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It’s a weederful life: Cooking with cannabis | Restaurants – Santa Fe New Mexican

Toto, we’re not in pot brownie territory anymore.

The use of medical and recreational marijuana is on the rise across the country. This year Michigan became the 10th state to legalize recreational weed, and 33 states, including New Mexico, license marijuana for medicinal purposes. It’s commonly used to treat pain, insomnia, anxiety, depression, and even epilepsy, though its effect on these and other maladies continues to be studied. In New Mexico, to consume marijuana, you must apply to the state Department of Health’s Medical Cannabis Program, which includes the completion by a health care provider of a medical certification form. The approval process can take up to 30 days.

Though smoking has long been the preferred method of consumption, edibles — foods cooked, infused, marinated, dressed, sauced, or garnished with marijuana or a derivative thereof — are becoming an increasingly popular way to reap the benefits of pot. As with smokable marijuana, edibles contain cannabinoids: both the well-known tetrahydrocannabinol (THC),  marijuana’s main psychoactive compound, and the increasingly popular cannabidiol (CBD), a cannabis derivative that is non-psychotropic: While it won’t get you stoned, it has been shown to have the same benefits. Edibles offer a form of cannabis consumption that is more versatile and discreet than smoking, and their effects can be more potent and long-lasting because the cannabinoids are digested and absorbed through the liver (whereas with smoking, they are inhaled through the lungs and bypass the liver).

Forward-thinking food professionals started jumping on the bandwagon years ago: In 2015, for example, James Beard Award-winning pastry chef and cookbook author Mindy Segal launched a line of “medicated” sweets. Jump to 2017, when according to a report by Arcview Market Research and BDS Analytics, people in Canada and the United States spent more than $1 billion on edibles. That number is projected to grow beyond $4 billion in the next four years. Californians alone will spend roughly $1.3 billion on edibles by 2022.

Dispensaries across Santa Fe sell a wide variety of weed-based victuals. The team at Best Daze (4641 Airport Road, 505-585-4937) — led by COO Eli Goodman and, in the kitchen, Ryan Lampro (of ChocolateSmith and Whoo’s Donuts fame) — creates a staggering roster of goodies, from chocolates and very-popular gummies to cakes, cookies, tarts, crackers, and donuts with infused fillings. Founded by native Santa Fean Minka Ingersoll and chef/nutritionist Fred Lucas, Kure Cannabis (220 N. Guadalupe St.,505-930-5339) sells truffles, cookies, and candies. Their two in-house cooks dream up fantastic special and custom treats, including cakes, tarts, cupcakes, and stunners like the Chocolate Crunch Nugget, filled with sunflower seeds, almonds, and Rice Krispies and topped with cranberries. The Santa Fe Oxygen & Healing Bar – Apothecary (133 W. San Francisco St., 505-986-5037) sells CBD-based gummies, candies, and protein bars, among other products; and their restaurant regularly features a CBD cookie sandwich as well as CBD-infused chile-cheese roasted potatoes and yucca (essentially souped-up chile cheese fries, no?) available with regular or vegan cheese. They also offer the option of adding CBD oil to any other dish on the menu.

Turns out pretty much any food you might decide to cook at home can be transformed into a “medible” with relative ease, and the resources for cooking with cannabis continue to grow as legalization spreads. Intrepid cooks interested in solo experimentation can turn to any of several major cannabis-related publications, including the great-grandfather of the genre, High Times, as well as Dope and the recently launched Kitchen Toke. In addition to triumphant tales of the benefits of cannabis, that magazine and its website offer tips and tasty recipes (in both written and video form) for everything from canna-butter to lime-curry chickpea salad and a cranberry-thyme mimosa sweetened with CBD honey. In one video, Derek Simcik, executive chef of the Thompson Hotel in Seattle, clarifies some of the issues surrounding cooking with cannabis: “You can actually use cannabis like you would wine, as a pairing,” he says, “taking two completely different flavors and helping each other better themselves. This is something that … a lot of chefs across the country are starting to do: to show people that you can enjoy the cannabis that you have to take as a medicinal aspect in a way that’s tasty, delicious, and fun. … We are trying to really utilize the plant and the medicinal aspect … and not going in there to just completely get wasted out of our mind.”

