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4 Classic Cannabis Cookbooks We Can’t Believe Exist – Bon Appetit

This story is part of the Healthyish Guide to Cooking With, Eating, and Truly Enjoying Weed in collaboration with Broccoli. Check out this story and more in their spring issue, and click here to read more about how to make cannabis delicious.

A potboiler is a low-quality creative work that caters to the popular taste of the moment. These vintage cannabis-themed cookbooks are not that, but they are time capsules of a different moment in weed history — and they will certainly get your pot boiling (so to speak). Written decades before the legalization of cannabis was even on the table, they range in tone from novelty gift to manifesto, and though it’s unclear how seriously these were meant to be taken by their audience, the underlying message is one of normalization and acceptance. Since they come from a time before today’s strain connoisseurship, THC:CBD ratios, and fancy extraction kitchen gadgets, their offerings might be less sophisticated than modern cannabis cookbooks, but the devil-may-care approach to dosing makes cooking with weed seem fun, approachable, and nostalgically thrilling. Historically, cookbooks have been gendered reading material, and this list this lists shows that women have been interacting with weed—and taking a winkingly subversive approach to homey subjects—for decades/generations. Their recipes are served up with plentiful punning (some things about stoner culture never change), a playfulness that belies the controversiality of the topic like a spoonful of sugar to make the medicine go down.

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The Healthyish Guide to Cooking With, Eating, and Truly Enjoying Weed – Bon Appetit

“Yeah, You can put weed in that.”

That’s what my friend A, who’s a cannabis writer, says when I bring up literally any food. I used to think she was a stoner, but now I realize she’s just right.

We are putting weed in everything—but not the way we did in college when we lost an entire weekend to a single pot brownie. Cannabis, whether it’s CBD or the kind that gets you high, has become as ubiquitous in the food world as avocado toast, and it’s got a health halo to match.

We’re sipping it in seltzer, infusing it in olive oil, and (lightly) dosing our desserts—and we’re doing it for a host of reasons beyond, but, yeah, also including, getting stoned. It’s become a social thing, a sleep thing, and even, for some, a work thing.

It’s also a confusing thing. There’s almost too much information out there about cooking with and consuming weed. And the bud needs a lot of help to taste, uh, edible. On top of that, the cannabis industry is fraught with all kinds of moral and ethical problems. This guide, which we put together along with our friends at Broccoli, is meant to ease you into the world of cannabis and food with everything you need to get started: simple advice (finally, a super-straightforward way to infuse butter), hyper-specific recommendations (the CBD salt we’re sprinkling on everything), truly delicious recipes (duh!), and some Ethics 101 to help you buy weed you can feel good about…while it makes you feel good too.

So fix yourself a CBD-infused smoothie, tell Alexa to put on our custom cannabis playlist, and settle in. It’s a weird new weed world, but it should, at the very least, be delicious. — Amanda Shapiro, Healthyish editor

This package is a collaboration with our friends at Broccoli: A Magazine for Cannabis Lovers. Get their spring issue now!

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How to Make Weed Butter for Absolute Beginners – Bon Appetit

This guide is excerpted from The Art of Weed Butter by Mennlay Golokeh Aggrey. It’s part of the Healthyish Guide to Cooking With, Eating, and Truly Enjoying Weed in collaboration with Broccoli. Check out their spring issue, and click here to read more about how to make cannabis delicious.

Listen, you don’t have to be a master chef or cannabis connoisseur to make legit weed butter. You just need to be well-informed, patient, and organized. At the end of the day, making cannabis butter is just a very efficient way of consuming weed. It’s inconspicuous, versatile, and approachable. And I really enjoy how cannabutter helps to minimize the stigma of weed—especially in the black community. It means everything to me when middle-aged black women, like my 80-year-old great Auntie Mildred, can be provided with options like cannabis edibles to help find relief from pain symptoms.

With the same principles as making weed butter, you can create infused sesame chili oil to drizzle on rice dishes, or elevated coconut oil to use for your next face oil mask.

The following recipe loosely translates into 30 mg of THC per tablespoon of oil or butter. Your perfect dose will vary, but 10 mg is standard. Start by testing ¼ teaspoon of the weed butter you make and wait for about an hour. Take note of how you feel and let your body tell you whether this is a good amount, if you need more, or if you need less. Erring on the side of caution will ensure that you actually enjoy yourself and have a positive experience.

Step 1: Decarboxylation

The first thing you’ll have to do is decarboxylate your cannabis. Also known as “decarbing,” this requires you to bake your weed, allowing the THC, CBD and other cannabinoids to activate. Also, it allows for lipids in butter and oil to easily bind to your weed for the ultimate cannabis infusion.

