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12 Best Seed Banks That Ship to USA: Where to Buy Cannabis Seeds Online – Peninsula Daily News

Growing your own cannabis plants is a fun and practical experience you ought to try at least once. You may discover that you like it…and that it saves a lot of money on buying cannabis seeds online the usual way.

But if you’re not sure how to go about ordering seeds and haven’t the foggiest notion of how to avoid trouble with shipping and payment, you’ve come to the right place.

In this discussion, we’re going to discuss the 12 best seed banks that ship to the United States. Then, we’ll cover some commonly asked questions and tips for newcomers that will help you achieve your destiny as the greatest midnight toker ever. Or something like that…here we go.

Best Seed Banks of 2021

  1. All-round best US seed bank – ILGM
  2. Best variety of strains – Seedsman
  3. Best Canadian seed bank – Crop King Seeds
  4. Best marijuana seed site in Europe – MSNL
  5. Best new weed seed bank – Gorilla Seed Bank
  6. Best hard to find online cannabis seeds – Seed City
  7. Best marijuana seeds guarantee – Herbies Seeds
  8. Fast same day shipping – Quebec Cannabis Seeds
  9. Most reputable marijuana seed bank – Rocket Seeds
  10. Best stealth shipping for cannabis seeds – MJ Seeds Canada
  11. Best free shipping offer – Grower’s Choice
  12. Best price match for cannabis seeds – Attitude Seeds

1. ILGM – All-Round Best Seed Bank That Ships to USA

ILGM

ILGM

Pros

  • Guaranteed shipping
  • Guaranteed germination
  • Quality marijuana seeds
  • Founded in 2012 by a growing expert

Cons

  • Not as many hard-to-find seeds as competitors

ILGM, or I Love Growing Marijuana, is a newbie’s favorite – and frankly, with seasonal discounts like Buy 10 and Get 10 Free Seeds, they’re a favorite shop for newcomers who are starting their first growing project.

The company sells feminized and auto-flower seeds, which have the highest rate of success, even if you’re not an expert grower. ILGM offers best-sellers of high THC strains or high CBD strains, seeds for beginners, grow kits, MJ fertilizer, and seed variety packs.

Experienced growers like it too, for its perks of free shipping to US states, guaranteed delivery, and guaranteed germination.

It’s the kind of TLC that makes everyone want to grow their own plants.

2. Seedsman – Best Seed Bank Variety

seedsman

seedsman

Pros

  • Founded in 2003
  • 1,500+ strains from 65 seed banks
  • Various payment options
  • Generous loyalty program

Cons

  • No guaranteed products

Seedsman is one of the longest-lasting seed banks in the business that ship to the US. And surprisingly, still one of the best-reviewed – even by the likes of picky Reddit users. The company sells its own brand of cannabis seeds but also carries over 1,500 cannabis strains from 65 different seed banks across the world.

That’s what we call a huge selection! The company also offers express delivery and discreet packaging for buyers who may be inexperienced with ordering cannabis products through the mail. Even cooler by us is the fact that Seedsman uses its profits to campaign for marijuana reform, and gets involved politically and at a number of tradeshows and charities.

There’s plenty to like here, but Seedsman wins the category for an extensive selection.

3. Crop King Seeds – Best Canadian Seed Bank

crop king seeds

crop king seeds

Pros

  • Founded in 2005
  • Toll-free customer support
  • 80 percent germination rate
  • Higher than average quality seeds

Cons

  • No guarantee
  • Higher price

Crop King Seeds offers seeds for beginners and experienced growers, from auto-flowering to feminized, as well as fast growers, regular, and CBD variety. You can also buy mix and match or go for the top-sellers in the country. Crop Kings gets bonus points for its 80 percent germination success rate, as well as discreet packaging and free shipping over $200.

It’s convenient to buy, too, with options ranging from Paypal to Bitcoin and even Venmo. Most buyers say that while the cannabis seeds are slightly above market price, the high germination rate makes it worthwhile. All seeds are inspected and tested before being sent.

The Canadian-based cannabis seed bank company even has 200 physical stores in Canada, making it a successful enterprise you can count on, and one fully protected from USA laws, despite easy shipping to and from your home state.

4. MSNL – Best European Based Seek Bank

msnl

msnl

Pros

  • Founded in 1999
  • Limited free shipping offers
  • Quality seeds and genetics testing
  • Big sales on individuals seeds

Cons

  • Location may slow down US orders

With promises of 40 percent off for special sales, it’s hard not to like MSNL, or Marijuana Seeds, NL, based in the Netherlands. Despite its faraway headquarters, the seed bank company ships to the U.S. and has been doing so since 1999. The designation as the “original seed bank” has earned the company a reputation for efficient shipping and fine seed genetics.

MSNL offers discreet shipping, free seeds with every order, and even a limited free delivery. Buyers must order over a certain amount to get free shipping (between £55 and 250 £) but must pay extra for stealth shipping and guaranteed shipping if they’re not ordering in bulk. MSNL is one of the most experienced and reliable seed bank companies to work with.

5. Gorilla Seed Bank – Best New Online Seed Bank

Pros

  • Dedicated US telephone line
  • Free shipping over 99 pounds
  • 100 percent feminized seeds

Cons

  • A bit of a wait for US residents
  • Limited refunds provided (needs undamaged seed and original packaging)

Gorilla Seed Bank has a catchy theme for sure, and it’s a new seed bank company compared to our other candidates. However, GSB also comes with experienced leaders with decades of cannabis seed experience, and best of all, free shipping on orders over 99 GBP.

It’s also nice that the company includes free cannabis seeds with many purchases – although you do have to spend a bit. There is also an option for discreet and guaranteed delivery. You can order feminized, auto-flowering, CBD, high THC strain, medical, newbie grows, and best-selling strains. Gorilla is a company to keep your eye on.

6. Seed City – Best for Hard to Find Cannabis Strains

Pros

  • Price match guarantee
  • Discreet shipping option
  • Founded 2010
  • Pretty good seasonal deals

Cons

  • Email support only
  • No guarantee on discreet packaging

Seed City is all about the green, judging from its very green website, but not “green” in the sense of a new company. The company actually dates back to 2010, which is a fairly reliable profile. The company takes pride in shipping seeds from the best breeders worldwide to individual growers, still wrapped in the original packaging.

With sales from 20 to 30 percent off the retail price, and a promise to find rare cannabis seeds, Seed City is an option to consider. Though the company says it sells for “collectible and souvenir” purposes only, they thankfully offer a stealth shipping option. Buyers can also get discreet shipping (no signing, non-tracked) or a guaranteed shipment on “signed for deliveries.”

That means you have to choose “guaranteed” or “discreet,” which actually makes a lot of sense. Best of all is the company’s price match guarantee, meaning Seed City is putting their promise of low prices to the test.

7. Herbies Seeds – Best Marijuana Strains Guarantee

Pros

  • Discounts and free gifts!
  • Personal satisfaction guarantee
  • Telephone customer service
  • Quality control ensures excellent seeds
  • Germination guarantee

Cons

  • No free shipping to the US
  • Signature required (not very discreet)

Herbies Seeds may look like a simple store, but it’s got a great pitch: free gifts every time you purchase cannabis seeds, as well as bonus seeds for every 20 Euros spent. They also offer a sliding scale discount of 5, 10, or 15 percent off depending on how much you spend – 100, 200, or 400 EUR.

But the best feature of Herbies Seeds is the guarantee of personal satisfaction that it offers its customers. They promise to send only fresh (temperature controlled), inspected seeds with guaranteed germination, protective packaging, and safe stealth delivery. If there’s a problem you contact the company, follow the procedure, and they’ll send another shipment out.

It’s a nice touch, which may justify buying from so far away.

8. Quebec Cannabis Seeds – Fast Same Day Shipping

Pros

  • Around since 2013
  • Hearty plants and easy-to-grow seeds
  • Telephone and live chat
  • Ships to US within two weeks

Cons

  • Limited payment options
  • No refunds on seized US packages

Quebec Cannabis Seeds ships to the USA, and all over the world, focusing on auto-flower, feminized, and CBD/THC seeds. They offer rare phenotypes as well as seeds that are going to offer a much bigger yield than average. They also offer high-quality seeds that can thrive even in colder or warmer temperatures.

Even better are some of the sweet deals: free shipping over $200, free cannabis seeds when ordering over $150, and always shipment within 24 hours. With a germination guarantee, they’re the safest neighbor to the US when ordering your next round.

