Covering every meal from brunch to late-night cocktails and snacks in 100 tested recipes, the plant is approached as just another fine ingredient meant to be studied and savored. Step-by-step instructions on making oils and butters, dosing recommendations and a strain profile guide are also included.

Read Now

For the veg head:

The Vegan Stoner Cookbook by Sarah Conrique and Graham I. Haynes

Born out of Sarah Conrique and Graham I. Haynes’ popular blog, The Vegan Stoner, this highly illustrated (they’re also a graphic design team) cookbook is an irreverent take on veganism and covers a collection of meatless yet filling meals. While none of the 100 recipes actually contain cannabis, they all require few ingredients, minimal time and effort, and according to this duo are “so simple, even a stoner could prepare them.”

Read Now

For island vibes:

Cooking with Herb by Cedella Marley

Take your tastebuds on a trip to Jamaica from your own kitchen in this collection of 75 family recipes helmed by Cedella Marley. Providing a personal peek into growing up with a legendary musician as a dad, she shares the foundation for a green, clean and healthy lifestyle that Bob Marley instilled in this brood. Along with the basics for making your own infused oils, the book is brimming with Caribbean flavors along with tips for incorporating the herb into an overall wellness routine. 

Read Now

For celebrity-approved creations:

The 420 Gourmet by Jeff The 420 Chef

As the go-to guru among Los Angeles celebrity circles for his festive, private feasts, Jeff the 420 Chef is known for inventing the process which neutralizes the herbaceous taste and smell of cannabis in edibles. The result? Decadent, potent dishes without the weed-like flavor. In The 420 Gourmet, he combines his fun-loving approach to cooking with specific guidelines for safe dosing with a comprehensive calculator, strain summaries, and recipes for brunch, small plates, salads and dinners with gluten-free, vegetarian, vegan and kosher options.

Read Now

Categories
Uncategorized

The Best Cannabis Cookbooks – Forbes

This story was written in collaboration with Forbes Finds. Forbes Finds covers products and experiences we think you’ll love. Featured products are independently selected and linked to for your convenience. If you buy something using a link on this page, Forbes may receive a small share of that sale.

With the legalization of adult-use marijuana sweeping the country, a cannabis culinary movement has come along with it. The plant is more accessible than ever before for the cannacurious to experiment with at home and thanks to the emergence of expert enthusiast cannachefs, pot is appearing on plates everywhere from the James Beard House to private pop-ups catered by a Top Chef contestant

Edibles are the most versatile, discreet and delicious method of consumption, but long before infused food was accepted by the upper echelon of the culinary industry, cannabis cookbooks served as the sole source of inspiration for making meals with marijuana. 

One of the first known cannabis-themed cookbooks was published in 1967, with few titles to follow suit until 2012 when the editors of High Times magazine released one of its own. Today, there is no shortage of resources for high-minded chefs of every skill level and interest.

From a collection of Marley family recipes to a spinoff of the Viceland television series, “Bong Appétit,” here are the seven best cookbooks for ganja-friendly gourmands.

For the baking buff:

Edibles by Stephanie Hua

Written by the women behind popular gourmet edibles line, Mellows, and the event curation company, Cannaisseur Series, this collection of bite-sized, low-dose recipes will take bakers at any level to new heights. From Spiced Superfood Truffles to Strawberry Jam Pavlovas, 30 unique recipes come complete with instructions for creating master base ingredients like cannabutters, oils, honey and maple syrup, as well as details on dosage and the science of cannabis. 

Read Now

For fine dining:

Cannabis Cuisine by Andrea Drummer

A graduate of Le Cordon Bleu, contestant on Netflix’s “Cooking on High,” and co-owner of Elevation VIP Co-op, a company that caters private, cannabis dinner parties in Los Angeles, chef Andrea Drummer prefers the title of “world class marijuana chef.” Her debut cookbook examines the art of cannabis as an ingredient and shares the belief that, like a fine wine, it is intended to be paired according to its unique flavor profile. From the comforts of southern kitchens to the upscale stoves of Michelin star restaurants, recipes are crafted to elevate the plant to fine dining status. 