What you’ll need:

  • ½ ounce of weed
  • Hand grinder or scissors
  • Glass baking dish or sheet pan
  • Oven

What to do:

  1. Preheat the oven to 220° F.
  2. Gently break apart the desired amount of weed using a hand-grinder, scissors, or with hands until it’s the perfect consistency for rolling a joint— fine, but not too fine. Anything too fine will slip through cheesecloth (or a joint, for that matter). You want your cannabutter and oil to be clean and as clear as possible.
  3. Evenly spread your plant material onto the glass baking dish or sheet pan. Pop in the oven on the center rack for 20 minutes if using old or lower quality weed; 45 minutes for cured, high-grade weed; or 1 hour or more for anything that has been recently harvested and is still wet.
  4. Check on the weed frequently while it’s in the oven, gently mixing it every 10 minutes so as to not burn it. You will notice that the color of your herb will change from bright green to a deep brownish green. That’s when you know it has decarboxylated.

Step 2: Cannabutter Stovetop Infusion

If you have weed, fat, time, and a kitchen, you can make weed butter with this method.

What You’ll Need:

  • 1½ cup water
  • 8 ounces clarified butter, melted butter, or oil
  • ½ ounce decarboxylated cannabis
  • Medium saucepan
  • Wooden spoon
  • Thermometer, optional cheesecloth and/or metal strainer

What to do:

  1. In a medium saucepan on very low heat, add water and butter.
  2. When the butter is melted, add the decarboxylated cannabis. Mix well with a wooden spoon and cover with lid.
  3. Let mixture gently simmer for 4 hours. Stir every half hour to make sure your butter isn’t burning. If you have a thermometer, check to make sure the temperature doesn’t reach above 180°.
  4. After 4 hours, strain with cheesecloth or metal strainer into a container. Let the butter cool to room temperature. Use immediately or keep in refrigerator or freezer in a well-sealed mason jar for up to six months.

How to use weed butter:

I’ve been slipping a little weed into a lot of recipes that aren’t in my cookbook. Most recently, I combined one tablespoon of canna-infused olive oil with 3 tablespoons of non-weed virgin olive oil to dress this juicy Charred Raw Corn salad. (It came out to 30 mg for the entire dish, and 7.5 mg per serving). It blew my mind. And not because I was stoned. I also have this thing for eating hot soup all year long, and my most recent soup fix was Chicken and Rice Soup with Garlicky Chile Oil. I spiked the garlic chile oil with weed, swapping in two tablespoons of canna-infused sesame oil for two tablespoons of vegetable oil. You can also sub a few teaspoons of infused oil into baked goods, like breakfast blondies or chocolate tahini brownies.

Find more recipes for cooking with cannabutter in The Art of Weed Butter, available for $10 on Amazon or wherever books are sold.

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Cannabis Foods: Hamburgers, Cookies, Candy – Healthline

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Carl’s Jr. offered this cannabis-infused hamburger at one of its Denver restaurants last Saturday. Getty Images

Marijuana users with a case of the munchies celebrated 4/20, the annual marijuana holiday, by ordering a burger infused with cannabidiol oil at a Carl’s Jr. restaurant in Denver last Saturday.

The Rocky Mountain High Cheese Burger Delight represented the first time a major fast-food chain has incorporated the cannabis extract — derived from hemp — into a food item.

But while the Carl’s Jr. burger was a one-day promotion, there are a wide variety of foods being made with cannabidiol (CBD) as well as marijuana, including at least one restaurant franchise with dreams of opening cannabis pizza joints from coast to coast.

Marijuana has long been used as an ingredient in food for users who wanted to get high but didn’t want to smoke.

In addition to the classic “pot brownies,” the mainstreaming of medical marijuana — now legal in 33 states and Washington, D.C. — has given rise to a cottage industry of producing marijuana edibles.

Cookies, gummies, and hard candies infused with THC can be found for sale right alongside loose marijuana at dispensaries where the drug is legal for medical use.

Cannabis-based compounds have been touted for health benefits from pain relief to acne prevention, but some experts caution there hasn’t been enough research done to know the short-term and long-term health benefits of regularly ingesting these compounds, either by smoking them or eating them.

And a recent study catalogued how many emergency room visits in one city were related to eating cannabis-infused foods and what health problems the edibles caused.

There are dozens of professional chefs who are incorporating cannabis into the dishes they serve, including multicourse, fine-dining experiences.

Mindy Segal, who won the James Beard Foundation’s Outstanding Pastry Chef Award in 2012, makes sophisticated cannabis candies.

Michael Magallanes, who worked in Michelin-starred restaurants in the San Francisco area, cooks with hashish and sprinkles powdered cannabis on dishes during private gourmet dinners.