9. Rocket Seeds – Most Reputable Online Seed Banks Company

Pros

  • Privacy and security guaranteed
  • Fast shipping worldwide
  • Stealth shipping
  • Replacement guarantee
  • Germination guarantee (IF you follow their growing instructions)

Cons

  • Misleading worldwide shipping claim
  • Long wait times

When it comes to combo packs and discounts like 10 free sees with your purchase, Rocket Seeds is hard to beat, though a few entrees on our list matched their promises.

But Rocket Seeds has a reputation for quality and has an impressive catalog of 500 new strains to choose from. Rocket Seeds also promises fast shipping, stealth shipping and works with a variety of other growers to get those hard-to-find cannabis seeds.

10. MJ Seeds Canada – Best Stealth Shipping for Weed Seeds

mary

mary

Pros

  • Founded in 2009
  • Telephone customer support
  • Stealth shipping guarantee

Cons

  • No germination guarantee

MJ Seeds Canada offers high-quality cannabis seeds as well as 100 percent secure and private shipping.

The shipping guarantee (available only for premium shipping with tracking and insurance) covers the rare event of confiscation but requires photo proof of the undeliverable package. If you’re nervous about your package getting seized, MJ Seeds can offer you a comforting hand and replacement seeds when you need them.

11. Grower’s Choice – Best Free Shipping Offer from a Marijuana Seed Bank

Pros

  • Telephone customer support
  • Guaranteed germination
  • Loyalty program for returning buyers

Cons

  • No free shipping
  • Long delivery times

Grower’s Choice offers the standard deal, including a 90 percent germination guarantee (with replacement seeds), free seeds with purchases, and discreet delivery in the U.S. However, its location in Spain makes it a fairly long wait, even though you can speak to the marketing headquarters in California.

Still, Grower’s Choice makes a good pitch, especially with its plethora of growing knowledge shared on the website and its confidence in standing by its product.

12. Attitude Seeds – Best Price Match for Quality Cannabis Seeds

Pros

  • Price match policy
  • Guaranteed shipping
  • Free seeds
  • Variety of purchasing options

Cons

  • Not all credit cards are accepted
  • No refunds (unless seeds are unopened)
  • Cannot discuss germination, yields, or THC levels

Attitude Seed advertises itself as the largest online cannabis store, and it is a nice play to mix and match seeds, buy popular brands, and get some handy deals like “UFO discounts,” meaning you get loads of free cannabis seeds if you spend a moderate amount of change.

The price match policy is certainly a nice feature, but Attitude also has some disadvantages, in terms of very limited refunds, limited payment options, and an unwillingness to discuss details about germination and seed genetics. Though in their defense, it is illegal to discuss such things in the U.K.

Who Are We?

We are a team of marijuana/CBD/delta8 researchers who also know a thing or two about growing outdoor marijuana in Oregon, the U.S. Utopia of cannabis!

In order to create the most comprehensive list of marijuana seed banks, we ordered cannabis seeds online from each reviewed company just so we could compare price, shipping, and the overall quality of seeds, at least as far as first impressions go.

Buying Cannabis Seeds: Guide

Gender

Many new growers choose to buy cannabis seeds according to a preferred gender. Regular seeds contain both male and female variations and are used by experienced breeders for long-term crops, or even hydroponic plants, which grow without soil.

However, new users might have problems growing regular seeds and may opt for feminized seeds instead, which are easier to germinate and produce crowd-pleasing buds. Feminized seeds are the product of two female cannabis plants.

Genetics

Experienced buyers also pay attention to genetics when buying seeds.

Sativa seeds come from a warmer climate and tend to grow large when nourished well. These seeds also produce high THC plants. Alternatively, Indica seeds tend to be shorter but with thicker leaves and stockier stems. These also have high THC or CBD levels.

You might see auto-flowering seeds referred to often because they are non-photoperiod plants, meaning they will grow even with very little light. Hybrid seeds are a cross between Indica and Sativa and may be preferred for their unique effects that come from mixing strains.

Quality

Besides strain variety, pay attention to seed quality. High quality seeds are made by seed bank companies that either work with trusted breeders and have a very efficient production process for growing plants in ideal conditions.

Space

It’s also important to consider your available space, whether inside or out, as well as legal limitations on quantity or variety. Some regular seeds grow very well outdoors but can grow over 15 feet, which would create a problem for anyone who’s not an experienced grower with their own land.

Naturally, feminized plants are typically the choice of the beginner who doesn’t have a lot of space or freedom to grow whatever they want.

Soil

Lastly, check for soil variations, as not all strains grow alike and certainly not under standardized conditions.

Seed Banks Guide and FAQs

Is Buying Marijuana Seeds Legal?

Technically it depends on the state and city you’re in. But for the more part, either cannabis is completely legal (but with limitations), or pot plants and marijuana are illegal, but not much can be done about the little seeds themselves.

The seeds could be collectibles, or for research purposes, or for any other silly excuse, and you probably won’t be arrested for it.

As far as the USPS goes, first-class packaging is protected by the Fourth Amendment, at least to an extent. According to the USPS website, in order for postal inspectors to open first-class mail, they would first need a warrant issued by a judge. Unlikely to happen over some seeds.

But any other class of mail is not guaranteed and can be opened without a warrant, so expect to pay for first-class shipping when ordering from reputable companies.

How Do Seed Banks Ship Marijuana Seeds?

Because cannabis is not legal in all 50 states, shipping laws, as well as legality status, can vary. However, most cannabis seed banks will ship to the USA, claiming that their seeds are for research or collectible purposes only.

Remember that some seed banks are diligent in researching your location, but others are not and will not be responsible for any legal ramifications.

The good news is that most companies will not prohibit sales to your state and will ship you legal “dormant” seeds in a discreet way. The option is called Stealth Shipping. The seeds will usually be disguised, like attached to a conspicuous gift.

The basic legality of dormant seeds does not, however, ensure delivery. Some packages will be confiscated, especially if Customs suspects you’re going to buy marijuana seeds online. However, it’s unlikely you’ll face any charges. Usually, your package is just taken, and it’s your loss to suffer.

What Happens if the Weed Seeds Get Confiscated?

Some companies like ILGM and MJ Seeds Canada will replace the seeds at no extra cost, even if customs confiscate them. However, other companies will not, and they expect you to read the fine print before calling customer support and complaining about policies they cannot change.

Some online seed banks will also require proof, such as photos or tracking numbers. Check each company’s stealth shipping page for more details.

How Do I Pay Seed Banks?

Depending on the company, you may be offered a host of payment options, from credit cards (the preferred method) or cryptocurrency, which is also preferred and sometimes comes with a discount on prices. A few companies will work with checks, or e-checks, or even Paypal.

How Do Charges Show Up for Cannabis Seed Banks?

Part of stealth shipping is avoiding any suspicious charges on your bank or credit card statement. Practically all the companies listed will not charge your card with their brand name or make any allusions regarding the contents of the package.

Buying Cannabis Seeds Online: The Takeaway

In closing, if you’re going into the cannabis business or have a need for more control over your favorite product’s yield, you might consider starting your own small operation.

ILGM impressed us this time around for their strong guarantees and the highest quality of seeds overall, even when compared to some world-class competition. And yes, it helped tremendously that they’re based in California and understand the complexity of US cannabis laws.

Our research found that ILGM is among the top reputable seed banks available that stand by their product by offering guaranteed germination and shipping across the United States.

You don’t have much to lose when you work through I Love Growing Marijuana or any of our personal recommendations. You can follow local laws and stay safe, all the while growing your own product and overseeing the process. Become a cannabis connoisseur in 2021!

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CBD for COPD: Does It Work? – Healthline

If you live with COPD, you may have already heard some of the claims about treating the condition with CBD.

Also known as cannabidiol, CBD is an organic compound found in the cannabis plant. It contains some of the medicinal compounds of cannabis, but without the psychoactive component that causes you to feel “stoned” or high.

In some early trials done on animals, CBD has been shown to be somewhat promising to treat some symptoms of COPD, such as airway inflammation and coughing.

It’s not completely understood how well COPD might (or might not) work for treating COPD. Let’s take a look at what the research says about how effective CBD might be for treating COPD.

Those who claim that CBD is an effective treatment for COPD tend to believe that CBD can open up your bronchial passages, helping you to breathe easier.

And there’s reason to believe that this is true. Studies from over 40 years ago strongly suggested that smoking marijuana dilated the lungs, helping make breathing easier for some people with asthma.

But what we don’t know still far outweighs what we do know. A small 2018 randomized controlled trial of 18 participants with advanced COPD didn’t indicate that using mainly vaporized THC made any meaningful difference in endurance or breathlessness during exercise as a result of airway dilation.