Read Now

For the true connoisseur:

Bong Appétit by the Editors of Munchies

An eponymous spinoff of the James Beard Award-nominated Viceland television series, Bong Appétit arms marijuana lovers with the skills necessary to make next-level munchies for every meal. This bible for budding cannabis chefs breaks down the science of infusing and features 65 elevated recipes ranging from weed-infused basted chicken to chimichurri to brownie sundaes. Tidbits on politics, dosage and strain pairings plus expert tips from the show’s stars are peppered throughout the text, too. 

Read Now

A guide for beginners and experts alike:

The Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook by Robin Griggs Lawrence

A crop of the best, and earliest—The Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook was published in 2015— cannabis chefs in the country come together in this roundup of classic recipes from natural living expert and author Robyn Griggs Lawrence. Covering every meal from brunch to late-night cocktails and snacks in 100 tested recipes, the plant is approached as just another fine ingredient meant to be studied and savored. Step-by-step instructions on making oils and butters, dosing recommendations and a strain profile guide are also included.

Read Now

For the veg head:

The Vegan Stoner Cookbook by Sarah Conrique and Graham I. Haynes

Born out of Sarah Conrique and Graham I. Haynes’ popular blog, The Vegan Stoner, this highly illustrated (they’re also a graphic design team) cookbook is an irreverent take on veganism and covers a collection of meatless yet filling meals. While none of the 100 recipes actually contain cannabis, they all require few ingredients, minimal time and effort, and according to this duo are “so simple, even a stoner could prepare them.”

Read Now

For island vibes:

Cooking with Herb by Cedella Marley

Take your tastebuds on a trip to Jamaica from your own kitchen in this collection of 75 family recipes helmed by Cedella Marley. Providing a personal peek into growing up with a legendary musician as a dad, she shares the foundation for a green, clean and healthy lifestyle that Bob Marley instilled in this brood. Along with the basics for making your own infused oils, the book is brimming with Caribbean flavors along with tips for incorporating the herb into an overall wellness routine. 

Read Now

For celebrity-approved creations:

The 420 Gourmet by Jeff The 420 Chef

As the go-to guru among Los Angeles celebrity circles for his festive, private feasts, Jeff the 420 Chef is known for inventing the process which neutralizes the herbaceous taste and smell of cannabis in edibles. The result? Decadent, potent dishes without the weed-like flavor. In The 420 Gourmet, he combines his fun-loving approach to cooking with specific guidelines for safe dosing with a comprehensive calculator, strain summaries, and recipes for brunch, small plates, salads and dinners with gluten-free, vegetarian, vegan and kosher options.

Read Now

Categories
Uncategorized

Higher learning: Stratfords Chefs School offers cooking with marijuana course – CBC.ca

You’ve likely heard about pot brownies or cannabis candies, but a cooking with marijuana course at the Stratford Chefs School will have students whipping up some finer dining options like chimichurri for steak or a hollandaise sauce for eggs.

Eli Silverthorne is the instructor for the popular class that’s open to the public.

“We’re introducing people into items or techniques or methods that they might not be familiar with. So spiralizers and mandolins, instant pots, cast iron cooking. And we felt that as this legislation came through and it’s a new food topic that this would be a great way to slide into there and show people how to use something that might be new to them,” said Silverthorne.

This is a large hunk of butter infused with marijuana, which is what gives it a slightly greenish hue. The butter can be used in nearly any dish in place of regular butter. And yes, the butter smells very much like pot. (Kate Bueckert/CBC)

‘Last thing you want to do is double up’

As part of the class, 16 people sit down at a long dining room table and learn about different aspects of marijuana that you need to know before cooking with it.

That includes how to dose food properly — Silverthorne says that’s their most popular question.

“It stays in your body, it takes longer to kick in and it actually makes you feel inebriated a lot longer,” he said.

“It is also understanding that if we are eating it to be patient. If you are eating it wait a bit and then have some more because it’s not like smoking it’s not going to be instantaneous.”

He added, “The last thing you want to do is double up waiting for it to kick in and then you’re too far down the road.”