Three recently released cookbooks prove to be valuable resources as well: Edibles: Small Bites for the Modern Cannabis Kitchen, by Stephanie Hua with Coreen Carroll (Chronicle Books); The 420 Gourmet: The Elevated Art of Cannabis Cuisine by the mysteriously pseudonymed “JeffThe420Chef” (Harper Wave); and Bong Appétit: Mastering the Art of Cooking with Weed by the editors of Vice’s Munchies website who host a James Beard Award-nominated show, also called “Bong Appétit,” that rivals anything on the Food Network. Each book outlines the uses of cannabis, its therapeutic effects, what to look for in a plant, useful equipment, shopping tips, and how to calculate proper dosages of THC and CBD (more on that in a minute). Instructions for creating your own extracts, infusions, oils, and butters are offered, although you can bypass this step by sourcing these from many of our local dispensaries — Best Daze sells both olive oil and butter, for example, while Kure offers honey and the Oxygen & Healing Bar carries an organic CBD-infused safflower oil.

The photography in each book rivals that of “traditional” cookbooks, and the recipes are creative and enticing. Sure, these pages contain recipes for seemingly typical stoner food — nachos, potato skins, queso and guac, spring rolls, mac and cheese, garlic knots, and French bread pizza. But The 420 Gourmet and Bong Appétit aim to live up to their higher-falutin names, with dishes that are surprisingly refined — crab gratin, risotto, rib-eye, stroganoff, pappardelle Bolognese, holiday ham, and a variant on a classic croquembouche — along with those that highlight nutrition — such as kale, broccoli, and quinoa salads; a veggie burger; and the vibrantly hued “BLAT” salad, which combines bacon, lettuce, avocado, and tomato. Edibles is true to its subtitle, offering recipes for mostly smaller dishes designed for quick bites or finger-food entertaining — sliders, gougères, tea sandwiches, crostini, cookies, and yes, brownies. “Wake and bake” takes on all new meaning thanks to the slew of breakfast recipes in The 420 Gourmet. Bong Appétit also includes recipes for cocktails, although those come with a caveat: “No booze for beginners. … That’s some expert-level stuff.”

Now about that dosing: It’s critical — although as Bong Appétit reminds us, “It’s basically impossible to eat so much THC that you die. Although THC is much safer than alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine, it can definitely make your heart race … so go slowly and learn your limits.” The folks at Best Daze advise that you “know your dosing and have a sense of the potency of your end oil. Edibles are wonderful if you get what you expected from the experience.” Kure’s Ingersoll concurs: “We encourage all of our patients to start slow and go from there. Building up to the desired dose is highly recommended.”

All three cookbooks provide instructions for making infusions and calculating proper dosages, practically insisting that you double-check your math (yes, dude, math is involved). The 420 Gourmet offers handy charts, and Bong Appétit suggests rounding up when estimating THC content: “The difference between a very pleasant edibles experience and a very unpleasant one” — we’re looking at you, Maureen Dowd — “can hinge on consuming just 10 milligrams more THC than planned for, so why not err on the side of caution?” Just in case, though, the book provides some handy suggestions for what to do if you happen to consume too much THC.

But there’s one thing you may still be wondering: What happens if you make, say, medicated French bread pizza, get the munchies, and just want to eat more of that French bread pizza? Keeping in mind Bong Appétit’s sage advice that “You can always eat more; you can never eat less,” Best Daze’s Goldman provides a helpful suggestion: “Any time you make a round of edibles at home, make a non-medicated batch as well; eat a little of one and a lot of the other and enjoy.”

If the coming new year and its closely affiliated post-holiday weight-loss resolutions have you concerned about edible experiments (not to mention those munchies), don’t fret. “Studies show people who use cannabis are not obese as a population,” Goldman says. ◀

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It’s a weederful life: Cooking with cannabis | Restaurants | santafenewmexican.com – Santa Fe New Mexican

Toto, we’re not in pot brownie territory anymore.

The use of medical and recreational marijuana is on the rise across the country. This year Michigan became the 10th state to legalize recreational weed, and 33 states, including New Mexico, license marijuana for medicinal purposes. It’s commonly used to treat pain, insomnia, anxiety, depression, and even epilepsy, though its effect on these and other maladies continues to be studied. In New Mexico, to consume marijuana, you must apply to the state Department of Health’s Medical Cannabis Program, which includes the completion by a health care provider of a medical certification form. The approval process can take up to 30 days.

Though smoking has long been the preferred method of consumption, edibles — foods cooked, infused, marinated, dressed, sauced, or garnished with marijuana or a derivative thereof — are becoming an increasingly popular way to reap the benefits of pot. As with smokable marijuana, edibles contain cannabinoids: both the well-known tetrahydrocannabinol (THC),  marijuana’s main psychoactive compound, and the increasingly popular cannabidiol (CBD), a cannabis derivative that is non-psychotropic: While it won’t get you stoned, it has been shown to have the same benefits. Edibles offer a form of cannabis consumption that is more versatile and discreet than smoking, and their effects can be more potent and long-lasting because the cannabinoids are digested and absorbed through the liver (whereas with smoking, they are inhaled through the lungs and bypass the liver).