In an even smaller 2011 study, participants were given either cannabidiol and THC oil or a placebo to see if it helped with the symptom of breathlessness. It didn’t appear to.

But participants who were given the CBD/THC combination were less likely to feel “air hunger,” or have complaints of not being able to breathe, in follow-up observations.

There are also some animal trials worth considering. In a 2014 animal study, mice with acute lung injuries experienced reduced inflammation and improved lung function. But this doesn’t tell us much about whether CBD is an effective, long-term treatment for the symptoms of COPD in humans.

THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) is the extract of the cannabis plant that contains psychoactive properties.

While CBD products are typically used to relieve pain and can’t produce the feeling of being “high,” THC can produce that feeling. And while CBD is often used as a therapeutic and is widely considered safe for ongoing use for most people, THC usage is not as widespread or accepted.

As mentioned above, THC has been used in at least one study of how CBD affects lung function for people with COPD. But THC also has side effects that CBD does not, such as increased heart rate, memory loss, and anxiety.

Because these THC side effects may be less predictable or harder to control, it’s not typically recommended that you use products containing THC for COPD until further research indicates that it’s effective or safe.

Even though research doesn’t definitively link CBD to any benefits for people with COPD, it may still be safe to incorporate CBD into your lifestyle, especially for other symptoms.

Here are some different options for taking CBD. However, take note that not all of them are safe for use with COPD.

CBD oil

CBD oil is one of the most popular ways that people take CBD to treat their COPD.

You can diffuse CBD oil through a diffuser in your home, which has minimal side effects. But it can be hard to control the dosage.

Some people also apply CBD oil topically to the neck and chest as a way of soothing COPD symptoms. The only current evidence that this works is purely anecdotal.

You may also inhale CBD oil through a vape pen or other vaping device. This can produce a feeling of relaxation while delivering CBD directly into your bloodstream and your lungs.

Keep in mind that vaping itself does have side effects. Vaping can also cause lung irritation and inflammation due to the inhalation of hot vapor that may contain other potentially harmful substances. Vaping CBD oil might not necessarily have benefits that outweigh the possible harm, especially if you have COPD.

Look for products that have a certificate of authenticity so you know that you’re getting a clean product, and avoid vapes that have any additives.

Edibles

You may also consume CBD through gummies, food products, or food-grade CBD oil.

Consuming CBD means that it can take some time for the effects of the CBD to actually kick in. It can also take a while for you to figure out how much CBD you need to consume in order to feel the effects and manage COPD symptoms.

Once again, any evidence that you can consume any kind of CBD product for COPD is purely anecdotal.

Smoking

Some people smoke cannabis as a way of accessing the benefits of CBD and THC.

It’s possible that this does relieve some symptoms of COPD for some people in some cases. But smoking cannabis can also inflame and irritate your lungs.

A small 2016 research review showed that smoking cannabis caused an increase in lung symptoms in 8 out of 9 studies, which can sometimes worsen COPD symptoms or your long-term outlook.

Talk with a doctor before considering using CBD to treat COPD.

Your doctor may be able to tell you whether CBD is safe for you to use, especially if you have any other conditions or symptoms that CBD might worsen.

Your doctor may also be able to help you get a medical marijuana card. In some states, this allows you purchase CBD products for medical use at a lower price and from a wider selection of shops.

Next, you may first want to look into your current state laws about CBD use. Some states require the use of a medical marijuana card for people who use CBD, with no option to purchase CBD legally for recreational use.

To buy CBD legally (and safely), keep these tips in mind:

  • You’ll need to verify your age. Most retailers, whether brick-and-mortar or online, will also ask for age verification. In most states where CBD is legal, you’ll need to be 18, but in others, you may need to be 21.
  • Verify that the products you are using have been vetted and are safe to consume. CBD products being sold in grocery stores or chain retail settings may make unsubstantiated claims about their efficacy, but contain only trace amounts of CBD (or none at all). Research the products that you are considering and look into third-party studies that prove out their claims.
  • Find manufacturers, sellers, or retailers you can trust. Don’t try CBD products on a whim without researching them first. Many trustworthy and well-regulated manufacturers make a wide range of products, so find a credible seller (or a few) and stick with them to avoid exposing yourself to new or untested products.
  • Avoid hempseed oil and Cannabis sativa seed oil, as neither contain active CBD. Look for products that contain the ingredients hemp oil, full-spectrum CBD, or cannabidiol.

There are currently no dosage or usage recommendations for using CBD to treat COPD. That’s because the research is largely preliminary and, in some cases, inconclusive.

If you have COPD, speak with a doctor before you start any treatment regimen and get sound advice about what will work best for you given your symptoms, overall health, and other lifestyle factors.

The use of CBD can cause side effects that can vary according to your method of use. CBD affects everyone differently, so it’s hard to predict exactly what side effects you’ll experience (if any at all).

Common side effects from using CBD in any form may include:

  • fatigue or lethargy
  • changes in your appetite
  • dry mouth
  • diarrhea

If you have COPD and choose to smoke or vape CBD oil, you may notice that your lungs feel raw or swollen. You may feel like your symptoms, such as shortness of breath or chest tightness, feel triggered or aggravated.

It is possible that CBD can be used to treat symptoms of COPD. But most research about its efficacy for COPD is either preliminary or inconclusive.

There are also side effects of using CBD that may outweigh the benefits, especially if you are a person who already has lung inflammation as the result of COPD.

Speak with a doctor about whether or not CBD is a realistic treatment option to manage your COPD symptoms.

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Charlotte’s baked lobsters light scientific flame – Mount Desert Islander

SOUTHWEST HARBOR — Charlotte’s Legendary Lobster Pound lived up to its name when owner Charlotte Gill made international headlines for her attempts to find a more humane way to cook lobsters by exposing them to marijuana smoke. Now, a few years later, there’s some science behind the idea.   

In 2018, Gill, with the help of an air mattress pump, funneled smoke from her homegrown marijuana into a sealed container that held a lobster and equal parts water and air. She would then hotbox the lobster for three and five minutes, fully sedating them so the live cooking process would theoretically be less painful.   

Unlike non-hotboxed lobsters, when they went into the water, Gill said her lobsters would barely move, indicating to her that they weren’t feeling any pain.  

“Our lobsters were completely sedated,” Gill said. “When you lifted them up, they were basically a limp noodle.”   

A team of scientists at the University of California San Diego, building off Gill’s idea, cooked up their own experiment recently, exposing lobsters to vapor from an e-cigarette device for either 30 or 60 minutes.   

They looked to see how much the lobsters moved after they were exposed to THC – the main psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. They also tested for it in the lobsters’ tissues and looked to see if it changed their reaction to temperature.   

The paper, which hasn’t been officially published or peer-reviewed, concluded that lobsters did have THC in their tissue, and they did slow down and move less, supporting Gill’s theory that lobsters could take in and be affected by THC via “atmospheric exposure.”  

But, unlike Gill’s lobsters, the university’s crustaceans still reacted to hot water. Whether their lobsters actually get high and relaxed is up in the air, as well, according to the scientists.   

“Further experimentation would be required to fully investigate other behavioral outcomes, including anxiety-like measures,” the paper concluded.  

One of the scientists in the study did not respond to a request for comment.  

Charlotte Gill, the owner of Charlotte’s Legendary Lobster Pound in Southwest Harbor, poses with a pair of lobsters. One is holding a prop cannabis joint, signifying her past work with marijuana smoke to sedate lobsters, and the other has its claw on a bottle of valerian root, which she currently uses at her restaurant. Scientists in California did an experiment to see if lobsters showed levels of THC after being exposed to cannabis vapor.  
PHOTO COURTESY OF CHARLOTTE GILL

Gill was glad that there was some science backing her idea that lobsters can be affected by THC but said the fact that the scientists’ lobsters still reacted to the hot water didn’t disprove her experiments.  

She was not happy that people were claiming the university “debunked” her theory and she pointed to several major differences between the USDC experiment and hers.   

The university did lower doses for a long time, emitted via e-cigarette vapor. Gill did high doses for short periods from the smoke of a whole bud.   

She compared the low-dose, long-exposure method to giving someone a small amount of Novocain for a root canal.   

“You’ve got a completely different experiment here,” she said.   

Gill’s hotboxed lobsters weren’t sold to the public, but she claimed that the meat was sweeter and softer because the lobsters were less stressed than their non-sedated counterparts.   

Being an animal lover her whole life, she wanted to show people there could be a better way to cook the state’s iconic dish. Gill studied philosophy in college and the seafood business brought a line from Fyodor Dostoevsky’s “The Brothers Karamazov” to mind.   