People who take a public cooking class at the Stratford Chefs School start by sitting together at a long dining room table and talking about the cuisine they’re going to learn to cook. After a quick lesson, they head into the kitchen. (Kate Bueckert/CBC)

Infused oils and fats

Then the students are taught how to make infused oils and butter, which can then be substituted for fats in other recipes, including a sunflower-seed pesto, a vinaigrette and even brownies.

“The majority of the course is when we’re going to be talking about the edibles,” Silverthorne said. “We’ll talk about the science and the different methods to do that and then we’ll get right into the recipes and show people how to get cooking.”

Silverthorne notes while there’s a hands-on element and people do get to cook in the class, it’s important to know they won’t be cooking with marijuana during the course. Instead, those who take the course can take the recipes home to make dishes for themselves.

People who take the course at the Stratford Chefs School are given background information on legislation surrounding edibles in Canada, a way to calculate dosage as well as take-home recipes for how to make marijuana-infused butter and oil, along with other recipes like sauces and brownies. (Kate Bueckert/CBC)

Edible legislation coming in October

The people who have been taking the course so far seem to be people familiar with marijuana, either as medical users or people who used recreationally before cannabis was legal, Silverthorne says.

But he expects that to change in the coming months as edible legislation comes into effect in mid-October, and food items go on sale in mid-December.

“There might be a lot more people that are trying it for the first time because at this point with it still being a smokeable idea, there is still that stigma behind it,” he said.

But Silverthorne says he’s not sure marijuana will be part of meals at restaurants any time soon. The new legislation doesn’t allow for it and he says there are some concerns because marijuana takes a while for a person to feel the effects, whereas alcohol is more immediate.

This cooking oil has been infused with marijuana, which gives it that green tinge. (Kate Bueckert/CBC)

Distinct taste

The taste of the dishes will also be different than what diners might be expecting from a classic vinaigrette or hollandaise sauce, Silverthorne said.

“There is a considerable taste to it,” he said.

“What we’re gonna be seeing with the majority of these recipes is that it is standing up against other strong herbs that are going to almost mask the flavour a bit because it can be a bit pungent on its own.”

He said flavours like cilantro and basil mask the marijuana taste, so it suits dishes such as pesto or chimichurri.

The next course offering is on Saturday, but it will be offered again in the coming months.

Eli Silverthorne works in the kitchen at Stratford Chefs School. The school offers courses to the public throughout the year. The Open Kitchen classes include learning the fundamentals of cooking, trade secrets and other ‘How Do I Use That’ courses like how to use an immersion circulator or mandolins. (Kate Bueckert/CBC)

Categories
Uncategorized

A Few Things to Know Before Cooking with Cannabis – The Marijuana Times

a-few-things-to-know-before-cooking-with-cannabis
Getty

There are many different ways you can choose to enjoy cannabis. It can be smoked, vaporized, used topically, and – a favorite to many – it can be eaten. When ingested, it takes longer for the initial effects to become noticeable, and after those effects set in you will likely feel them increasing in intensity, possibly coming in waves and lasting anywhere from four to ten hours depending on a number of different factors, including how much you ate, how potent the product was and what strain was used to make the edible.

Many people are fortunate to have the option of going to a dispensary – whether it be medical or recreational – to purchase a pre-made marijuana edible. This is definitely your best chance at a consistent product, or at least one that has been tested by a lab and ensured to have a certain percentage of THC. If this is the route you choose to take, then you should be aware of the fact that you don’t need to consume much when it comes to edibles, due to the increased psychoactive effects experienced when THC turns into 11-hydroxy-THC, which is released when THC is processed by the liver. 

However, if you don’t have the option of getting a pre-made edible and want to make your own – and if you’ve never cooked with cannabis before – then you should definitely do a little research before you head into the kitchen. Otherwise you’re likely to waste a lot of bud, and no one wants to see that happen. Here are a few things to keep in mind before cooking with cannabis:

Decarboxylation is Key

One of the biggest mistakes made by cooks who are new to the world of cannabis is to just throw the bud directly into something like brownie or cake mix, and then following the normal baking or cooking directions from there. While throwing bud directly into the mix is not the most desirable way to make an edible (more on this when we get to cannabutter and oil), it won’t work at all if you simply toss the ground up plant material right into the mix. Before you can even think about doing that, you need to make sure you decarboxylate your cannabis. 