The fortuitously named Stoner’s Pizza Joint, a small pizza chain based in South Carolina, hopes to incorporate CBD and eventually THC into its recipes as it rapidly expands in the next few years.

The chain’s plans are due in part to the growing interest in cannabis cooking and financial backing from Sol Global, a Canadian cannabis investment firm.

“I’ve been cooking with cannabis for more than 20 years, but the bottom line is it hasn’t been acceptable until now,” Glenn Cybulski, the company’s president and chief culinary officer, told Healthline.

He adds that Stoner’s Pizza wants to become the leader in exploring the savory side of edible cannabis, including infusions of salad dressings, sauces, and even pizza crust.

The 2018 Farm Bill passed by Congress removed hemp containing only trace amounts of THC — tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis — from the Controlled Substances Act.

That, in turn, has opened up a broad, legal market for products containing CBD extracts from hemp.

While THC remains illegal under federal law, CBD is now legal in all 50 U.S. states.

Proponents say there are a wide variety of health benefits for THC and CBD, from pain reduction to acne prevention.

Thus far, however, the Food and Drug Administration has only approved a few cannabis-based drugs. These include a synthetic THC to fight nausea and a CBD-based drug for the treatment of seizures associated with two rare forms of epilepsy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome.

In Europe, a drug called Sativex that contains both THC and CBD is used to treat spasticity and pain associated with multiple sclerosis.

Nonetheless, cooking with cannabis has been creeping toward the mainstream as chefs work to educate consumers that infused dishes can be both safe and healthy.

Controlling dosage can be a challenge when cooking with CBD or THC, especially for home chefs like Christine Manente, a Connecticut resident who holds a state-issued medical marijuana card and used cannabis to blunt the pain from a work-related injury.

“I have a brownie pan that splits into 18 equal size pieces,” she told Healthline. “I’m a lightweight, so I can handle half of a brownie to help with the relief of pain without being wasted. I don’t love that feeling.”

“Smoking does not translate to ingestion of edibles,” Daniel Winer, director of marketing for the Canada-based cannabis retailer Starbuds, told Healthline.

“When absorbed through the lungs, THC is absorbed immediately and then dissipates. With edibles, THC-9 is turned to THC-11 when it is being broken down,” he said.

“This is why edibles experiences not only last longer but are often more intense. If you are new to edibles, start with 5 milligrams. Wait an hour after consumption to see how you feel and go from there,” Winer added.

For commercial use, there can’t be guesswork about how much THC or CBD is in a bite of food, or where the cannabis comes from, says Cybulski.

“Our guests need to know that we have gone to a level of making sure the purity is there,” he said.

He notes that Stoner’s intends to track every step of cannabis production from farm to table.

“Consumers want to ingest cannabis how they eat,” Andrea Drummer, food editor for cannabisMD, told Healthline. “They want to eat a full, complete meal.”

That means dishing out THC in small doses rather than one big hit that leaves diners stoned before they get to the second or third course.

Top cannabis chefs are highly educated about the various strains and potencies of the plants they use, says Drummer.

“Sourcing plants is as important as sourcing a great piece of fish or an organic turnip,” she said.

That goes for flavor as well as strength, especially when using the plant in recipes, she says.

California Blue Dream cannabis tends to have sweeter flavor notes that work well in a creme brûlée, for example, while OG Kush is more pungent and can be added to robust sauces like mole.

Chefs or anyone else who wants to cook with cannabis must first convert the raw THC-A in the cannabis plant into the psychoactive THC.

Heat is the key, which isn’t a problem when cannabis is smoked. For edibles, however, the cannabis must first be decarboxylated, which means baking it in an oven.

“Once this is done, you can do anything you want with your cannabis,” said Winer. “It can be eaten right there. However, we advise infusing an oil or butter with it. This will help stretch your cannabis and make it way more delicious.”

“The key is to not let your oil or butter get too hot,” cautioned Winer. “Doing so will turn your THC/CBD to CBN, which has a more sedative effect.”

One of the quirks about cooking with cannabis is that, unlike other food ingredients, the goal sometimes is to minimize the flavor of the plant, not enhance it.

“I was cooking with cannabis/coconut oil,” Kay Pointing, a former pharmaceutical company employee who learned to cook with cannabis while living in the Caribbean, told Healthline. “It’s a very heavy oil but vegan and pleasant to cook with, and it helps to mask the cannabis flavor which can taint food flavors.”

Like many DIY cannabis chefs, Pointing began making jellies and hard candies for medical users, not recreational users.

“My friend’s father had terminal prostate cancer, so I produced tempting edibles to encourage him to eat,” she said. “It increased his appetite and relieved pain. The potheads want strength, but most people using for medical reasons need smaller amounts in manageable doses.”

Drinks as well as food are being infused with cannabis.