“Imagine that you are creating a fabric of human destiny with the object of making men happy in the end, giving them peace and rest at last, but that it was essential and inevitable to torture to death only one tiny creature…and to found that edifice on its unavenged tears, would you consent to be the architect on those conditions?” she recited during an interview with the Islander.   

The line has stuck with her for the last 30 years and, with marijuana off the table for customers, she’s moved on to other methods, which have governmental approval, to sedate the lobsters.   

She tried CBD, but that took too long for the effects to take hold and wore off too fast. Valerian root had much better success.   

The root works in only a few seconds and lobsters love the flavor of it, but Gill estimated that it only has about 75 percent the effectiveness of cannabis.  

Gill hoped her work with marijuana lobsters wouldn’t be discredited and discarded by this new research and she wanted to see her methods tested out to find a more humane way to cook lobster.  

“I feel that was crucially important work that we did,” Gill said. “If it can work on a lobster, it can literally work on anything.”  

 

Ethan Genter

Ethan is the maritime reporter for the Ellsworth American and Mount Desert Islander. He also covers Bar Harbor. When he’s not reporting, you’ll likely find him wandering trails while listening to audiobooks. Send tips, story ideas and favorite swimming holes in Hancock County to [email protected]

Ethan Genter

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Cheba Hut Opens Third Fort Collins Location | Westword – Westword

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After two years in the making, Cheba Hut is about to open a new flagship operation in Fort Collins.

On Monday, June 21 the Cheba Hut is opening a “neighborhood hangout for curing cottonmouth and the munchies” in south Fort Collins at 2550 East Harmony Road. The new sub shop will be the marijuana-themed sandwich joint’s sixteenth location in Colorado, and third in Fort Collins.

The new Harmony location will feature a spacious bar, outdoor patio on the front and back end of the space and the shop’s first-ever pickup window — but founder Scott Jennings wants to be clear that the window is for walk-ups only.

“This is not a f*cking drive-through” Jennings says in a press release announcing the new restaurant before taking a more light-hearted tone: “Stay tuned for some old-school parties, free food, and shenanigans.”

What sort of shenanigans? Five of the first fifty people in line at the grand opening will win free Cheba Hut for a year, and all fifty will receive a limited-edition print designed by Joshua Finley, the local artist behind fifteen different Cheba Hut murals, including the new Harmony Road location.

Inside Cheba Hut's new flagship restaurant.

Inside Cheba Hut’s new flagship restaurant.

Courtesy of Cheba Hut

Since Cheba Hut first opened in 1998 in Tempe, Arizona, the franchise has expanded to forty restaurants across the country. With around 700 employees in Colorado and more locations than in any other state, however, Cheba Hut is ready to call Colorado home. The new flagship shop on Harmony Road will also serve as the chain’s new training center and headquarters, according to marketing head Mel Banister.

“We really wanted to take our time on this one and make sure it was the right space, the right size and put in all those details. Since it’s going to be our main training hub and headquarters, we wanted to make sure that it was the right feel and everything we wanted,” he says.

Banister says the front and back patios will have plenty of luscious green trees around for shade as well as a full-service bar to cool down during what’s turning out to be a hot summer. Dogs are welcome at the new location, he adds.

“We’re really excited about this new space. We love our community and especially love Fort Collins and appreciate all of the love that Colorado has always given us,” Banister says.

Keep Westword Free… Since we started Westword, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Denver, and we would like to keep it that way. Offering our readers free access to incisive coverage of local news, food and culture. Producing stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands, with gutsy reporting, stylish writing, and staffers who’ve won everything from the Society of Professional Journalists’ Sigma Delta Chi feature-writing award to the Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism. But with local journalism’s existence under siege and advertising revenue setbacks having a larger impact, it is important now more than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our “I Support” membership program, allowing us to keep covering Denver with no paywalls.

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5 weed products Jesse Royal can’t live without – Weedmaps News

Jesse Royal is a force to be reckoned with in the world of reggae music. Royal is a singer, songwriter, and performer whose 2017 debut album Lily of da Valley topped the Billboard Reggae Album charts and brought him international acclaim. Born and raised in Jamaica, Royal’s love for the genre has been deeply ingrained in him since childhood. As he puts it, “Reggae music, I think, is just a natural expression for us as Jamaicans … we walk Jamaican, we talk Jamaican, we live Jamaican, so the music that we express, whatever tempo, whatever vibration, is authentically reggae.”

Just last week, Royal dropped his much anticipated sophomore album, Royal, which shares the authenticity and the beauty of the reggae genre in a way that’s both approachable and universal. It’s a journey full of real situations and real experiences that he feels everybody can share and enjoy together — regardless of their experience with his music or the genre as a whole.

When asked about the goal of his new album, Royal said, “This is definitely something that I’m incredibly excited to share with the world, with fans, but also people who probably never heard of Jesse Royal or heard of reggae. I try to give them something to fall in love with, because we feel like reggae is such a beautiful genre with beautiful people with a beautiful message, and we feel like everybody deserves to hear or experience this.” 

Despite his laid back demeanor, Royal is extremely thoughtful and conscientious about his music and how it is received. “This is our duty as deliverers of the message to ensure that whatever we do is palatable, one, but also understandable, ya dig?”

Source: Samo
Reggae singer and songwriter Jesse Royal promoting his new album Royal.

Equally as authentic as his love for the island of Jamaica and reggae music is his love for weed, which began in childhood with his friendship with Daniel Bambaata Marley, son of Ziggy Marley. He describes the Marleys as “very royal, honorable kind of people” who inspired him and helped shape him into the adult he is today. He and Daniel, whom he considers a lifelong friend, started smoking weed young, around age 11 or 12. 

“Well, if I’m being honest, we first started to burn herb when me and Daniel used to pick up some of the spliff tails that were left by Uncle Ziggy or whoever, and the reality is the spliff tails were probably still like five grams worth of weed, you know what I mean?” he said with a laugh. 

Outside of making music and burning good herb, Royal enjoys cooking, reading, football, and most importantly, connecting with his community in Jamaica as an activist. He aims to start a conversation about the accessibility of cannabis in his native country, ensuring that those who really need it can get it, even if they can’t afford it. 

“[In Jamaica] we kind of feel like herb has a big part to play in terms of the movement of us as a human race — in terms of our thinking, in terms of how we deal with each other, in terms of the way we deal with ourselves … it’s good to see the world moving in the right direction and I can’t wait until we actually see the benefits that we’ll reap from a society where we normalize medicine that is natural.” 

Check out these five weed products that Jesse Royal can’t live without. 

Lion Paw strain

“The Lion Paw strain, which we developed specifically for our community in Jamaica, [is a] high, high grade indica with certain tones that are understandable by our people, and to see the reception from them is excellent, you know what I mean? We and Jacana, who is the premiere dispensary in Jamaica right now, are really trying to change, in a social way, the idea of herb and herb consumption in Jamaica. This is a big mission, but we’re glad to be a part of it.”

Black Raw Rolling Papers

These unique rolling papers from Raw are produced in the Alcoy region of Spain, where dry winds keep humidity low and the quality of the paper super high. The papers are designed to be so thin that you can truly taste all of the terps in your trees. It’s no wonder Royal uses these every single day.

Raw Glass Rolling Tray

Made of the sturdiest translucent glass, the Raw glass rolling tray is designed to hold all the nugs you need while sitting perfectly in your lap for convenient rolling in any location. For Royal, the best part about this rolling tray is its “stashability as well as the usefulness.” 

GSC strain

A classic for good reason, GSC is a sativa-leaning hybrid bred by the illustrious Cookie Fam. Royal dubs this strain as one of his all-time favorites and said that he loves everything about it, from its flavor notes to the care that’s given to the herb throughout the cultivation process. 

Iaso Goods Four Piece Grinder

As someone who rolls up everyday, a quality grinder is essential to Royal. The Iaso Goods four-piece 1.75-inch grinder is made of the highest quality stainless steel, ensuring that no harmful materials — like aluminum shavings — end up in your flower. “Because of the quantity of herb we smoke, this is needed.”

Featured image by Samo. Graphic by David Lozada/Weedmaps

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Cannabis Canada Weekly: Legalization spurs more Canadian consumption, study says – Article – BNN – BNN


Cannabis stigma fading, consumption rising and infused dishes could be a hit, study finds

Nearly three years after cannabis was legalized in Canada, more Canadians consume pot than previously thought, while the overall stigma of the plant continues to fade, according to a new study released by Dalhousie University.
 