Decarboxylation is the process of heating the plant matter just to the point where the non-psychoactive THCA (which is the cannabinoid found in marijuana in its raw plant form) becomes the psychoactive THC that we all seem to enjoy so much. Both active cannabinoids, THC and CBD, start out in acid forms. THCA and CBDA, are completely non-psychoactive – meaning they won’t get you buzzed at all. So if you’ve ever tried to make a batch of edibles that just didn’t seem to have any effect, the reason is likely that this step was skipped. 

In order to decarboxylate cannabis all you need is a shallow glass baking dish or rimmed baking tray, your oven, some aluminum foil and as much bud as you will be cooking with. Then, use the process below to completely decarboxylate your cannabis.

  1. Grind up your buds – but not too fine
  2. Preheat your oven to 225 degrees
  3. Spread the ground buds evenly over the bottom of the dish or baking sheet
  4. Cover the dish or baking sheet with a single layer of aluminum foil
  5. Bake the ground up bud for a minimum of 20 minutes to a maximum of 60 minutes

The longer you leave the cannabis in the oven, the more potent the final product is likely to be. However, if you leave it in the oven too long you will end up burning off all the THC and it will be just as worthless for cooking as it was to begin with. Always remember to set a timer!

Infusing Butter and Oil Makes For More Options

When cooking with cannabis, we are no longer limited to the simple idea of throwing ground up and decarboxylate bud into a pan of brownies, a cake or a batch of cookies. Cannabutter and canna-oil are both amazing options to cook with and both are relatively simple to make. However you should note that it generally takes a minimum of two hours to make – and that’s before you make the dish you’re serving – so always ensure you have plenty of time to prepare this in advance if you are going to be making “enhanced” or “special” baked goods of foods for an event or party. 

One of the biggest benefits to using cannabutter or canna-oil – rather than simply throwing the decarboxylated flower into your mix – is the fact that you will not get the rough, ground bud in every bite you take. Instead of having a slightly grainy texture like it would otherwise, you will find that baked goods made with cannabis infused butter or oil have the same texture and more or less the same taste as any other baked good – although there will probably still be a more earthy hint to the flavor. 

If you’re planning on using cannabutter or canna-oil for your recipe then you can follow the directions below.

Cannabutter Recipe:

Before getting started you will need butter, decarboxylated ground cannabis, water, a double-boiler or slow-cooker, a glass jar or bowl and cheesecloth. 

  1. Cut up sticks of butter, and add butter, water and decarboxylated ground cannabis together on a low heat in the double-boiler or on the lowest setting of the slow cooker
  2. Continue to heat on low for a minimum of 2-4 hours, maximum 12 hours, stirring occasionally
  3. Once removed from the heat and cooled, strain butter/water mixture into glass jar or bowl using the cheesecloth as a strainer
  4. Squeeze out the cheesecloth with plant matter wrapped in the middle to get all of the butter
  5. Cover or close jar and let it sit in the fridge for a minimum of 2 hours (or until butter is solidified) 
  6. Once cooled, use a knife to separate the butter from the water and put in a jar or container for storage in the refrigerator

Canna-oil Recipe:

Before getting started you will need cooking oil (any sort will do fine, vegetable oil, olive oil, peanut oil are all acceptable so use your preferred oil), ground cannabis, a saucepan or slow cooker, a glass jar, cheesecloth (though even a coffee filter will work well enough for this).  