Warren Bobrow, author of the book “Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails, and Tonics,” is a skeptic about CBD oil. He calls it “snake oil” whose effects — if any — are negated by alcohol. But he’s a big believer in infusing drinks with THC.

“I have glaucoma. I can medicate in a Negroni — a stoney Negroni,” he told Healthline.

A master mixologist, Bobrow says the strength of a THC drink can be manipulated, just like one containing only alcohol.

“It’s up to the drinker,” he said. “From mild to wild.”

Experts do issue some cautions on regular cannabis use.

A study published last week analyzed emergency room visits between January 2012 and December 2016 at a large urban hospital in Colorado.

The researchers reported 9,973 emergency room visits that showed signs of cannabis use.

Of those, 2,567 visits were determined to be at least partially attributable to cannabis.

Of those, 238 patients had eaten a cannabis product as opposed to smoking or otherwise ingesting the compound.

The researchers reported that the edible cannabis patients were more likely to be suffering from psychiatric symptoms, intoxication, and cardiovascular issues than the other cannabis-related patients.

“Visits attributable to inhaled cannabis are more frequent than those attributable to edible cannabis, although the latter is associated with more acute psychiatric visits and more [emergency room] visits than expected,” the researchers wrote.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) does highlight some of the benefits of cannabis products for conditions such as epilepsy and post-traumatic stress order.

In her testimony before Congress in 2016, Susan R.B. Weiss, Ph.D., the director of the NIDA’s Division of Extramural Research, said it’s essential that more research needs to be done on the effects of marijuana-related treatments.

“In general, adequate and well-controlled studies are lacking, which means that patients across the country are using marijuana strains and extracts that have not undergone rigorous clinical trials, are not regulated for consistency or quality, and are used for medical conditions with an insufficient evidence base supporting their effectiveness,” she said.

On its Drugs Facts web page, the NIDA notes that when a person eats or drinks cannabis-related compounds, the effects from THC ingredients take longer to show up in the brain and other organs than when they smoke the compounds.

The organization states that THC can cause the brain to “overactivate” and produce short-term symptoms such as altered senses, mood swings, impaired body movement, and impaired cognitive functions.

The organization added that long-term use of marijuana can affect brain development.

“When people begin using marijuana as teenagers, the drug may impair thinking, memory, and learning functions and affect how the brain builds connections between the areas necessary for these functions. Researchers are still studying how long marijuana’s effects last and whether some changes may be permanent,” the web page states.

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How to Cook With Weed—and a Dash of Tasty, Tasty Science – WIRED

Mac and cheese. Peanut butter and jelly. Asparagus and … cannabis oil with a citrusy terpene profile? Welcome to food pairings in the heady era of cannabis legalization.

A new breed of chef is thriving, experimenting with how to infuse dishes with weed, whose various strains might smell and taste of lemon or mushroom or grain. And, of course, they can complement that taste with the intoxicating experience of THC, like traditional chefs might pair foods with particular wines. It’s all nerdy as hell, and it just so happens that one of the top cannabis chefs in America, Michael Magallanes, is also a chef in WIRED’s San Francisco office. (To be clear, the food he cooks for us is great, but decidedly weed-free.) So on this 420, come with us on a science-packed journey into the frontier of cannabis cuisine.

First, we need to talk about what cannabis does to the human body. When you inhale cannabis vapor from a distilled oil, or you smoke pure flower, THC travels along an unobstructed avenue from the lungs right into the bloodstream. From there, the THC molecules head into the brain and interact with the endocannabinoid system, fitting nicely into the CB1 receptor to produce psychoactive effects.

THC eventually hits the liver after smoking, but not in nearly the same amounts as when you eat cannabis. With this avenue, THC makes a beeline from your stomach to your liver, where your body metabolizes it into something called 11-hydroxy-THC. “The liver’s main job is to make things water-soluble, so they can be excreted and exit the body,” says Jeff Raber, CEO of the Werc Shop, a cannabis lab. “If they stayed in our body and built up, wow, it would be bad.”

The tricky bit about the liver doing its metabolization thing with THC is that 11-hydroxy-THC is five times as potent as its precursor. Which is why edibles can hit you so damn hard, and why cannabis chefs are very methodical about their work.

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You see, THC in the plant naturally comes in the form of tetrahydrocannabinolic acid, or THCA, which is non-psychoactive. It’s only after you heat THCA, in a process called decarboxylation, that it transforms into THC, though tiny amounts will convert naturally over time at room temperature. So cannabis chef Michael Magallanes’ first step (again, outside the WIRED offices) was figuring out how long to heat his weed and at what temperature. “It probably took a good month of doing different times and temperatures and sending those to a lab,” he says. The lab in turn gave him THC readings. “Now I have a really consistent way of doing it.” Specifically, he puts the cannabis in a bag in boiling water at 100 degrees Celsius for between an hour and a half and two hours.