Forward-thinking food professionals started jumping on the bandwagon years ago: In 2015, for example, James Beard Award-winning pastry chef and cookbook author Mindy Segal launched a line of “medicated” sweets. Jump to 2017, when according to a report by Arcview Market Research and BDS Analytics, people in Canada and the United States spent more than $1 billion on edibles. That number is projected to grow beyond $4 billion in the next four years. Californians alone will spend roughly $1.3 billion on edibles by 2022.

Dispensaries across Santa Fe sell a wide variety of weed-based victuals. The team at Best Daze (4641 Airport Road, 505-585-4937) — led by COO Eli Goodman and, in the kitchen, Ryan Lampro (of ChocolateSmith and Whoo’s Donuts fame) — creates a staggering roster of goodies, from chocolates and very-popular gummies to cakes, cookies, tarts, crackers, and donuts with infused fillings. Founded by native Santa Fean Minka Ingersoll and chef/nutritionist Fred Lucas, Kure Cannabis (220 N. Guadalupe St.,505-930-5339) sells truffles, cookies, and candies. Their two in-house cooks dream up fantastic special and custom treats, including cakes, tarts, cupcakes, and stunners like the Chocolate Crunch Nugget, filled with sunflower seeds, almonds, and Rice Krispies and topped with cranberries. The Santa Fe Oxygen & Healing Bar – Apothecary (133 W. San Francisco St., 505-986-5037) sells CBD-based gummies, candies, and protein bars, among other products; and their restaurant regularly features a CBD cookie sandwich as well as CBD-infused chile-cheese roasted potatoes and yucca (essentially souped-up chile cheese fries, no?) available with regular or vegan cheese. They also offer the option of adding CBD oil to any other dish on the menu.

Turns out pretty much any food you might decide to cook at home can be transformed into a “medible” with relative ease, and the resources for cooking with cannabis continue to grow as legalization spreads. Intrepid cooks interested in solo experimentation can turn to any of several major cannabis-related publications, including the great-grandfather of the genre, High Times, as well as Dope and the recently launched Kitchen Toke. In addition to triumphant tales of the benefits of cannabis, that magazine and its website offer tips and tasty recipes (in both written and video form) for everything from canna-butter to lime-curry chickpea salad and a cranberry-thyme mimosa sweetened with CBD honey. In one video, Derek Simcik, executive chef of the Thompson Hotel in Seattle, clarifies some of the issues surrounding cooking with cannabis: “You can actually use cannabis like you would wine, as a pairing,” he says, “taking two completely different flavors and helping each other better themselves. This is something that … a lot of chefs across the country are starting to do: to show people that you can enjoy the cannabis that you have to take as a medicinal aspect in a way that’s tasty, delicious, and fun. … We are trying to really utilize the plant and the medicinal aspect … and not going in there to just completely get wasted out of our mind.”

Three recently released cookbooks prove to be valuable resources as well: Edibles: Small Bites for the Modern Cannabis Kitchen, by Stephanie Hua with Coreen Carroll (Chronicle Books); The 420 Gourmet: The Elevated Art of Cannabis Cuisine by the mysteriously pseudonymed “JeffThe420Chef” (Harper Wave); and Bong Appétit: Mastering the Art of Cooking with Weed by the editors of Vice’s Munchies website who host a James Beard Award-nominated show, also called “Bong Appétit,” that rivals anything on the Food Network. Each book outlines the uses of cannabis, its therapeutic effects, what to look for in a plant, useful equipment, shopping tips, and how to calculate proper dosages of THC and CBD (more on that in a minute). Instructions for creating your own extracts, infusions, oils, and butters are offered, although you can bypass this step by sourcing these from many of our local dispensaries — Best Daze sells both olive oil and butter, for example, while Kure offers honey and the Oxygen & Healing Bar carries an organic CBD-infused safflower oil.

The photography in each book rivals that of “traditional” cookbooks, and the recipes are creative and enticing. Sure, these pages contain recipes for seemingly typical stoner food — nachos, potato skins, queso and guac, spring rolls, mac and cheese, garlic knots, and French bread pizza. But The 420 Gourmet and Bong Appétit aim to live up to their higher-falutin names, with dishes that are surprisingly refined — crab gratin, risotto, rib-eye, stroganoff, pappardelle Bolognese, holiday ham, and a variant on a classic croquembouche — along with those that highlight nutrition — such as kale, broccoli, and quinoa salads; a veggie burger; and the vibrantly hued “BLAT” salad, which combines bacon, lettuce, avocado, and tomato. Edibles is true to its subtitle, offering recipes for mostly smaller dishes designed for quick bites or finger-food entertaining — sliders, gougères, tea sandwiches, crostini, cookies, and yes, brownies. “Wake and bake” takes on all new meaning thanks to the slew of breakfast recipes in The 420 Gourmet. Bong Appétit also includes recipes for cocktails, although those come with a caveat: “No booze for beginners. … That’s some expert-level stuff.”