  1. Add ground cannabis to the bottom of the saucepan or slow cooker
  2. Add oil gradually, ensuring that all the ground buds are coated and evenly distributed
  3. Heat oil on low to a simmer – allow it to simmer on low for a minimum of 2 hours, maximum of 10-12 hours, stirring occasionally
  4. Once removed from heat and cooled, strain oil into a glass jar using the cheesecloth
  5. Press ground cannabis in the cheesecloth to remove all the oil
  6. Close jar tightly and store for cooking as you would any other oil 

When making cannabis oil you do not necessarily need to decarboxylate the cannabis, because it does so while it is heating and infusing with the oil. It does work similarly with butter, but most will suggest you decarboxylate bud for butter to reduce chlorophyll as well as creating a more potent product. When finished, butter will be a pale green to golden color and oil will be a murky brown (if you use regular vegetable oil) to gold. But, of course, depending on the strain of marijuana used and how long it was cooking the results will vary.  

Slow and Steady Wins the Race

Clearly, when it comes to cooking with cannabis, low temperatures seem to be a running theme. Heating the cannabis too quickly or at too high of a temperature will destroy your bud, rendering it burnt up and useless. On top of using low temperatures compared to normal cooking, you also need to let things like butter and oil sit and simmer for hours – which is time-consuming but well worth it for the results. 

If you try and rush the process, you will likely end up with a very dissatisfying end result. Cannabis is tricky because in order to release the THC without burning it off, the buds cannot go over a certain temperature.

The Only Limitation is Your Own Creativity

For many, one of the best things about cooking is the endless possibilities and combinations of different flavors that blend together to make a mouthwatering snack, meal, or dessert – so why stop at something as simple as brownies or a batch of extra special Christmas cookies? With cannabutter and canna-oil, the possibilities are truly endless – anything you would normally make can now be infused with cannabis to enhance the experience and flavor. 

Cooking with cannabis is definitely an adventure. And although it sounds like a lot of work and preparation, most of the time you spend doing this is just waiting and/or stirring your butter or oil while the THC infuses. Once you’ve got your final product, whichever it may be, you are ready to start cooking and you can simply follow any recipe you have, swapping out plain butter for cannabutter or plain oil for canna-oil. If you plan ahead and make enough of it, you can store the leftover butter or oil for the next time you want an extra special treat. 

Categories
Uncategorized

Marijuana Edibles Made Easy-California’s Top Butters and Oils – Leafly

Marijuana Edibles Made Easy-California’s Top Butters and Oils | Leafly


Leafly Leafly ® Loading…

Plenty of people want to try cannabis, but they don’t want to put anything into their lungs, so they turn to edibles. Problem is, overdoing edibles can be a matter of a few milligrams of THC, and everyone seems to know someone who’s gone on a psychedelic, homemade brownie journey.

But it’s 2019, and the problem is solved—at least in California where all adults age 21 and over with ID can just online-order precision-dosed baking ingredients like oils, butters, and ghee directly to their doors. There’s about 450 licensed stores and couriers.

Cook with confidence and get the effects you want with lab-tested ingredients from these leading brands:

Swap store-bought ingredients for your homemade cannabis oil, and bam! Edibles even your grandma can tolerate.

Feeling Adventurous?

Shop Cannabis Baking Ingredients at Leafly

To repeat, for the people in the back: Using ready-made cannabis infused oils and butters eliminates the guesswork involved in THC dosing for home cooks. Otherwise, it takes an analytical lab to precisely calculate the cannabinoid content of the finished products. Read the full details below.

Potli Olive Oil

250 mg THC and 250 mg CBD per 8.45-ounce container

From the makers of Potli cannabis-infused honey, this extra virgin olive oil is fortified with equal amounts of CBD and THCA, the acidic precursor to euphoric THC.

Just 1 teaspoon delivers 5 mg of THCA and 5 mg of CBD, the ideal 1:1 ratio of balanced cannabinoids, perfect for microdosing. Working with this type of cannabinoid profile enables cooks to use the oil to achieve different physiological effects.

Ingesting THCA won’t make a person feel high, so the oil can be used as-is in cold preparations such as salad dressing or dips for wellness benefits sans euphoria. However, when heated at 315°F for one hour, as noted on the metal tin, that THCA converts to THC and you will be high within two hours after eating.

Add to soups, stews, and sauces with a long simmering time to fully activate all of the THC.