From there, Magallanes infuses the cannabis into various kinds of cooking oils, such as coconut or olive. This he does at a lower temperature, to avoid converting even more THCA into THC (thus throwing off his careful calculations), for four to five hours. He can then add these oils to things like purees or other foods that don’t involve high-heat cooking.

Because he works with oil—as opposed to infusing THC into a meal’s main ingredient—Magallanes can be very precise with his doses and tailor them to match guests’ preferences. Novices tend to do best with between 3 and 5 milligrams of THC over the course of the meal, while experienced cannabis users (particularly medical users) will go up to 1,000 milligrams. “Then it’s just a matter of getting the right plate to the right person,” says Magallanes. “I haven’t had any complications with that so far.”

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Cooking with Cannabis – Tucson Weekly

The kitchen where Jane Monday, a 70-year-old baker known to many of her friends and coworkers as “grandma,” does her work looks like any other industrial kitchen. A piece of paper attached to a stainless steel refrigerators details a list of products like “World’s Finest Brownie,” “Snickerdoodle” and “Krispie Treats.” The Backstreet Boys are singing about the age-old desire to turn back time on the radio. Hairnetted employees are carefully pouring melted truffle chocolate into molds.

Then Monday will say something like, “I really like hash. I’m old school,” and you’ll remember where you really are: at Cornucopia Health & Wellness, one of the first edible companies in Arizona.

Monday started the kitchen back in 2012, though she’s been baking pastries professionally for 15 years and cooking for about 50. Years and years ago, she and her friends would combine cannabis with butter and make themselves brownies, an amateur foreshadowing of Cornucopia.

Of course, times were different then—she and her friends never knew how strong the brownies would be. Now, with the legalization of the medical use of cannabis in Arizona in 2010, the affair is much more structured. Monday says she likes to keep three things in mind for Cornucopia’s products: They want to make items that taste good, are dosed evenly, and that are familiar to people. All of their products, including vegan, gluten-free and sugar-free options, are made from scratch and use only whole-plant extractions.

“We want our stuff to be good, not just get you stoned,” she says simply.

Each batch of goods at Cornucopia gets its own number, with details about the plant and extraction it contains. Customers can call to ask about any product they’ve bought, and Monday can tell them the day it was made, and even who made it.

She knows a lot about the supply chain of the product, considering the chain is located almost entirely onsite. Purple doors in a hallway off the kitchen hide temperature- and humidity-controlled grow rooms with different strains of cannabis plants. A bit further down the hall are several labs where scientists extract the plants’ THC for use in baking as well as concentrates for products that are smoked or vaped.

Christian Hernandez is a lab manager who talks about supercritical states, terpenes and decarboxylation with dizzying proficiency. His eyes light up when you ask him a question about the process of extracting different kinds of CBD oils from cannabis. His eyes light up even if you don’t ask. Monday likes to say the University of Arizona biochemistry grad “thinks in molecules.” She also says his dedication has ensured their products are more consistent than ever.

Work by Hernandez and the other lab managers produces the tar-like THC extract that’s mixed with oils that are baked into cookies and brownies. There are no preservatives in anything, except for the gummies. They sell products with doses of THC ranging from 5 mg to 120 mg.

<a href="https://media1.fdncms.com/tucsonweekly/imager/u/original/24882295/1.jpg" data-caption="Bakers use molds to craft marijuana candy.   courtesy photo” class=”uk-display-block uk-position-relative uk-visible-toggle”> Bakers use molds to craft marijuana candy. - COURTESY PHOTO

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Bakers use molds to craft marijuana candy.

“We sell a lot of those,” Monday says of the 120 mg truffles. “I couldn’t imagine eating one.”

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Monday uses only small amounts of medicinal cannabis, but is a big supporter of its benefits. In many ways, Cornucopia is a family affair. She makes her German chocolate brownies with her grandmother’s German frosting. Her sister, one of the original members of the kitchen crew, lived for six years after being diagnosed with terminal lung cancer, and believed cannabis improved both her longevity and quality of life. The 5 mg “Judy Bears” Cornucopia sells now are in honor of her memory.

“I truly believe that since hemp has been taken out of the food chain, cancers and other maladies have exploded,” Monday says. “I think we’re lacking that nutrient in our system. I think recreational is fine—I’d rather see people do that than drink. But the medicinal properties are just unparalleled.”

Jean-Paul Genet, a co-owner of the Purple Med/Green Med dispensaries that make Cornucopia products, says he got into the business because he’s a cancer survivor himself. He says he was diagnosed with leukemia in 1977, and doctors told him he had three or four months to live. He headed to a clinic for no-hopes run by a friend of a friend in Mexico.