Now about that dosing: It’s critical — although as Bong Appétit reminds us, “It’s basically impossible to eat so much THC that you die. Although THC is much safer than alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine, it can definitely make your heart race … so go slowly and learn your limits.” The folks at Best Daze advise that you “know your dosing and have a sense of the potency of your end oil. Edibles are wonderful if you get what you expected from the experience.” Kure’s Ingersoll concurs: “We encourage all of our patients to start slow and go from there. Building up to the desired dose is highly recommended.”

All three cookbooks provide instructions for making infusions and calculating proper dosages, practically insisting that you double-check your math (yes, dude, math is involved). The 420 Gourmet offers handy charts, and Bong Appétit suggests rounding up when estimating THC content: “The difference between a very pleasant edibles experience and a very unpleasant one” — we’re looking at you, Maureen Dowd — “can hinge on consuming just 10 milligrams more THC than planned for, so why not err on the side of caution?” Just in case, though, the book provides some handy suggestions for what to do if you happen to consume too much THC.

But there’s one thing you may still be wondering: What happens if you make, say, medicated French bread pizza, get the munchies, and just want to eat more of that French bread pizza? Keeping in mind Bong Appétit’s sage advice that “You can always eat more; you can never eat less,” Best Daze’s Goldman provides a helpful suggestion: “Any time you make a round of edibles at home, make a non-medicated batch as well; eat a little of one and a lot of the other and enjoy.”

If the coming new year and its closely affiliated post-holiday weight-loss resolutions have you concerned about edible experiments (not to mention those munchies), don’t fret. “Studies show people who use cannabis are not obese as a population,” Goldman says. ◀

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Ranch Costs plants seeds for lawful marijuana settlements – American Lender

Hostilities towards the lawful UNITED STATE marijuana sector are softening substantially, with indicators of additional getting rid of money and also electronic workarounds from a market that has actually long been rejected by standard repayment cards.The newest

increase originates from a farming regulation, typically called the 2018 Ranch Expense, which Head of state Trump authorized right into legislation on Thursday. The legislation legislates hemp, substantially increasing its prospective usages. While it did not influence the government restriction on cannabis, which is still on the listing offorbidden narcotics, the legislation is still a welcome indicator for farming financial institutions, which had actually watched out for moneying hemp farming.This ought to have a downstream influence on marijuana repayments, where

an incipient market is constructing for shopping and also debit cards. “De-scheduling hemp will certainly motivate banks to start using systems for non-cash settlements in the marijuana market,” stated Tom Zuber, a companion at Zuber Lawler & Del Duca, a Chicago-based law practice.” The intro of non-cash repayment services will certainly consequently assistance to sustain the ongoing growth of the international marijuana market. These are really interesting times.” The ranch act isn’t the only

favorable political wind. Political leaders from both events are sustaining a”secure harbor “for banks in lawful marijuana states. Leisure cannabis is lawful in 10 states as well as clinical cannabis is lawful in 33.

The having fun area for marijuana settlements is still not limitless, yet it’s expanding rapidly. Michigan, Utah as well as Missouri legislated marijuana sales in the autumn political election, as well as Jeff Procedure– a long time challenger of legislating cannabis– surrendered as attorney general of the United States soon after.Sessions was viewed as a marijuana tough lining with a more stringent position than also Head of state Trump. His separation had a practically prompt influence on the marijuana market. Various other advancements consist of previous Home Audio speaker John Boehner signing up with the board of a dispensary, as well as the significant UNITED STATE card networks joining Canada’s entertainment marijuana market.”Financial as well as financial solutions are mosting likely to end up being extra offered to those CBD organizations covered under the Ranch Costs,”claimed Dustin Eide, Chief Executive Officer of CanPay, including his firm is currently able to help hemp-derived CBD services in getting to route seller accounts. CDB, of Cannabidiol, is a marijuana substance that has clinical advantages however does not make customers really feel”stoned.”CanPay supplies a closed-loop debit repayment system for marijuana. It just recently partnered with Jane Technologies, which runs an on-line marijuana industry, to develop a marijuana ecommerce solution the assistances order-ahead, in-store pick-up and also delivery.That’s a significant advancement from marijuana repayments’past, which was controlled by various other workarounds and also cash-only settlements to card settlements.”Non-cash repayments profit everybody, therefore it merely requires to be pressed onward; nobody is truly pressing back any longer,”claimed David Ehrlich, COO of Zodaka, an electronic settlements business. The pattern is additionally international. Along with Canada, several of the fastest expanding lawful marijuana markets are outside the UNITED STATE, sustaining a prospective worldwide repayments market as well as causing a considerable spike in international earnings in the years ahead.In enhancement to settlements, this will certainly affect vendor tasks that