The study, based on a survey of Canadians conducted last month, found that 42 per cent of respondents consider themselves a cannabis consumer, with roughly 12 per cent stating that they have begun to use marijuana after it was legalized in October 2018. That’s significantly higher than the 20 per cent of Canadians believed to have used cannabis, according to a recent Statistics Canada report, and up from 36 per cent from a similar Dalhousie study conducted in 2019.

Embedded Image

“It’s clear that the acceptance and consumption of cannabis social stigma is dropping,” said Brian Sterling, a research associate in the Agri-Food Analytics Lab at Dalhousie University and president of SCS Consulting, who co-authored the report. Sterling co-wrote the study alongside Sylvain Charlebois, senior director of the Agri-Food Analytics Lab at Dalhousie University. “It’s becoming normalized. More people are buying it legally. Most people aren’t really terribly concerned about talking openly about it now anymore.”
 
Other findings in the broad-ranging study show that Canadians’ attitudes toward cannabis have shifted significantly since legalization and many people are now in favour of legal marijuana as well as products such as edibles and consumption of the drug in public settings like restaurants.
 
The study found that 78 per cent of Canadians are now strongly in favour of legalization, up from roughly half of the country in a previous survey released in 2019. Nearly 60 per cent of Canadians now procure their cannabis solely from legal sources, nearly double the 38 per cent of people who said they did two years ago. And about 32 per cent of survey respondents state that they consumed more cannabis over the past year than they used to. 14 per cent directly attributed their increased consumption to the COVID-19 pandemic, which has led more people to use a variety of recreational substances as potential coping mechanisms.

Embedded Image

“For me that says that Canadians have accepted the fact that cannabis is legal and now they want to have it convenient to get,” said Sterling in a phone interview. “All of this nonsense that we kind of anticipated when legalization took place hasn’t happened. So let’s move on with our lives and let’s normalize it. I think that’s the message that we’re getting.”
 
Cannabis-infused edible products were also given a spotlight in the study, with one-quarter of survey respondents claiming it is their preferred method of consumption and 14 per cent of Canadians expected to increase their usage of that item. Candies or gummies were the overwhelming preferred option of all edibles, with 35 per cent of consumers picking that product, while just four per cent of respondents picked beverages.
 
Meanwhile, infusing cannabis into one’s home cooking is emerging as a popular option for consumption, although it generally remains a mystery to most Canadians, the study found. More than 18 per cent of respondents said they feel comfortable cooking with cannabis, while just over one-quarter would be willing to order a cannabis-infused dish at a restaurant. Of those restaurant orders, about 21 per cent of respondents would prefer to take out their infused orders, while a similar amount would prefer a specialty cannabis food establishment.
 
While the laws restrict Canadian restaurants from offering dishes containing cannabis and public consumption is still being mulled by several provinces, Sterling thinks that allowing pot meals to flourish will help generate some extra revenue for some foodservice outlets, which have already been badly hit during the pandemic.
 
“With cannabis cooking at home, I think that that’s still got a long ways to go,” Sterling said. “But going out to a restaurant and ordering something that’s got cannabis in it is something that I really think could be accelerated. There feels like a pent-up demand for that offering.”
 
The Dalhousie study was conducted over ten days in May 2021, and surveyed 1,047 people across Canada, in both English and French.

THIS WEEK’S TOP STORIES

Connecticut set to legalize adult-use sales, federal reform bill expected in July

Connecticut will become the 18th U.S. state to legalize cannabis after the state’s Senate voted in favour of legislation to allow sales of recreational marijuana. The bill now heads to the desk of Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont to formally become law, which is widely expected. Cannabis industry trade newssite MJBiz reports sales in the state could hit as high as US$750 million after four years of operation. The news comes amid thawing sentiment from southern U.S. states on cannabis legalization, with Marijuana Moment reporting that Texas and Louisiana are expected to sign cannabis reform bills tied to either medical usage or decriminalization efforts. This groundswell of cannabis support comes as policymakers and industry executives await a wide-ranging cannabis reform bill from Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer that Curaleaf Executive Chairman Boris Jordan said may be introduced in July. That can’t come soon enough for some Canadian cannabis producers including Canopy Growth who are eyeing entry into the U.S. THC market, The Canadian Press reports.

B.C. pot shops to begin delivery services next month

Cannabis retailers in B.C. will finally be able to provide delivery services to customers next month, the provincial government said. CTV News reports B.C.’s Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General allowed retailers to deliver cannabis products to customers directly in an effort to move consumers away from the illicit market. Previously, only the provincially-run online retailer was allowed to delivery cannabis products to customers. Meanwhile, Alberta retailers are being consulted by the province to gauge their interest in providing online cannabis sales and in Ontario, retailers are still permitted to provide their own delivery services after the province entered Step 1 in its pandemic-recovery plan. 

Cronos stakes U.S. THC plans with option to buy 10.5% stake in PharmaCann

Cronos Group has finally planted a flag at its first U.S. multi-state operator, announcing it agreed to an option to buy a 10.5 per cent stake in privately-held PharmaCann valued at $110.4 million as soon as cannabis is legalized federally in the U.S. PhamaCann operates in six states with 23 dispensaries and six production facilities, according to a release. Cronos said two of its board members – Executive Chairman Michael Gorenstein and Jason Adler – both held an indirect stake in PharmaCann through their Gotham Green Partners venture, and recused themselves from the deal. A special committee of board members was formed to make a recommendation on the PharamaCann purchase, the company said. Piper Sandler Analyst Michael Lavery said in a report that as the U.S. continues to mull its own legalization framework, Canadian LPs like Cronos need to “look for ways to prepare besides just waiting for the gates to the U.S. to open”.

GM mulling an end to drug testing to recruit more workers

General Motors may drop cannabis testing for its workers following a recent attempt at hiring new staff that fell short of expectations, according to the Detroit Free Press. Two GM union leaders said testing the automaker’s workers for cannabis is deterring potential employees from working with the Detroit-based firm, and one company spokesperson said that it is dicussing the matter interally​. One of the drug-testing methods the automaker uses is through hair sampling, which can detect cannabis weeks after consumption. Michigan legalized recreational cannabis in 2018 with sales beginning a year later.

MJardin hires restructuring firm to advise on potential asset sale

MJardin Group has retained a restructuring firm to advise a special committee of board members to review a potential sale of the Canadian cannabis producer’s assets after a court monitor was appointed to manage the affairs of Bridging Finance, a major lender to the company. The development comes a month after an Ontario court appointed PriceWaterhouseCoopers to manage Bridging Finance following a probe from capital markets regulators that alleged the private lender mismanged its funds and senior executives failed to disclose conflicts of interest. The firm has $155.8 million in outstanding loans with MJardin. MJardin said it retained B.C.-based Restructur Advisors to provide the special committee with general restructuring advice. Canaccord Genuity has resigned as financial advisor to the special committee, the company added.

Hexo slides after disappointing Q3 results amid sales challenges

Hexo reported disappointing third-quarter results Monday that missed analyst expectations after missing some key product deliveries in a couple of Canadian provinces. The Ottawa-based cannabis producer said it generated $22.6 million in revenue in its fiscal third quarter, down 29 per cent from the prior three-month period and up just two per cent from a year earlier. The company also posted a $10.8 million adjusted EBITDA loss, halting momentum from the prior quarter when it posted a gain. Hexo Chief Executive Officer Sebastien St-Louis told BNN Bloomberg the sales miss came largely from challenges getting some of its products to market during the quarter, specifically the potency of some new cannabis strains it was cultivating for the Quebec market. “What happened nine months later, when we actually cultivated outside of our greenhouse, is we did not hit the same quality [for those strains] that had been done in our indoor facility in Bradford, so that was very disappointing,” he said.

Analyst Call of the Week – BMO Capital Markets on Canopy Growth

BMO Capital Markets Analyst Tamy Chen released a report to clients Thursday examining the pathway for Canopy Growth to become profitable. The Smiths Falls, Ont.-based pot giant expects to achieve positive EBITDA by the end of its fiscal 2022 and has earmarked 40 per cent gross margin as a longer-term goal. Chen analyzed Canopy’s financials, determining that the company’s business-to-business sales generates breakeven to a modest positive gross profit. With that in mind, Chen estimates that over the medium-term, and with a product mix that is skewed to both deeply-discounted and value offerings, Canopy generates a gross margin of mid-20 per cent to low-30 per cent. Chen believes that it will be difficult for Canopy to achieve a gross margin higher than 35 per cent outside of the Premium price segment unless cannabis regulations in Canada change, prices increase meaningfully, or if the company can enter the U.S. cannabis market where limited license states allow for cannabis operators to be own and operate production facilities and retail outlets. Chen maintains a “market perform” and $32 price target on Canopy’s stock.