“Part of what you learned was how to cultivate herbs and make tinctures and extracts, including cannabis,” he said. “I’m 69 now. I was 27 when that happened, and I’ve never been on a prescription pill since.”

With Cornucopia, Jane and her team aim to provide the medical benefits of cannabis to Southern Arizonans, one handmade chocolate chip cookie at a time.

For more information on purchasing Cornucopia products, visit azcornucopia.com.

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Put down the pot brownies: A new crop of cannabis books is blazing a path to more refined cooking – The Washington Post

For the cultured cannabis user, the pot brownie has become passe. What has taken its place is something altogether more exciting, albeit complicated. In the new era of cannabis cookbooks, putting weed in your food can be an art, a science and a craft.

I think it says a lot about this . . . industry that we are all moving in this sophisticated direction,” said cannabis cookbook author Robyn Griggs Lawrence. Cannabis is becoming “just another ingredient.”

It’s not just any ingredient, though. Wanna get high? If you buy a cannabis cookbook, get ready to learn chemistry, botany and math.

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People have been putting weed in their food as long as people have been cooking. Lawrence’s forthcoming book “Pot in Pans: A History of Eating Cannabis” begins with a chapter titled “Cavepeople Ate Cannabis,” citing research suggesting that humans began cultivating the crop in the Mesolithic era. Bhang, an Indian cannabis drink with spiritual associations, was referenced in scriptures dating to 1000 B.C. A Moroccan cannabis confection, majoun, also has historic roots. But many Americans’ introduction began in 1954 with Gertrude Stein’s partner, Alice B. Toklas, whose “Alice B. Toklas Cookbook” famously included a recipe for hashish fudge (the author reportedly did not realize the recipe contained cannabis, and didn’t test the recipe before submitting it to her publisher). That recipe evolved into the pot brownie after a famous scene in the Peter Sellers film “I Love You, Alice B. Toklas,” in which a hippie character puts a special ingredient in her brownie mix.

One of the earliest cannabis-themed cookbooks — really, a pamphlet — is 1967’s “The Hashish Cookbook,” by Panama Rose, a nom de plume of the artist Ira Cohen. But the cannabis cookbook wave kicked off with the 2012 publication of “The Official High Times Cannabis Cookbook,” from the editors of the cannabis-themed publication. Though a few came before it, the High Times book remains a top seller in the niche, with NPD BookScan reporting 27,000 copies sold.

High Times “was really the first publication to treat this as something other than ‘throw some weed into brownies’ and have it work,” said Lawrence. “They were the first ones to really start educating.”

Because, despite how they do it in the movies, you’re not actually supposed to put weed directly into your brownies. Time for a chemistry lesson: Every book will give you one, with varying levels of detail and dense, academic language. To activate the psychoactive properties of THC, it must go through a process called decarboxylation: the removal of CO2 according to the book “Sweet Mary Jane,” or “removing the carboxyl molecule found in THCA (the non-psychoactive acidic form)” in “Bong Appetit.” These are all very scientific ways to say: Heat your marijuana up. The classic way is to bake it for 30 minutes at low heat — too hot, and you’ll burn off some of your weed and waste money. You can also use a sous-vide circulator. (Or you can buy a device called the Magical Butter.)

But you don’t simply stick that decarboxylated weed into brownies, either. “Cannabinoids are hydrophobic” but fat-soluble, write the “Bong Appetit” editors. “Absorbing cannabis into your body along with fat also makes it more bioavailable, meaning it feels more potent in your body.” In layman’s terms: infuse it in butter, oil or cream, a process that will take several hours and require a mesh strainer and cheesecloth.

The stoners have all become scientists.

“They’re just trying to fight the stigma,” said Ngaio Bealum, of Netflix’s culinary cannabis show, “Cooking on High,” and a former purveyor of edibles. “So it’s, ‘We’re not just stoners, we’re all very fancy-a– cooks up in here. We’re very precise and scientific, and these recipes are state of the art,’ or whatnot.”

The precision isn’t just for show. Edibles makers need to get the dosing right. Eating cannabis is not like smoking it, and it takes much longer to have an effect. Many make the rookie mistake of eating too much, or drinking alcohol with their edibles, and the results can be unpleasant. Most recipes are designed to give people a very low, exact dose — typically three to seven milligrams. Authors recommend starting slow.

But if you get the dosing right, you still have to nail the recipe, which can be complicated. You could make the tower of maple-cream canna-puffs in “The 420 Gourmet.” Or infused blueberry-lemon maracons — a confection that can be hard for regular cooks to master even without the weed — from “Edibles.” Having company over? “Bong Appetit” suggests you make an infused whole sea bream stuffed with cannabis leaves, or poach a four-pound octopus in infused cannabis oil.