Use your ready-made ingredients to create fantastic recipes such as Coconut Cherry Granola, easy Banana Bread, or gooey Chocolate Chip Walnut Cookies.

Spotted at:

Hate Cooking? Locate Fancy Cannabis Edibles Near You

500 mg THC per 10-ounce container; also available in 10 mg pouches

“I’ve got 99 problems and coconut oil solved like 86 of them.” Now a popular online meme, this joke pokes fun at how ubiquitous coconut oil is in the natural beauty community, where it’s touted as a makeup remover, lip balm, and body lotion. Known for nourishing the body inside and out, infusing coconut oil with cannabis adds even more healing power to this superfood.

Add to curries, soups, and raw desserts, measuring THC dosage at about 8 mg per teaspoon. Also look for cannabis-infused peanut butter and coated almonds from this award-winning edibles company.

Any cannabis infusion containing over 100 mg of THC is going to be accessible only to California medical patients, due to the new regulations passed in 2018. That means you need a doctor’s note for about $100 and a state medical cannabis ID card—fees and processing time varies by county.

Spotted at:

Om Edibles Olive Oil

marijuana edibles, baking ingredient

(Courtesy of Om Edibles)

100 mg THC per 2-ounce container

Drizzle into hummus, pesto, or tomato sauce for a lifted meal courtesy of this slightly more concentrated olive oil infusion; suitable for using when a small amount of oil is called for in a recipe.

Since 2008, female-led Om has taken a different approach to edibles, treating cannabis as a superfood ingredient to integrate into a healthy lifestyle. With about 8 mg of THC per teaspoon (100 mg of THC per bottle), this infused extra virgin olive oil can be purchased by any adult age 21 or older with ID, and it makes a great addition to any conscious kitchen.

Spotted at:

Vireo CBD and THC Olive Oil

50 mg THC per 8-ounce container; 75 mg CBD per container

Driven by chef Luke Reyes, this olive oil is infused with either THC or CBD, enabling people to drizzle small amounts of cannabis onto avocado toast or salads.

With a handy dosing guide on the box, Vireo makes it easy for budding cooks to safely experiment with cannabis by equating 1 teaspoon of oil to 1 mg of THC. With no discernible grassy cannabis taste, Vireo blends seamlessly into any style of food without distracting from the intended flavor of the dish.

Look for Vireo in either THC or CBD blends, available extra virgin or flavored with roasted garlic or meyer lemon.

Spotted at:

1,000 mg THC per 4-ounce container

The adult-use market limits edible products to 10 mg per serving and 100 mg per package, so it’s tougher to source potent products with appropriate portion sizes for medical users who need to ingest much higher doses of THC to relieve chronic pain, insomnia, or nausea from chemo.

Packing a lot of THC into a small container, this cannabutter delivers about 41 mg per teaspoon, making it ideal for adding to baked goods for patients who want to create potent edibles at home. Equivalent to one stick of butter, this 4 ounces of cannabutter can be melted into a recipe for cereal bars that would yield 15 bars of about 66 mg THC each.

High-dose edibles are only appropriate for people looking to manage pain and others with medical needs not satisfied by low-dose edibles available in the adult-use market.

Spotted at:

1,000 mg THC per 2-ounce container

One of the most highly concentrated cannabis cooking products on the market today, Clarified Confections’ Ghee is an excellent, cost-effective option for medical patients who need to use high doses of THC in small portion sizes. Use just 1 teaspoon to add 80 mg of THC to any meal.

Similar to clarified butter, ghee has been cooked longer to remove all water content, leaving the remaining fat with a nutty taste and a long shelf life. Since the milk solids have been removed, ghee is suitable for people who are sensitive to lactose.

Spotted at:

Got a favorite infused baking ingredient? Let Leafly know in the comments!

Elise McDonough's Bio Image

Elise McDonough

Elise McDonough is a cannabis edibles expert and author of the Bong Appétit cookbook and The Official High Times Cannabis Cookbook, and Leafly’s Product Specialist for Northern California. A veteran of the cannabis industry since 2002, McDonough has sampled over 500 edibles as a judge for the Cannabis Cup.