For more info on Canopy Growth, click here.

CANNABIS SPOT PRICE: $5.53 per gram — This week’s price is down 0.8 per cent from the prior week, according to the Cannabis Benchmark’s Canada Cannabis Spot Index. This equates to US$2,073 per pound at current exchange rates.

WEEKLY BUZZ

1.067 billion

– The amount in grams of unpackaged dried flower either produced or stuck in inventory by Canada’s licensed cannabis producers, according to Health Canada data for March 2021​.

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Leading Medical Marijuana Doctor Believes Some Aspects of MMJ Should Evolve | Westword – Westword

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On June 8, the Colorado Legislature passed House Bill 1317, which would add several layers of protocol to medical marijuana recommendations, including a required THC dosage amount and more medical and mental- health reviews. The measure would also expand tracking on patient purchases and require extra doctor approval for patients under 21.

Governor Jared Polis hasn’t indicated whether he’ll sign the bill, but if he does, a number of changes in Colorado’s medical marijuana program are on the way, according to medical marijuana advocates and doctors, who warn that those changes could result in a decline of patients in the state. Still, one influential medical marijuana physician thinks that one aspect of the bill will start an important conversation — even if he opposed its passage.

Jordan Tishler has spent almost a decade as a medical marijuana practitioner, and now directs the Association of Cannabis Specialists while serving on the faculty at Harvard Medical School. While he believes HB 1317 will prove harmful for medical marijuana patients and worries that it could make finding a doctor recommendation more difficult, Tishler thinks it’s time that some aspects of the MMJ doctor-patient relationship grew up.

Westword: Do you see states implement and regulate medical marijuana in a similar manner across the country, as we do with recreational marijuana?

Dr. Jordan Tishler: They’re similar from a 30,000-foot view, but they get less and less similar as you get closer. Different states allow different types and amounts of products, and they have different testing standards. I think what’s embedded in your question, though, is do we need to get past all these different systems and into a national policy? That’s something we’re spending a lot of time and effort heading toward.

How do you see Colorado’s new bill and medical marijuana restrictions lining up with the national policy you’d like to see one day?

I think this bill has some major problems, and it’s not something I agree with in its entirety. The fact that the bill has moved on from [the legislature] is as much concerning for me as it is a positive. It wasn’t my hope that this bill would come to fruition so much as that it would jump-start a conversation around better elements.

The elements of it that I think are positive are the early sections, where it talks about physicians having to essentially write a prescription that specify what a patient needs to get, how much they need to get, how to use it and when to use it. [These] are things that are sorely lacking in every state besides Florida, oddly enough. This is absolutely essential, because the prescription in the conventional medical world has evolved over the last hundred years or so. It has become a tool that allows us to be very specific about what the patient will get, and it allows us to know the patient got the correct stuff. So if the treatment works or doesn’t work, we have some basis of understanding what’s going on. Furthermore, it prevents the dispensaries from a lot of unnecessary and inappropriate sales tactics — things like upselling in quantity, deals and specials and side-selling.

I have patients who go into dispensaries for $50 worth of medicine and come home with $400 worth of other stuff that I would’ve never recommended. Then they’ll call me back and tell me it’s not working. Right now there is a potential for miscommunication between dispensaries and physicians that harms patients and undermines their therapy. A prescription is how we get past that. I think that portion of the bill is a great aspect, and a part I wanted to highlight.

Dispensaries, both medical and recreational, need to stop giving medical advice. They need to stop telling people that such and such product is good for a medical problem. Now if someone walks into a dispensary and says, “I’m having a few people over and I’m cooking branzino. What do you have that works well with that?” — I have no issue with that. But if someone walks in and asks what’s good for a backache, I think dispensaries need to have a clear regulatory mandate that makes them respond with a list of health-care providers who can help with that. That’s what happens at a pharmacy, and it’s the only way to get patients what they need.

Some attorneys and patients have brought up a legal argument that adding dosage and consumption rules to a medical marijuana recommendation makes that a prescription, and doctors with prescription power must register with the Drug Enforcement Administration, which doesn’t allow prescribing Schedule I drugs.

I think it’s absolutely bunk. Part of this is a history lesson. Medical cannabis was started back in California in 1996, at a time when the country’s approach to cannabis was very different than it is now. At the time, the DEA was threatening physicians with the loss of their prescribing rights, so California’s attempt was to say that doctors won’t prescribe this, but in their opinion, the benefit outweighs the risks for patients. Arguably, that’s not a tenable or ethical point of view, but it was the best they could do at the time.

Now we move forward, and the reality is that the federal government doesn’t own prescribing. Prescribing existed long before any federal entity had jurisdiction over it, and there have been a number of cases that affirmed the physician’s right to be specific and have a discussion with their patient within the privacy of their offices. Being specific about products and their details is not illegal, and we need to recognize that not doing those things violates informed consent, which is fundamental and legally mandated through Supreme Court precedent. Point being, if the physician is not specific with the patient and doesn’t discuss what they need, how to use it, what the side effects and benefits are and all those things, then the physician is remiss in their duty to complete the “informed” part of informed consent. I’d also point out the DEA hasn’t punished a physician for that in over ten years.

You mentioned the bill has some major problems. Where do you think those problems are?

There are a number of other issues in the bill. If I were king, I’d say each bill should only have one issue, and there are a lot in here. The issues I have here are those surrounding concentrates and those surrounding young adults, aged eighteen to twenty. I think that requiring two pediatricians or physicians for patients eighteen and lower sounds deceptive, too, and leads to significant barriers of care. For example, in Massachusetts, there was exactly one pediatrician in the entire state who was willing to evaluate and certify child patients for medical marijuana — and he retired. At the moment, there is no one in a state of five million people to do it, and that’s a problem.

Putting guardrails to make sure physicians are doing the right thing is an issue for the board of registration in each state. If someone felt pediatric patients were given cannabis without the appropriate evaluation, the state would start a review process to see if appropriate medical standards were upheld. Mandating ahead of time that there is the confluence of two physicians or pediatricians, though — I think that makes things tougher than necessary.

From a medical point of view, it’s very clear that eighteen- to twenty-year-olds are closer to the pediatric side of things than the adult side of things on a neuro-development scale, but we draw a line at eighteen and deem that to be an adult in most cases, including health care and a need for privacy and autonomy. It doesn’t make sense to strip that autonomy from that age group, statutorily. If people are being mistreated by unscrupulous physicians  — and I acknowledge they exist — the appropriate thing is to not pass a new law, but use the laws that exist to examine the physician’s actions and govern behavior for an examination of the circumstances.

Do you see other states with similar medical marijuana programs to Colorado’s following suit and enacting restrictions?

That’s an interesting question, but I don’t know the answer. It could. If those two sections become law, this is not going to accomplish anything positive. It will make life harder for a lot of people. However, I think it doesn’t create enough positive change for other states to emulate, unless those states do it based on the theoretical, and not what’s actually happening. You’d think other states would be smarter than this.

Keep Westword Free… Since we started Westword, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Denver, and we would like to keep it that way. Offering our readers free access to incisive coverage of local news, food and culture. Producing stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands, with gutsy reporting, stylish writing, and staffers who’ve won everything from the Society of Professional Journalists’ Sigma Delta Chi feature-writing award to the Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism. But with local journalism’s existence under siege and advertising revenue setbacks having a larger impact, it is important now more than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our “I Support” membership program, allowing us to keep covering Denver with no paywalls.

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Cannabis Canada Weekly: Legalization spurs more Canadian consumption, study says – Article – BNN


Cannabis stigma fading, consumption rising and infused dishes could be a hit, study finds

Nearly three years after cannabis was legalized in Canada, more Canadians consume pot than previously thought, while the overall stigma of the plant continues to fade, according to a new study released by Dalhousie University.
 
The study, based on a survey of Canadians conducted last month, found that 42 per cent of respondents consider themselves a cannabis consumer, with roughly 12 per cent stating that they have begun to use marijuana after it was legalized in October 2018. That’s significantly higher than the 20 per cent of Canadians believed to have used cannabis, according to a recent Statistics Canada report, and up from 36 per cent from a similar Dalhousie study conducted in 2019.