Are home cooks actually stewing whole octopuses in cannabis? In the Venn diagram of stoners and excellent cooks, it’s impossible to know how large the overlapping sliver is. And there are always cooks who love an intense project — weed cooking intersects nicely with 2017’s sous-vide craze in that way. But the books are also a novelty and a gift that can be given to people who may never cook from them. They’re for “people who are merely curious who want to look cool, and the people who just want to buy a gift for their Woodstock-going parents,” said Rux Martin, the editorial director of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

“There are probably some books on my bookshelf that I haven’t cooked from, but I bought because [they’re] inspiring,” said Stephanie Hua, one of the authors of the recently published “Edibles” and the founder of Mellows, a cannabis marshmallow company. “There may be a disconnect. But I think that isn’t really cannabis-specific.

That said, the books all contain intro-level tinctures and infusions, and easy dishes such as mac and cheese, too. “It isn’t going to be the French Laundry,” said Hua.

Besides, any fussiness is a deliberate counterbalance to perceptions of cannabis food: that it’s all gummy bears and brownies. The more sophisticated the recipes, the more they inspire people to think about cannabis like wine, and the more respectability it earns.

Still, every book still has a brownie recipe. Sometimes, reluctantly.

“We actually originally presented our manuscript without a brownie recipe in it,” said Hua. “We have a killer blondie recipe, and we were like, ‘Let’s make a point. Like, not put a brownie in there.’ And our publisher was like, ‘No, this has to have a brownie in it.’”

Hua’s Booty Call Brownies have become one of the most popular recipes from the book.

The cookbook publishing industry’s enthusiasm for cannabis is a recent development.

Martin recalled that only four years ago, her company turned down an opportunity for a weed cookbook. “Fast forward about a year and a half later, and the entire landscape changed, and every publisher got in and was racing to catch up,” she said.

Including her: Next year, her company will publish “The Essential Scratch and Sniff Guide to Becoming a Cannabis Connoisseur,” by Richard Betts.

Earlier books skewed toward hippie-inspired recipes. Their covers were usually green, with prominent cannabis leaves. But the new books are stylish, emphasizing pink with splashes of green (preppy!), and with gorgeous photography that mimics the aesthetic of Instagram. They’re marketed toward women and moms, and they would look perfectly at home on a coffee table with some scented candles. They reflect the latest Pew data: Majorities of millennials (74 percent), Gen Xers (63 percent), baby boomers (54 percent) and women across age groups (56 percent) support cannabis legalization.

Lawrence also wrote “The Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook” and said she hoped it would find an audience of women like her. “We really wanted it to be something that a volleyball mom like me could have out on her counter and not feel weird about,” she said. “No fluorescent green.”

Many of the books’ recipes tend to be American or European, and while there are authors of color — including Hua, cannabis chef Andrea Drummer and Cedella Marley, daughter of musician Bob Marley — cannabis cookbooks seem to be increasingly geared toward white upper-middle-class moms. It’s something that Mennlay Golokeh Aggrey was trying to remedy with her recent book, “The Art of Weed Butter.” Aggrey is an African American cookbook author who lives in Mexico. Along with the recipes for brownies and mac and cheese, her readers will also learn how to make West African fried chicken and chacahua coconut beans and rice. She says the target audience for her book — middle-aged black women — has responded to seeing themselves reflected in the book’s origins, including the photos of Aggrey demonstrating recipes. A reader told her that “coming from another black woman, like, that felt more safe, even just to [see] your brown hands infusing something,” she said.

Aggrey also doesn’t shy away from politics and race in her book. She outlines the history of mass incarceration for cannabis offenses and its disproportionate effect on African American communities in a section that ends with the statement: “Sorry for the buzzkill.”

As legalization continues to spread, we’ll be seeing more and more cannabis cookbooks — and they’ll continue to evolve. Some will become more health-oriented, as patients explore medicinal cannabis. Others might dip further into chemistry and botany — particularly terpenes, the naturally occurring chemical compounds that create cannabis’s distinctive taste and smell — for readers who really want to nerd out. And once more people grasp the basics, those lessons in the beginning of each book might become shorter.

“There’s a level of understanding. So you don’t have to go back to square one each time,” said Marc Gerald, a literary agent who represented the author of “Sweet Mary Jane” and the rapper/chef/author/stoner Action Bronson. “The books are probably [becoming] more specific.”

And more authors and personalities — not just Bronson, Martha and Snoop Dogg — will distinguish themselves. Bealum, who is pitching a cannabis food and travel show, hopes to be one of them.

“There’s approximately umpteen-kajillion people who want to be the Anthony Bourdain of weed,” Bealum said.