are typically connected to settlements, such as advertising and marketing, CRM and also analytics. This can assist dispensaries as well as various other firms get to the best target market, as well as additionally alleviate danger by making sure age restrictions are

stuck to, claimed Josh Segal, Chief Executive Officer of AdLoop, an electronic marketing firm.”The marketers will certainly have the ability to see specifically where their advertisement invest goes, permitting them to focus as well as concentrate on conversions,”Segal claimed.”These brand-new marketing modern technologies will certainly not just permit marijuana services the capacity to market, however eventually bring even more cash right into the marijuana sector.”

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Marijuana-Infused Cooking Oil and Weed Butter Disappearing From Dispensaries | Westword – Westword

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The Emergence of Cannabis Cooking Shows Challenges Stigmas Against Pot – LIVEKINDLY

Once considered a gateway to drug abuse, recreational and medicinal cannabis use is becoming increasingly accepted by the U.S. public as more states move to legalize it. With a more mainstream acceptance comes a shift in how pot is handled in popular culture, leading now to the rise of cannabis cooking shows.

Rolling Stone reports that Viceland’s “Bong Appétit” is by far the most successful of the new subgenre of show. The first two seasons of the series feature host Abdullah Saeed, who throws elaborate, multi-course cananbis-infused dinner parties prepared by chefs. While the show itself is not vegan, the May 2017 episode “Cruelty-Free Cannabis Cuisine” featured plant-based chef and cookbook author Bryant Terry, who cooked a THC-infused meatless meal.

The show takes an educational approach to cooking with weed, such as the science behind infusing fats and oils. During the show, the chefs also have to be able to hold their own despite eating edibles, known for being deceptively powerful, even for regular consumers.

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The critically-acclaimed show won the prestigious James Beard Award for Television Program, In Studio or Fixed Location, last year. It also led to the release of the cookbook “Bong Appétit: Mastering the Art of Cooking with Weed,” which features recipes as well as a comprehensive guide to the ins-and-outs of “high”-end cooking, last October.

Following the success of “Bong Appétit,” Netflix launched its own elevated cooking series this summer called “Cooking on High,” which takes a classic competition show approach. Two chefs are pitted against each other in a battle-of-the-best-edibles. The series has not received the same praise as Viceland’s “Bong Appétit,” but the subgenre is still relatively new.

So far, there has been one vegan cannabis cooking show: last year’s award-winning “High Cuisine,” which was featured on Verizon’s go90 network. Filmed at LA’s Pollution Studios, the 12-episode series pitted high chefs against one another in a cooking competition. The show was co-hosted by studio CEO and Switch4Good co-founder, Asher Brown, and “Last Comedian Standing” winner Josh Blue.

California-based cannabis lifestyle media brand PRØHBTD created “Pot Pie,” a series hosted by Brandin LaShea where participants smoke, then try their best not to get too distracted while cooking. Last September, the company announced “High Cuisine,” a 10-episode travel docuseries that have no relation to the Pollution Studio show. The series was created in a joint effort with production and distribution company Rooftop Films and the Amsterdam-based Totem Media.

The new “High Cuisine” follows chefs Noah Tucker and Anthony Joseph as they travel the world, partaking in mind-altering herbs and plants in locations including Amsterdam, South Africa, and Indonesia.

“High Cuisine puts a press on what is taboo and what is the line between what is comfortable, like food, and what maybe isn’t comfortable, like the drugs different cultures experiment with. People have always been interested in food and drugs, but no one has ever really put them together in the way that we’re doing it,” said Tucker in a statement.

With legalization being a tricky area, weed cooking shows have yet to be embraced by a larger network, but platforms like Viceland, Netflix, and PRØHBTD are willing to take the chance. While the shows have silly moments fueled by bud, the increased presence of weed-centered media is helping to normalize cannabis consumption.

While not legal on a federal level, more states are moving to make both recreational and medicinal cannabis lawful. Michiganders voted to legalize it earlier this month and will have access to recreational pot on December 6. Many speculate that New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut will be the next to pass legislation.


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Image Source: High Cuisine