Embedded Image

“It’s clear that the acceptance and consumption of cannabis social stigma is dropping,” said Brian Sterling, a research associate in the Agri-Food Analytics Lab at Dalhousie University and president of SCS Consulting, who co-authored the report. Sterling co-wrote the study alongside Sylvain Charlebois, senior director of the Agri-Food Analytics Lab at Dalhousie University. “It’s becoming normalized. More people are buying it legally. Most people aren’t really terribly concerned about talking openly about it now anymore.”
 
Other findings in the broad-ranging study show that Canadians’ attitudes toward cannabis have shifted significantly since legalization and many people are now in favour of legal marijuana as well as products such as edibles and consumption of the drug in public settings like restaurants.
 
The study found that 78 per cent of Canadians are now strongly in favour of legalization, up from roughly half of the country in a previous survey released in 2019. Nearly 60 per cent of Canadians now procure their cannabis solely from legal sources, nearly double the 38 per cent of people who said they did two years ago. And about 32 per cent of survey respondents state that they consumed more cannabis over the past year than they used to. 14 per cent directly attributed their increased consumption to the COVID-19 pandemic, which has led more people to use a variety of recreational substances as potential coping mechanisms.

Embedded Image

“For me that says that Canadians have accepted the fact that cannabis is legal and now they want to have it convenient to get,” said Sterling in a phone interview. “All of this nonsense that we kind of anticipated when legalization took place hasn’t happened. So let’s move on with our lives and let’s normalize it. I think that’s the message that we’re getting.”
 
Cannabis-infused edible products were also given a spotlight in the study, with one-quarter of survey respondents claiming it is their preferred method of consumption and 14 per cent of Canadians expected to increase their usage of that item. Candies or gummies were the overwhelming preferred option of all edibles, with 35 per cent of consumers picking that product, while just four per cent of respondents picked beverages.
 
Meanwhile, infusing cannabis into one’s home cooking is emerging as a popular option for consumption, although it generally remains a mystery to most Canadians, the study found. More than 18 per cent of respondents said they feel comfortable cooking with cannabis, while just over one-quarter would be willing to order a cannabis-infused dish at a restaurant. Of those restaurant orders, about 21 per cent of respondents would prefer to take out their infused orders, while a similar amount would prefer a specialty cannabis food establishment.
 
While the laws restrict Canadian restaurants from offering dishes containing cannabis and public consumption is still being mulled by several provinces, Sterling thinks that allowing pot meals to flourish will help generate some extra revenue for some foodservice outlets, which have already been badly hit during the pandemic.
 
“With cannabis cooking at home, I think that that’s still got a long ways to go,” Sterling said. “But going out to a restaurant and ordering something that’s got cannabis in it is something that I really think could be accelerated. There feels like a pent-up demand for that offering.”
 
The Dalhousie study was conducted over ten days in May 2021, and surveyed 1,047 people across Canada, in both English and French.

THIS WEEK’S TOP STORIES

Connecticut set to legalize adult-use sales, federal reform bill expected in July

Connecticut will become the 18th U.S. state to legalize cannabis after the state’s Senate voted in favour of legislation to allow sales of recreational marijuana. The bill now heads to the desk of Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont to formally become law, which is widely expected. Cannabis industry trade newssite MJBiz reports sales in the state could hit as high as US$750 million after four years of operation. The news comes amid thawing sentiment from southern U.S. states on cannabis legalization, with Marijuana Moment reporting that Texas and Louisiana are expected to sign cannabis reform bills tied to either medical usage or decriminalization efforts. This groundswell of cannabis support comes as policymakers and industry executives await a wide-ranging cannabis reform bill from Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer that Curaleaf Executive Chairman Boris Jordan said may be introduced in July. That can’t come soon enough for some Canadian cannabis producers including Canopy Growth who are eyeing entry into the U.S. THC market, The Canadian Press reports.

B.C. pot shops to begin delivery services next month

Cannabis retailers in B.C. will finally be able to provide delivery services to customers next month, the provincial government said. CTV News reports B.C.’s Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General allowed retailers to deliver cannabis products to customers directly in an effort to move consumers away from the illicit market. Previously, only the provincially-run online retailer was allowed to delivery cannabis products to customers. Meanwhile, Alberta retailers are being consulted by the province to gauge their interest in providing online cannabis sales and in Ontario, retailers are still permitted to provide their own delivery services after the province entered Step 1 in its pandemic-recovery plan. 

Cronos stakes U.S. THC plans with option to buy 10.5% stake in PharmaCann

Cronos Group has finally planted a flag at its first U.S. multi-state operator, announcing it agreed to an option to buy a 10.5 per cent stake in privately-held PharmaCann valued at $110.4 million as soon as cannabis is legalized federally in the U.S. PhamaCann operates in six states with 23 dispensaries and six production facilities, according to a release. Cronos said two of its board members – Executive Chairman Michael Gorenstein and Jason Adler – both held an indirect stake in PharmaCann through their Gotham Green Partners venture, and recused themselves from the deal. A special committee of board members was formed to make a recommendation on the PharamaCann purchase, the company said. Piper Sandler Analyst Michael Lavery said in a report that as the U.S. continues to mull its own legalization framework, Canadian LPs like Cronos need to “look for ways to prepare besides just waiting for the gates to the U.S. to open”.

GM mulling an end to drug testing to recruit more workers

General Motors may drop cannabis testing for its workers following a recent attempt at hiring new staff that fell short of expectations, according to the Detroit Free Press. Two GM union leaders said testing the automaker’s workers for cannabis is deterring potential employees from working with the Detroit-based firm, and one company spokesperson said that it is dicussing the matter interally​. One of the drug-testing methods the automaker uses is through hair sampling, which can detect cannabis weeks after consumption. Michigan legalized recreational cannabis in 2018 with sales beginning a year later.

MJardin hires restructuring firm to advise on potential asset sale

MJardin Group has retained a restructuring firm to advise a special committee of board members to review a potential sale of the Canadian cannabis producer’s assets after a court monitor was appointed to manage the affairs of Bridging Finance, a major lender to the company. The development comes a month after an Ontario court appointed PriceWaterhouseCoopers to manage Bridging Finance following a probe from capital markets regulators that alleged the private lender mismanged its funds and senior executives failed to disclose conflicts of interest. The firm has $155.8 million in outstanding loans with MJardin. MJardin said it retained B.C.-based Restructur Advisors to provide the special committee with general restructuring advice. Canaccord Genuity has resigned as financial advisor to the special committee, the company added.

Hexo slides after disappointing Q3 results amid sales challenges

Hexo reported disappointing third-quarter results Monday that missed analyst expectations after missing some key product deliveries in a couple of Canadian provinces. The Ottawa-based cannabis producer said it generated $22.6 million in revenue in its fiscal third quarter, down 29 per cent from the prior three-month period and up just two per cent from a year earlier. The company also posted a $10.8 million adjusted EBITDA loss, halting momentum from the prior quarter when it posted a gain. Hexo Chief Executive Officer Sebastien St-Louis told BNN Bloomberg the sales miss came largely from challenges getting some of its products to market during the quarter, specifically the potency of some new cannabis strains it was cultivating for the Quebec market. “What happened nine months later, when we actually cultivated outside of our greenhouse, is we did not hit the same quality [for those strains] that had been done in our indoor facility in Bradford, so that was very disappointing,” he said.

Analyst Call of the Week – BMO Capital Markets on Canopy Growth

BMO Capital Markets Analyst Tamy Chen released a report to clients Thursday examining the pathway for Canopy Growth to become profitable. The Smiths Falls, Ont.-based pot giant expects to achieve positive EBITDA by the end of its fiscal 2022 and has earmarked 40 per cent gross margin as a longer-term goal. Chen analyzed Canopy’s financials, determining that the company’s business-to-business sales generates breakeven to a modest positive gross profit. With that in mind, Chen estimates that over the medium-term, and with a product mix that is skewed to both deeply-discounted and value offerings, Canopy generates a gross margin of mid-20 per cent to low-30 per cent. Chen believes that it will be difficult for Canopy to achieve a gross margin higher than 35 per cent outside of the Premium price segment unless cannabis regulations in Canada change, prices increase meaningfully, or if the company can enter the U.S. cannabis market where limited license states allow for cannabis operators to be own and operate production facilities and retail outlets. Chen maintains a “market perform” and $32 price target on Canopy’s stock.

For more info on Canopy Growth, click here.

CANNABIS SPOT PRICE: $5.53 per gram — This week’s price is down 0.8 per cent from the prior week, according to the Cannabis Benchmark’s Canada Cannabis Spot Index. This equates to US$2,073 per pound at current exchange rates.