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7 Cannabis Cookbooks For Every Level of Home Chef – Book Riot

Marijuana legalization is on the rise in America, and so are the cannabis cookbooks at the bookstore. As a cooking novice—seriously, salad is about as complex as I get—I find all recipes, even the ones that don’t include weed, intimidating. But luckily for the cooking-challenged, pot-themed cookbooks exist at all levels. Whether you’re more the frozen meals type or next in line for Top Chef, there are cannabis cookbooks for you.

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Weed butter is one of the easiest ways to infuse meals of all kinds with marijuana. In this book, cannabis expert Mennlay Golokeh Aggrey helps you fine-tune your skills. The author’s website describes her as “an interdisciplinary cannabis entrepreneur” working to “navigate a future for women of color in the cannabis industry,” which is super cool and very much necessary. She’s also bound to transform your pot brownie skills with her knowledge.

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Bite-sized is best! Serve up an impressive platter of fried mac and cheese bites, blueberry macarons, or spiced superfood truffles, all found in this book of marijuana-infused small bites.

The Marijuana Chef Cookbook5. The Marijuana Chef Cookbook by S.T. Oner

For a basic primer in marijuana cooking, you can’t beat this classic. Now available in color, The Marijuana Chef Cookbook offers 55 recipes, including vegan and vegetarian options, and demonstrates several methods to extract cannabis, including butter and alcohol tinctures. There’s even a section on passing a drug test, which, you know—it’s there if you need it, I guess.

Baked Italian6. Baked Italian: Over 50 Mediterranean Marijuana Meals by Yzabetta Sativa

Those who adhere to a Mediterranean diet (or just really like pasta) are in luck—there’s a weed cookbook for that! Baked Italian is ideal for anyone who has always dreamed of eating their lamb carpaccio with a side of anxiety-reducing buzz.

Cooking with Herb7. Cooking with Herb: 75 Recipes for the Marley Natural Lifestyle by Cedella Marley

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Categories
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7 Cannabis Cookbooks For Every Level of Chef – Book Riot

Marijuana legalization is on the rise in America, and so are the cannabis cookbooks at the bookstore. As a cooking novice—seriously, salad is about as complex as I get—I find all recipes, even the ones that don’t include weed, intimidating. But luckily for the cooking-challenged, pot-themed cookbooks exist at all levels. Whether you’re more the frozen meals type or next in line for Top Chef, there are cannabis cookbooks for you.

No matter your level of home chef expertise, you'll want to check out these cannabis cookbooks. cookbooks | cannabis cookbooks | cooking with cannabis | book lists

Confused about the marijuana laws in your state? Make sure you do your research before whipping up some weed-infused gravlax.

1. Bong Appetit: Mastering the Art of Cooking with Weed by the editors of MUNCHIES

For the more advanced cannabis chefs who want to move beyond basic brownies. If you’ve ever dreamed of impressing your dinner guests with weed chimichurri or cannabis leaf pesto, this is the cookbook for you. Bong Appétit features beautiful photography and sophisticated recipes for everything from infusions to meat, poultry, and seafood dishes.

The Easy Cannabis Cookbook2. The Easy Cannabis Cookbook: 60+ Medical Marijuana Recipes for Sweet and Savory Edibles by Cheri Sicard

In The Easy Cannabis Cookbook, Cheri Sicard (aka “Cannabis Cheri“) breaks down more than 60 simple pot-based recipes. If you’ve ever dreamed of waking up with weed eggs Benedict in the morning, this is your moment.

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The Art of Weed Butter3. The Art of Weed Butter: A Step-by-Step Guide to Becoming a Cannabutter Master by Mennlay Golokeh Aggrey

Weed butter is one of the easiest ways to infuse meals of all kinds with marijuana. In this book, cannabis expert Mennlay Golokeh Aggrey helps you fine-tune your skills. The author’s website describes her as “an interdisciplinary cannabis entrepreneur” working to “navigate a future for women of color in the cannabis industry,” which is super cool and very much necessary. She’s also bound to transform your pot brownie skills with her knowledge.

Edibles4. Edibles: Small Bites for the Modern Cannabis Kitchen by Stephanie Hua and Coreen Carroll

Bite-sized is best! Serve up an impressive platter of fried mac and cheese bites, blueberry macarons, or spiced superfood truffles, all found in this book of marijuana-infused small bites.

The Marijuana Chef Cookbook5. The Marijuana Chef Cookbook by S.T. Oner

For a basic primer in marijuana cooking, you can’t beat this classic. Now available in color, The Marijuana Chef Cookbook offers 55 recipes, including vegan and vegetarian options, and demonstrates several methods to extract cannabis, including butter and alcohol tinctures. There’s even a section on passing a drug test, which, you know—it’s there if you need it, I guess.

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