WEEKLY BUZZ

1.067 billion

– The amount in grams of unpackaged dried flower either produced or stuck in inventory by Canada’s licensed cannabis producers, according to Health Canada data for March 2021​.

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Southern Colorado Marijuana Farms Have New Ownership – Westword

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Some of Southern Colorado’s largest marijuana farms are changing their roots.

Massachusetts-based Curaleaf Holdings, one of the country’s largest marijuana companies, recently agreed to purchase Los Sueños, a 36-acre outdoor marijuana growing operation in Pueblo County, for over $60 million. Weeks later, Schwazze, a Denver-based marijuana conglomerate formerly known as Medicine Man Technologies, announced plans to acquire 34-acres of grow space from Southern Colorado Growers in Huerfano County for $11.3 million — and that’s not the only big pot operation taking over in Huerfano County, a community of less than 7,000 people located south of Pueblo.

Power REIT, a New York-based real estate investment trust with a hand in projects ranging greenhouse agriculture, solar power and railroads, committed $3.9 million for a 35-acre marijuana cultivation space in Huerfano County in late May. According to Power REIT, the greenhouse facility will be about 102,800 square feet when finished, with promises to deliver more economic and employment opportunities for one of Colorado’s poorest counties.

“Southern Colorado is an ideal location from an environmental standpoint to grow cannabis in a greenhouse,” Power REIT chairman and CEO David Lesser says in a statement. “We think this is an exceptional opportunity for us to invest in these projects and also for our tenant operators to build profitable businesses.”

Power REIT will lease the property to tenant and grower Walsenburg Cannabis LLC, led by Jared Schrader, Cedric Crockett and chief grow officer Belinda LeBlanc.

“It’s absolutely going to offer some benefits to the community. Jobs are hard to come by down here, and we’re going to have quite a bit of work to do,” LeBlanc says. “But the team and I enjoy training others, and we hope to bring people in even if they aren’t familiar with commercial growing of cannabis.”

Walsenburg Cannabis has already hired a few dozen employees, according to the company, and plans to hire up to 100 workers by next year. Outside of early complaints about marijuana’s distinct smell, the growing industry hasn’t caused much controversy, according to Huerfano County administrator Carl Young.

“They’ve been talking a lot about jobs, I don’t have an exact number, but if that does come to fruition that will be another good thing,” he says. “I expect that this will be a good thing for the community and there won’t be any further complaints.”

Tension briefly stirred between the previous landlord and marijuana growers at the site, when the nearby Spanish Peaks Regional Health Center, home to a veteran’s living center, complained over the grow’s skunky odor. But those complaints didn’t lead to any official action against the tenants or owner.

To avoid future complaints, Schrader says the facility will use an odor detector to ensure that levels comply with county regulations, in addition to a carbon air filtration system for extra measure. “We’ll be taking the proper measures to ensure that there’s no disturbance to our neighbors following county requirements regarding any noise, light or odor pollution,” he adds.

Schrader also plans to partner with affordable housing developer indieDwell to plan affordable living projects in Huerfano and Pueblo counties for the potential influx of new residents working in the marijuana industry. To help fund the project in Huerfano County, Schrader says his company will pay double the local 5-percent excise tax on marijuana businesses.

“Huerfano County is, unfortunately, a distressed county. What we’re excited about is the opportunity to give back to the community. Almost all of the employees that we’re bringing in are seeing an increase of wages from their previous jobs and will have healthcare, which is something sparse in the cannabis industry,” he says. “Next year, we’re projected to give back roughly $250,000 to the total county budget, which was just over a million dollars this year, so it would be a substantial increase for the community.

The project is expected to be up and running by this summer, according to Walsenburg Cannabis.

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As Texas Builds a ‘Hempire’ and Cannabis Laws Ease in Baby Steps, Lucky Leaf Expo Returns to Irving July 9-10 » Dallas Innovates – dallasinnovates.com

People may not be lighting up legal cannabis in Texas anytime soon. But with hemp farming legalized in Texas in 2019, CBD oil with .3% or less of THC legal here as well, and expanded use of medical cannabis passed in Austin just this month, it’s perfect timing for Lucky Leaf Expo—which will hold its second local hemp/CBD conference July 9-10 at the Irving Convention Center.

The expo will feature 120 exhibitors, 40 speakers, panels, Cooking with CBD and Hemp demos on the expo floor, and a pre-show Cannabis Business Crash Course presented by Cannacourse. The business course will be held Thursday, July 8 for a separate fee of $499.

“We have a diverse array of exhibitors in every channel of the CBD Hemp industry that specializes in the sale of seeds, CPAs, attorneys, accountants, processors, manufacturers, soft gel companies, to help get you started for your business,” said Chad Sloan, the expo’s sales director, in a statement.

[Image: Lucky Leaf]

Sloan told Dallas Innovates the expo is aimed about 50 percent at a business-to-business audience, and 50 percent for consumers “who are just curious about hemp, CBD and cannabis.”

Lucky Leaf held its first expo in North Texas back in 2019. The “hybrid” organization holds conferences around the country, with cannabis its main focus in states like Oklahoma, New Mexico, Virginia, Michigan, and New York, where medical or recreational usage is more widely available.

“In Texas, we do hemp and CBD shows only,” Sloan said—which means instead of  Cooking with Cannabis demos, Chef Michael Weinstein will be demonstrating CBD and hemp oil recipes. 

Still, up to 40% of the conference will focus on cannabis, efforts to legalize it, and business opportunities both now and in the future. “We’re just a hybrid company that’s smart enough to see potential in both industries,” Sloan told us.

Click the image to go to the Texas Department of Agriculture site.

Building a Texas ‘Hempire’

In 2019, industrial farming of hemp—a cousin of the cannabis plant without enough THC to cause intoxicating effects—was legalized by Texas House Bill 1325. Now there’s a whole Texas Department of Agriculture microsite devoted to the program.

“Here in Texas, we’ve been in the hemp business for almost a year and we’re busy building the Texas ‘hempire,’” said Texas Department of Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller in a statement last January. At that time Miller said Texas had “issued over 1,150 producer licenses, permitted over 5,000 acres of hemp in the ground, and over 15 million square feet of hemp in greenhouses.” 

Expanding medical cannabis in Texas

Earlier this month, a bipartisan measure in the Texas Legislature expanded Texas’ Compassionate Use Program. House Bill 1535—which Gov. Greg Abbott signed Tuesday—allows doctors to prescribe low-THC medical cannabis to all cancer and PTSD patients, and raises the THC amount from .5 percent to one percent. Gov. Greg Abbott signed But as the San Antonio Report notes, many cannabis supporters believe medical cannabis laws in Texas are still far too restricted.

Some 60 cannabis law reform bills were introduced in the state’s 87th Legislature this year, but only two reached Gov. Greg Abbott’s desk, the San Antonio Report wrote, quoting Dr. Bryon Adinoff, EVP of Doctors for Cannabis Regulation, as saying, “One percent THC is just CBD, and CBD is now legal throughout the country. Texas just is taking these tiny baby steps when the rest of the country is making tremendous strides and now has access to medical marijuana with reasonable amounts of THC.”

Is it safe to say that Lucky Leaf Expo is a proponent of medical and recreational cannabis legalization?

“Big time, yes. Big time,” said Sloan.

Dallas cannabis investment firm sees potential

The conference may resonate locally with at least one notable Dallas investor: Matt Hawkins, managing partner of the cannabis investment firm Entourage Effect Capital. Entourage has invested over $200 million in more than 65 cannabis-related companies in the last seven years, mostly on the west coast and in Colorado. Last month the firm announced its third Flagship Fund with a $150 million target, focusing on later-stage companies. You can read our profile of Hawkins here

For info on Lucky Leaf Expo’s ticket prices, hours, and more, visit their website here.

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    Nonprofit BUiLT is hosting the event to highlight the success and possibilities of Black tech talent in the region. “There is no talent pipeline problem,” says Peter Beasley, co-founder of the Blacks United in Leading Technology International. “Black tech talent is widely available, especially in North Texas.”

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  • “There hasn’t been a superhero like El Peso Hero,” Hector Rodriguez III says. “A hero that transcends cultures and borders for Texas and Mexico.”  The creator of the celebrated comic book series, who is a fifth-grade bilingual teacher for McKinney ISD, wears a lot of hats. He’s also the co-founder of Texas Latino Comic Con, a publisher and CEO, and development director of a lucha libre multimedia company. Coming soon: the movie.

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    … Governor Greg Abbott tweeted last week about signing a law for Texas to create a master plan for expanding the blockchain industry. Here’s more of “who said what” in Texas.

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